Intensity modulated pelvic radiation therapy reduces patient reported toxicities

(NRG Oncology) NRG Oncology investigators report better patient-reported quality of life measures for women who received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for their pelvic radiation therapy (RT) than those who received standard RT.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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Condition:   Breast Cancer Intervention:   Radiation: External Beam radiotherapy using IMRT technique Sponsor:   Ruijin Hospital Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
This article describes a project on the transition from cobalt to a Halcyon radiation therapy system at INCAN through a partnership with the US Agency for International Development's Office of American Schools and Hospitals Abroad (USAID/ASHA), Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), industry partner Varian Medical Systems, and the US National Nuclear Security Administration to provide access to state-of-the-art radiation therapy technology while increasing the overall treatment capacity for the underserved population of Guatemala. PMID: 32698977 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Health Physics - Category: Physics Authors: Tags: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys Source Type: research
Radiation therapy (RT) is the cornerstone of treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Using contemporary intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), dose escalation with tumor ablative intent, while sparing surrounding normal organs, is feasible. Thus, significantly high local control and survival rate, as well as reduced chronic toxicities, can be achieved.[1 –3] How to further enhance the quality of care and long-term outcome is an issue worth studying.
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Little is known about the toxicity of additional pelvic lymph node irradiation in men receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to compare patient-reported outcomes following IMRT to the prostate only (PO-IMRT) versus the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes (PPLN-IMRT).
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Clinical trials support adjuvant regional nodal irradiation (RNI) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy for patients with lymph node-positive breast cancer. Advanced treatment planning techniques (e.g., intensity-modulated radiation therapy [IMRT]) may reduce dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in this situation. Yet, uncertainty persists about when IMRT is clinically indicated (versus 3D conformal radiation, 3DCRT) for RNI. We hypothesized that an adaptive treatment planning algorithm (adaptive-TPA) for IMRT adoption would allow OAR constraints for RNI to be met when 3DCRT could not without significantly changing ...
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
The not-for-profit organization La LIGA Nacional Contra el C áncer, with its hospital Instituto de Cancerología (INCAN), is responsible for cancer treatment of much of the indigent population in Guatemala, a country with a population of 16 million. Annually, approximately 70% of patients at INCAN are seen in late stages of cancer, which places a great strai n on the hospital’s limited resources. Private clinics account for 75% of radiation therapy centers in Guatemala and have considerable resources.
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Around the Globe Source Type: research
Aman Sharma, Amit BahlJournal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2020 16(3):425-433 Head-and-neck cancer (HNC) is in close proximity to several critical structures. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential of generating highly conformal and concave dose distributions around complex target and is ideally suited for HNC treatment. Conventionally, the focus of IMRT for HNC patients has been on prevention of radiation-induced parotid dysfunction. In the present article, we review the potential of IMRT to reduce the risk of posttreatment aspiration and dysphagia and spare submandibular gland. We also dis...
Source: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that CIPADDICK-TCP calculations for PTV and COSI-NTCP calculations for OARs were compatible with DVH in T1 GL plans. Therefore, we suggest such parameters as valuable tools for choosing the feasible one among multiple plans and even with different treatment machines.
Source: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common head and neck cancer in southern China. Radiotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach for NPC, rather than surgery. With the wide application of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), better treatment outcomes of NPC patients were achieved in modern era. But distant metastasis and local-regional relapse are still the causes of treatment failure, especially the former [1 –4]. Screening NPC patients with a high risk of distant metastases and local-regional relapse has implications for making informed decisions about NPC treatment.
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Radiation therapy for head neck cancers (HNCs) at the skull base can result in high doses of radiation delivered to the brain, potentially leading to radiation-associated image changes (RAIC) (1). Often the diagnosis of RAIC is based solely on radiographic findings on post-treatment MRIs obtained for routine cancer surveillance purposes. For HNCs, information on RAIC stems largely from studies in patients with nasopharyngeal cancers (NPC) treated with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), with reported incidences of temporal lobe RAIC ranging between 2% and 14% (2 –12).
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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