Taking hormone replacement therapy for at least 10 years 'can reduce dementia risk'

TAKING hormone replacement therapy for at least 10 years reduces the risk of dementia, according to new research.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In conclusion, HSC ageing is characterised by reduced self-renewal, myeloid and platelet HSC skewing, and expanded clonal haematopoiesis that is considered a preleukaemic state. The underlying molecular mechanisms seem to be related to increased oxidative stress due to ROS accumulation and DNA damage, which are influenced by both cell- and cell non-autonomous mechanisms such as prolonged exposure to infections, inflammageing, immunosenescence, and age-related changes in the HSC niche. Thus, HSC ageing seems to be multifactorial and we are only beginning to connect all the dots. The Price of Progress or the Waste...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In the U.S., two-thirds of people with Alzheimer’s disease are women, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. For decades, experts have explained the gender divide by the fact that women also tend to live longer than men, and the biggest risk factor for Alzheimer’s is age. “Everyone brushed it off to the fact that women were living longer,” says Rachel Whitmer, professor of epidemiology at University of California Davis. “Now science is saying, wait, that’s not the end of the story.” Pregnancy, according to two of the latest studies on the issue, may have something to do wi...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime Source Type: news
Does genetic testing for ERα gene polymorphisms provide new possibilities of treatment for cognitive function disorders in postmenopausal women? Arch Med Sci. 2017 Aug;13(5):1224-1232 Authors: Gujski M, Pinkas J, Wierzbińska-Stępniak A, Owoc A, Bojar I Abstract It is commonly considered that cognitive abilities decrease with age, especially with respect to processing and psychomotor speed. It is an interesting issue whether, apart from the ageing process, the undergoing of menopause itself deteriorates cognitive functions, compared to women at reproductive age. Hopes for improvement of cognitiv...
Source: Archives of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Tags: Arch Med Sci Source Type: research
Abstract Several lines of investigation have shown a protective role for estrogen in Alzheimer's disease through a number of biological actions. This review examines studies of the role of estrogen-related factors in age at onset and risk for Alzheimer's disease in women with Down syndrome, a population at high risk for early onset of dementia. The studies are consistent in showing that early age at menopause and that low levels of endogenous bioavailable estradiol in postmenopausal women with Down syndrome are associated with earlier age at onset and overall risk for dementia. Polymorphisms in genes associated wi...
Source: Free Radical Biology and Medicine - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Free Radic Biol Med Source Type: research
Throughout decades of study, hormone therapy (HT), often but not always the same as hormone replacement therapy (HRT), has been glorified and demonized in turn. The information that doctors receive has come from ongoing studies that seemed to offer over time radically conflicting results. A new study may add more confusion since this study has found that not only does HT given near menopause create changes in a woman’s brain, but motherhood itself creates changes. Read full article on how changing hormones can alter the risk of Alzheimer's: Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stor...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Postmenopausal estrogen-based hormone therapy lasting longer than ten years was associated with a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease in a large study. The study explored the association between postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy, Alzheimer's disease, dementia and cognition in two nation-wide case-control studies and two longitudinal cohort studies. The largest study comprised approximately 230,000 Finnish women and the follow-up time in different studies was up to 20 years.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news
In the late 1980s, several observational studies and meta-analyses suggested that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was beneficial for prevention of osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, dementia and decreased all-cause mortality. In 1992, the American College of Physicians recommended HRT for prevention of coronary disease. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, several randomized trials in older women suggested coronary harm and that the risks, including breast cancer, outweighed any benefit. HRT stopped being prescribed at that time, even for women who had severe symptoms of menopause.
Source: Atherosclerosis - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Review article Source Type: research
Researchers from Toronto University But said taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) pills may halt the cognitive decline in women after having their ovaries taken out.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Researchers from Toronto University But said taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) pills may halt the cognitive decline in women after having their ovaries taken out.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
HRT may protect women against dementia, a new study claims. Women who take oestrogen supplements before the start of menopause had better preserved brain structure.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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