Male infertility could raise the risk of testicular cancer

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden found infertile men are likely to suffer from a deficiency of the hormone testosterone. This may increase the risk of testicular cancer.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In a large Australian study, researchers found that baby boys born with undescended testes had a higher risk of health problems like infertility and cancer, especially if corrective surgery was delayed.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Testicles Babies and Infants Testicular Cancer Children and Childhood Surgery and Surgeons Men and Boys Source Type: news
To analyze the sperm proteome of patients with testicular cancer non-seminoma (TCNS) before cancer treatment and identify proteins responsible for the altered reproductive function.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Poster session Source Type: research
Boys born with undescended testes had 2.4 times the risk of adult testicular cancer compared to other boys, the University of Sydney researchers reported.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
FRIDAY, Aug. 31, 2018 -- Young boys with undescended testes are at increased risk for testicular cancer and infertility in adulthood, new research suggests. Undescended testes are the most common birth defect in infant boys, affecting one in 100....
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
(University of Sydney) Medical researchers are urging greater compliance with guidelines recommending surgery for undescended testes (UDT) before 18 months of age following new evidence that UDT more than doubles the risk of testicular cancer and increases infertility in adult males.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS Results of this study suggest that ozone therapy, either as a single agent or in combination with hCG, is a promising approach for protection of testicular functions. PMID: 30130360 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
. Stadler There is a correlation between cryptorchidism and an increased risk of testicular cancer and infertility. During orchidopexy, testicular biopsies are performed to confirm the presence of type A dark (Ad) spermatogonia, which are a marker for low infertility risk (LIR). The Ad spermatogonia are absent in high infertility risk (HIR) patients, who are treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) to significantly lower the risk of infertility. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the molecular events involved in cryptorchidism. Previously, we compared the transcriptomes of LIR versus HIR...
Source: Genes - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Purpose of review Although platinum-based chemotherapy (CHT) remains the cornerstone of clinical stage I testicular germ cell tumor (GCT) treatment, its long-term toxicity and complications in cancer survivors are unclear. Recent findings Cardiovascular disease and secondary malignancies represent the most life-threatening long-term complications and typically occur 10 years after treatment. Other potential intermediate deleterious effects include pulmonary toxicity, ototoxicity, neurotoxicity, hypogonadism and infertility. The incidence and time to onset vary according to patients’ genetic susceptibility, CHT r...
Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: TESTICULAR CANCER: Edited by Aditya Bagrodia and Peter Albers Source Type: research
ConclusionIn cases of TML incidental finding by US with the presence of risk factors (personal history of testicular cancer, testicular atrophy, infertility, cryptorchidism) a consultation with a specialist should be considered. In the absence of risk factors, the occurrence of testicular cancer in patients with TML is similar to the risk of the general population.
Source: Basic and Clinical Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: There is an increasing demand for fertility preservation, especially from patients with benign disease. Only a small proportion of men utilised their banked sperm, however, those that did had a good chance of becoming fathers. Data from this study will be used to review our referral pathways and inform our future practice. PMID: 29944041 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
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