Africa: USAID Announces New Resources to Prevent Child, Early, and Forced Marriage
[USAID]Today, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Rajiv Shah announced over $4.8 million this year to fund programs in Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Tanzania, and Yemen to end child, early, and forced marriage. Congressional leaders have also recognized the importance of these efforts, and USAID will work alongside lawmakers to increase the agency's support next year to prevent child, early, and forced marriage. These efforts will also leverage $32 million as part o (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 23, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Yemen: Supporting IDPs in Sana'a and Amran
Yemen: Supporting IDPs in Sana'a and Amran  Recent fighting in Amran has driven many residents from the area. In response to their growing slate of medical needs, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has, in coordination with the Executive Unit for Managing IDPs’ Camps, supported 52 families located in Al-Najah school in Sana’a. The primary support was through the distribution of hygiene kits, non-food items, and mattresses; repairing nine bathrooms; providing water; and installing lights to help improve living conditions. (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - July 17, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Elias Primoff Source Type: news

New UN survey shows 10 million Yemenis still struggle for food
A new United Nations survey has found that over 10 million Yemenis – more than 40 per cent of the population – do not know where their next meal will come from. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - July 15, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cipla inks pact to acquire 51% stake in Yemeni company
As part of its global expansion, Cipla had completed the buyout of South African pharma firm Cipla Medpro for Rs 2,707 crore last year. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - June 30, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What Are Precautions for Someone Traveling to the Middle East About the Risk of MERS?
Discussion Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a respiratory illness cause by a coronavirus called MERS-CoV. It was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. People with confirmed cases of MERS have developed severe respiratory illness that includes acute onset of cough, shortness of breath, and fever. Other symptoms include gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea. Pneumonia is common, and patients may progress to respiratory failure. Other end organ failure has occurred, particularly kidney failure and septic shock. The death rate is up to ~30% currently. People with compromised immune systems are more at risk. T...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 16, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

World Bank Finds Huge Hole in Social Safety Nets
Manes Feston, flanked by her children, holds her four-month-old son Fedson. He was one of triplets but his siblings died because of a lack of welfare support. The family lives in a remote rural community in southern Malawi. Credit: Travis Lupick/IPSBy Farangis AbdurazokzodaWASHINGTON, May 13 2014 (IPS) Social safety net programmes have expanded, yet 870 million of the world’s poorest people remain uncovered, says a new World Bank report released Tuesday. Although over one billion people in 146 countries now participate in at least one of roughly 475 social safety net programmes, most of the extreme poor – those...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 14, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Farangis Abdurazokzoda Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Population Poverty & MDGs TerraViva United Nations World social protection World Bank Source Type: news

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) ā€“ update
On 15 April 2014, the IHR National Focal Point of Yemen notified WHO of a laboratory confirmed case of MERS-CoV in a 44 year-old male residing in Shibam. The patient was diagnosed as having hepatitis B and is reported to have developed symptoms on 17 March 2014, including fever, productive cough, chills, headache, muscle aches, and shortness of breath. He was admitted to hospital on 22 March 2014 in Hadramoot Governorate, and subsequently transferred on 29 March 2014 to an intensive-care unit of a private hospital in Sanaa. He was intubated, developed renal failure, and died on 31 March 2014. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - May 7, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: coronavirus [subject], Disease outbreak news [doctype], Eastern Mediterranean Region [region], Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), novel coronavirus, respiratory disease [subject], yem, Yemen [country], , Coronavirus infections, Coron Source Type: news

Global riot epidemic due to demise of cheap fossil fuels | Nafeez Ahmed
From South America to South Asia, a new age of unrest is in full swing as industrial civilisation transitions to post-carbon realityIf anyone had hoped that the Arab Spring and Occupy protests a few years back were one-off episodes that would soon give way to more stability, they have another thing coming. The hope was that ongoing economic recovery would return to pre-crash levels of growth, alleviating the grievances fueling the fires of civil unrest, stoked by years of recession. But this hasn't happened. And it won't.Instead the post-2008 crash era, including 2013 and early 2014, has seen a persistence and proliferatio...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 1, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Nafeez Ahmed Tags: theguardian.com Blogposts Inflation World news Ukraine Food Protest Geology Peak oil Climate change Venezuela Environment Agriculture Science Source Type: news

Global riot epidemic due to demise of cheap fossil fuels | Nafeez Ahmed
From South America to South Asia, a new age of unrest is in full swing as industrial civilisation transitions to post-carbon realityIf anyone had hoped that the Arab Spring and Occupy protests a few years back were one-off episodes that would soon give way to more stability, they have another thing coming. The hope was that ongoing economic recovery would return to pre-crash levels of growth, alleviating the grievances fueling the fires of civil unrest, stoked by years of recession. But this hasn't happened. And it won't.Instead the post-2008 crash era, including 2013 and early 2014, has seen a persistence and proliferatio...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 28, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Nafeez Ahmed Tags: Environment Science Geology Food Inflation Protest World news Agriculture Climate change Peak oil Venezuela Ukraine theguardian.com Blogposts Source Type: news

A Nation Chewing Itself to Death
Yemen's preoccupation with the leafy stimulant qat is having dire consequences. Credit: Cam McGrath/IPS.By Cam McGrathSANAA, Jan 31 2014 (IPS) The Yemeni capital of Sanaa is reputed to be over 2,500 years old, making it one of the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world. But it is living on borrowed time. Economists warn that if poverty trends continue, by 2030 more than half of the Sanaa’s projected four million inhabitants will be unable to afford their basic food needs. But before that happens, the city will run out of water. “Sanaa is using water much faster than nature can replace it,” says ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 31, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Cam McGrath Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Middle East & North Africa Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Qat Yemen Source Type: news

Plague of locusts destroys crops in Yemen ā€“ video
Swarms of locusts have invaded agricultural land across Yemen, causing misery and huge crop losses for farmers (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 23, 2013 Category: Science Tags: theguardian.com Food security World news Yemen Agriculture Source Type: news

Can frankincense really fight cancer?
Conclusion Very little can be said, based on the preliminary and unverified findings of this laboratory study. The study is yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal and until this happens, it is worth exercising a little healthy scepticism about the claims being made and the time of year they are being made in. This research is still at a very early stage and as the press release points out, frankincense is yet to be studied for the treatment of ovarian cancer in humans. The findings of this preliminary research do not affect the current methods for treating ovarian cancer.   Analysis by Bazian. Edited by NHS Ch...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer QA articles Source Type: news

According to the WHO, Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) affect over 1 billion people worldwide, and are devastating to patients in the developing world. What is being done to get treatments to these patients and to speed development of new treatments?
conversationsneglected tropical diseasestropical diseasesnew medicinesInnovationOpinion46864687468846894690469246914693Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) impact more than a billion people in some of the poorest, most remote parts of the world, blinding, disabling, disfiguring and sickening those infected. They have a negative impact on life expectancy, productivity and childhood education -- all of which create a cycle of poverty and stigma for affected communities. Today, because of renewed and new commitments, millions impacted by NTDs are being treated, several NTDs are being controlled effectively, and some even elimin...
Source: PHRMA - December 10, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Stephen Source Type: news

MPs urge Theresa May to reverse qat ban
Stumulent widely used by Somali and Yemeni communities was criminalised without proper evidence of its harm, committe saysMPs are urging Theresa May, the home secretary, to reverse the government's ban on the herbal stimulant qat, which is widely used in Britain's Somali and Yemeni communities.A Commons home affairs select committee report published on Friday said the decision to ban qat, also known as khat, was not based on any evidence of medical or social harm and that it would be better to license importers of the plant.The call to reverse the decision on qat came as the government's advisory council on the misuse of d...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Alan Travis Tags: theguardian.com Middle East and North Africa Somalia World news Yemen Drugs Politics Drugs policy Theresa May Science Source Type: news

Solar-powered travel: opening up new routes across sky, sea and land
A new generation of solar-powered vehicles is making extraordinary journeys around the world and pushing the boundaries of technical knowledgeThe wings of the experimental aircraft arch more than 63 metres, the same span as an Airbus A340, but they look frail, supported on the airstrip by wheeled struts. They are covered in a patina of 11,268 photovoltaic cells, which look dark blue in the grey predawn. The four 10-horsepower propellers they power now start to spin silently. Bertrand Piccard, a 55-year-old explorer and psychiatrist, dons his helmet and oxygen mask and completes his final checks. The Solar Impulse quietly t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 25, 2013 Category: Science Tags: World news Solar power Engineering Travel Road transport Oceans Technology Features Politics Air transport The Observer Environment Transport policy Science Source Type: news

[Video] Migrants in Yemen Tell of Horrific Experiences
(Source: MSF Multimedia)
Source: MSF Multimedia - August 22, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

VIDEO: Yemen facing water shortage crisis
Yemen is facing a severe water crisis with some estimates suggesting the capital, Sanaa, could run dry in 10 years. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - August 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Violence forces MSF to leave hospital
On July 31, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) was forced to withdraw from Al-Salam Hospital in Khamer, Amran governorate, northern Yemen, after violent attacks against its personnel and facilities. MSF withdrew after staff received death threats related to a tribal dispute. This was not an isolated incident. In the last five months there have been 18 violent incidents in Amran, including threats and physical assaults against MSF staff, ambushing and hijacking of ambulances and other vehicles, and shootings at or around the hospital. Yemen © Malak Shaher/MSF. A one-month-old infant in the nursery in Al-S...
Source: MSF News - August 6, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Yemen NEWS Frontpage Violence Source Type: news

Humans: the real threat to life on Earth
If population levels continue to rise at the current rate, our grandchildren will see the Earth plunged into an unprecedented environmental crisis, argues computational scientist Stephen Emmott in this extract from his book Ten BillionEarth is home to millions of species. Just one dominates it. Us. Our cleverness, our inventiveness and our activities have modified almost every part of our planet. In fact, we are having a profound impact on it. Indeed, our cleverness, our inventiveness and our activities are now the drivers of every global problem we face. And every one of these problems is accelerating as we continue to gr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 30, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Stephen Emmott Tags: Population Culture World news Books Extracts Features Climate change The Observer Environment Science Source Type: news

Young Yemen Multiplies Without Growth
Contraceptives on sale at a store in Sanaa, but there are not enough buyers. Credit: Rebecca Murray/IPS.Yemen’s population is increasing at a rapid rate, straining the country’s dwindling natural resources and setting up its youth for a grim future, with few jobs and scant means to get by. Visiting a family planning clinic in downtown Sanaa, Layla waits for a routine birth control checkup. She believes she was 14 when she got married and pregnant, but is not sure. From the rural town of Beni Matar, south of the capital, Layla, now 20, and her three children are like four-fifths of Yemen’s mostly rural pop...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 25, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Rebecca Murray Tags: Active Citizens Arabs Rise for Rights Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Gender Gender Identity Headlines Health Human Rights Middle East & North Africa Population Poverty & MDGs Projects Regional Categories Religion Source Type: news

Jordan: International Aid Urgently Needed for Syrian Refugees
Jordan 2013 © Enass Abu Khalaf-Tuffaha/MSF Zaatari Camp, close to the Syrian border, where over 100,000 Syria refugees reside.  NEW YORK, MAY 30, 2013—Hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees in Jordan are living under increasingly precarious conditions and Jordanian authorities are unable to provide them with adequate water and health care, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) warned today. Increased international aid is urgently needed so that Jordan can cope with the rising influx of people and remain a refuge fo...
Source: MSF News - May 30, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Syrian Refugees in Jordan: The Limits of Assistance
Nearly half a million Syrians are now refugees in Jordan, making up a third of the 1.5 million people who have fled the conflict in Syria to neighbouring countries. More than 100,000 of them live in Zaatari camp, situated in the north of the country, less than 20 km from the Syrian border. Up until last month, one thousand refugees arrived daily at the camp, which has become the largest camp for Syrian refugees in the region.  “Thus far, the Jordanian government has made significant efforts to host refugees,” explained Antoine Foucher, Head of Mission for MSF in Jordan. “But the pressure caused by th...
Source: MSF News - May 29, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Syria Jordan Frontpage Refugees & IDPs NEWS Source Type: news

Yemen: Migrants Abused, Tortured by Smugglers
Yemen 2013 © Anna Surinyach Many migrants pass through Haradh town on their way to Saudi Arabia, whose border is just a few kilometers away. SANA’A, YEMEN/NEW YORK, MAY 1, 2013—Authorities in Yemen have freed more than one thousand migrants from Somalia and Ethiopia, many suffering from torture and sexual abuse while forcibly held by human smugglers, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), which has treated the migrants, said today. Since April 7, Yemeni authorities have freed 1,620 people held by smugglers in farms ...
Source: MSF News - May 1, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

More than 1,600 migrants released from smugglers' hands
Since April 7, Yemeni authorities have released 1,620 migrants who were held by smugglers in farms – some of them for months – in Haradh region, in the north of the country. Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is assisting these migrants, including 62 children and 142 women, and has referred 71 severely ill people to the MSF-run hospital in Al-Mazraq village, close to Haradh town. Most of the migrants referred to the Al-Mazraq hospital were victims of human trafficking, forced labour and slavery. They showed signs of torture and verbal, physical and sexual abuse from their capt...
Source: MSF News - April 30, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Yemen Frontpage NEWS Source Type: news

Yoga being used for social change in Yemen, Kenya
Groups including the African Yoga Project in Kenya, Sara Ishaq's yoga studio in Sana'a, Yemen, teaching yoga in new regions (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For East African women, moving from Cheetos to mushmush
Patricia Leigh BrownCarlos A. Moreno/California WatchThe gatherings are meant to help daughters of East African women to understand their heritage and to encourage mothers to adapt healthy versions of American favorites like quiche and pizza.SAN DIEGO– For many daughters, the kitchen contains their mother’s secrets. In the tumult of pots and pans, the pinches of sugar and salt, reside recipes perfected over time without cookbooks, experience and intuition the only guides.For East African daughters in City Heights, a neighborhood that is a major West Coast portal for refugees, the opportunity to cook twice a mon...
Source: http://californiawatch.org/topic/health-and-welfare/feed - March 25, 2013 Category: American Health Authors: Patricia Leigh Brown Tags: Health and Welfare Daily Report cooking East Africa food San Diego traditional arts Source Type: news

New award recognises five pioneering women scientists
A Yemeni health researcher and pioneer of a network for Arab women scientists is one of five recipients of a global science award. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - February 28, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Cold War is history. Now it's the Cool War | Observer editorial
New technology makes different kinds of low-level conflict far too easyConflicts are defined, in large part, by how they are fought and their technologies. The First World War we associate with gas and tanks and the earliest use of airpower; the Second World War with strategic bombing and the first use of nuclear weapons. Those technologies help define us as human beings, shape our experience and politics, mould our present fears. So what of the way our conflicts are being fought today?Last week, David Rothkopf, editor at large at Foreign Affairs and a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, ado...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 24, 2013 Category: Science Tags: War reporting Drones Military World news Technology UK news Weapons technology The Observer Science Editorials Comment is free Source Type: news

The Open and Rocky Road Post-2015
What values does a Yemeni journalist who fuelled the Arab Spring hold in common with a former principal of the U.S. National Security Council? And how in turn will they see eye to eye with a Jordanian queen, or the president of Indonesia? The subjects of this riddle are meeting in Monrovia as part of Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s 27-member High Level Panel of Eminent Person’s on the Post-2015 Development Agenda (HLP). The purpose of the HLP is to lead the discussion around a new framework, the post-2015 development agenda, to replace the expiring Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The HLP’s work will ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 31, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: George Gao Tags: Active Citizens Africa Aid Biodiversity Civil Society Climate Change Development & Aid Education Energy Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Gender Global Governance Green Economy Headlines Population Poverty & MDGs Source Type: news

Russian spy satellite tumbles to Earth: from the Guardian archive, 24 Jan 1983
By the time the satellite hit the sea it was believed to have disintegrated. The real hazard, however, lies further aheadCosmos 1402, the Russian spy satellite which has been out of control for more than a month, finally tumbled into the Indian Ocean last night, ending a day of anxiety for governments around the world.The main body of the maverick satellite, weighing some 3,000lb splashed into the sea about 900 nautical miles south-east of the British dependency of Diego Garcia at 22.21 GMT - one minute ahead of the final Pentagon prediction.By the time the satellite hit the sea it was believed to have disintegrated. The r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Nick Davies, Anthony Tucker Tags: Russia Satellites guardian.co.uk Oceans Editorial Space From the Guardian Source Type: news

Yemeni Women Struggle to Step Forward
Yemeni women have played an integral role in the protests against ex-President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s 33-year regime last year. But despite the country’s upcoming political ‘National Dialogue’ – brokered by Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries and intended to bring together a cross-section of Yemeni constituencies – females still face a wall of discriminatory laws and practices, and a status quo willing to enforce them. “Broken inside” is how a staff member describes Nadia, 25, at a Sanaa women’s shelter. From a rural, hilly village north of the capital, Nadia was for...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 5, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Rebecca Murray Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Civilisations Find Alliances Editors' Choice Featured Gender Gender Identity Gender Violence Global Governance Headlines Human Rights Middle East & North Africa Regional Categories Religion Women's Source Type: news

I Know Where Iā€™m Going
A couple weeks ago, our colleagues at the International Committee of the Red Cross shared a powerful short film, featuring a man who worked in South Yemen named Hussein Saleh. Through Mr. Saleh’s words, we learn about life in the conflict area and how the ICRC networks with the government and other parties. As a result, detainees held by a Jihadist group can be visited for the first time. Every time we find out there is a new faction, we visit in order to introduce the ICRC to them. We explain to them the ICRC is [a] neutral, humanitarian organization. The aim is the assist people during a conflict. We do meetings...
Source: Red Cross Chat - January 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Gloria Huang Tags: International Source Type: news

Smoke-free air policies need to be monitored: No level of exposure to second-hand smoke is safe
20 March 2012 WHO urges governments to protect the public from exposure to second-hand smoke by implementing 100% smoke-free air policies in all enclosed public places. This was a key recommendation of a report released today that measured levels of “second-hand smoke” in countries of the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region. In its call to action, WHO recommended that implementation of smoke-free laws in enclosed places be supported by monitoring compliance and providing guidelines for enforcement officials. The WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean collaborated with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School ...
Source: WHO EMRO - Press releases - May 2, 2012 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

Archaeologists strike gold in quest to find Queen of Sheba's wealth
A British excavation has struck archaeological gold with a discovery that may solve the mystery of where the Queen of Sheba derived her fabled treasuresA British excavation has struck archaeological gold with a discovery that may solve the mystery of where the Queen of Sheba of biblical legend derived her fabled treasures.Almost 3,000 years ago, the ruler of Sheba, which spanned modern-day Ethiopia and Yemen, arrived in Jerusalem with vast quantities of gold to give to King Solomon. Now an enormous ancient goldmine, together with the ruins of a temple and the site of a battlefield, have been discovered in her former territ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 12, 2012 Category: Science Authors: Dalya Alberge Tags: Archaeology Ethiopia World news Science UK news Source Type: news