Histopathological evaluation of the healing effects of human amniotic membrane transplantation in third-degree burn wound injuries

Abstract Skin burn injuries result in loss of its protective function as a barrier and leading to a high risk of infection. Therefore, effective treatments and healing of burn injuries are very important to prevent complications. Amniotic membrane (AM) as a biological dressing inhibits the loss of vital fluids, water, and protein. The aim of this study was to compare the healing effects of AM and silver sulfadiazine (SSD) ointment in third-degree burn injuries in experimental rat model. Fifty-four male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided randomly into three equal groups. After induction of third-degree burn, transplantation of human AM (HAM) and SSD ointment used on wound area for treatment groups. The third group was considered as control. At days 7, 14, and 21, histopathological evaluation of burn wound area was performed using light microscopy. After 21 days, burn injury in HAM group showing lack of enough wound contraction and decrease in wound area in comparison to SSD group. Also, the healing effects were demonstrated using decline of inflammatory cell infiltration and enhanced epithelium after 21 days. The total wound score was significantly higher in the HAM group than the control and SSD ointment groups, during and at the end of the experiment (P 
Source: Comparative Clinical Pathology - Category: Pathology Source Type: research

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n Mou Salinity is a rising concern in many lettuce-growing regions. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is sensitive to salinity, which reduces plant biomass, and causes leaf burn and early senescence. We sought to identify physiological traits important in salt tolerance that allows lettuce adaptation to high salinity while maintaining its productivity. Based on previous salinity tolerance studies, one sensitive and one tolerant genotype each was selected from crisphead, butterhead, and romaine, as well as leaf types of cultivated lettuce and its wild relative, L. serriola L. Physiological parameters were measured four weeks ...
Source: Sensors - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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Source: South African Medical Journal - Category: African Health Tags: S Afr Med J Source Type: research
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Robert Chelsea suffered burns in 2013. In 2015, the United Network of Organ Sharing began a new allocation system aimed at a more racially equitable selection process of who receives a transplant.WebMD Health News
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Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Thbd expression on HSPC has minor effects on homeostatic hematopoiesis in mice, and is not conserved in humans. PMID: 31628891 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Thrombosis and Haemostasis - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: J Thromb Haemost Source Type: research
Pig skin isn ’t just for football these days.  Massachusetts General Hospital surgeons have successfully used genetically engineered pig skin for the temporary closure of a burn wound, the first time pig tissue derived from an animal with gene edits has been transplanted directly onto a human wound.  The F DA-cleared phase one clinical trial was led by surgeon Dr. Jeremy Goverman of MGH's Sumner Redstone Burn Center.  “It is not the trial itself that is so mind-boggling and intriguing to…
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