Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

‘ My Daughter Won ’t Eat! ’ 3 Tips if Your Teen Struggles with Disordered Eating
So, its dinner time and you’ve been logging away hours at the stove preparing what you thought was your daughter’s favorite meal; mashed potatoes, steak, and green beans. She has always loved this meal. Ever since she was very young, her favorite food has been mashed potatoes. But this night is different, just like most of the nights the past 2 months. Sally, 13 years old, wont eat. You pray and hope each night will be better. Just maybe, she will have a few more bites than the night before. Sally sits down to eat and oh, no. She isn’t eating, again. She slowly moves her green beans around on the plate, p...
Source: World of Psychology - May 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marianne Riley, MA, NCC, LGPC Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Children and Teens Eating Disorders Health-related Parenting Self-Esteem Adolescence Body Image Disordered Eating Nutrition Self Care self-worth Source Type: blogs

Reflections from the Hill: How residents participate in advocacy
Advocacy on the Hill can be a challenging, since it’s never clear how much a single person or small group of people can impact an issue. However, that fact alone should never stop anyone from doing advocacy work. Jessica Isom, Nkemka Esiobu, and myself had met with Dr. John Krystal (chair of the Yale psychiatry department) regularly to discuss about an advocacy day at the Capitol. We were three psychiatry residents, trying to advocate for patient rights. We pinned down a date, and met monthly to discuss how and what to advocate for. Because of the turbulent and volatile political news, our core message shifted from o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 28, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/luming-li" rel="tag" > Luming Li, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Health reform Source Type: blogs

Seven Surprising Lessons a “Helicopter” Parent Learned from Her Asperger Child
I felt utterly helpless. There was something profoundly wrong with my daughter, but I couldn’t help her — me the trained psychologist, the one with the master’s degree in social work and a doctoral degree in psychology. But this was long before the Asperger’s Syndrome diagnosis became official in the United States. (Now it’s classified as a high functioning form Autism Spectrum Disorder.) I began wondering about Bianca’s social skills by the end of first grade. She never seemed to play with other children and actually shunned them if they got too rambunctious. I dismissed my concerns and...
Source: World of Psychology - May 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathy J. Marshack, PhD Tags: Aspergers Autism Children and Teens Parenting Personal Psychology Psychotherapy Stories Self-Help Asperger Syndrome Asperger's disorder Autism Spectrum Child Development Education helicopter parenting Social Skills Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: May 27, 2017
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! If you’re here in the States, I hope you’re enjoying your long holiday weekend; however, before you hit the outdoors take a moment to check out the latest in this week’s mental health news! Learn about mindfulness-focused childbirth, why it’s important for veterans to help other veterans with mental health, how one of the most well-known billionaires today achieves happiness, and more. Mindfulness-Focused Childbirth Education Leads to Less Depression: A new study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of California, San Francisco (U...
Source: World of Psychology - May 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Children and Teens College Ethics & Morality Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Military Mindfulness Psychiatry Psychology Around the Net Success & Achievement Technology Treatment American Psychiatric Association Barry Goldwat Source Type: blogs

Putting the Health and Care in Healthcare
Red, white, and blue. The blue represents Americans’ collective mood. Is it our work-centric culture? Our reticence to discuss mental health? Our collective independence? Regardless the U.S. stands for Under Stress. But why are we so unhappy — at least compared to our Scandinavian brethren? Denmark and Norway top Forbes’ list of the world’s 10 happiest countries. The two countries pace CNBC’s list as well. By comparison, the stars and stripes check in at #15, lagging behind, umm, Costa Rica. The U.S. is an economic powerhouse; our personal incomes are steadily increasing too. But we are runn...
Source: World of Psychology - May 26, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Matthew Loeb Tags: Health-related Personal Policy and Advocacy Stress affordable care act Health Care Health Insurance Healthcare Reform life expectancy Medicine Single Payer unemployment uninsured universal health insurance Source Type: blogs

Current State of Telemedicine
As we previously reported, the CHRONIC Care Act of 2017 was introduced by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch and Ranking Member Ron Wyden, along with Johnny Isakson and Mark Warner, the co-chairs of the Committee’s Chronic Care Working Group. The bill is largely unchanged from the previous version, which was introduced in December 2016. The bill will have an especially large impact on telehealth services in the United States by allowing MA plans the ability to include telehealth services; gives some ACOs the opportunity to provide telehealth services; gives those receiving dialysis treatments at home the a...
Source: Policy and Medicine - May 26, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

We Aren ’ t Bored We Are Overwhelmed. Explain Adult ADHD
We Aren’t Bored We Are Overwhelmed. By Sue Kerstetter Part of #ExplainAdultADHD.  A campaign to reduce the ignorance, misinformation, and stigma against adults with ADHD.   “We Aren’t Bored We Are Overwhelmed Myth: ADHDers struggle with boredom Truth: Many of us often confuse being bored with being stagnated by the racing of our thoughts. We often say we are bored when what we actually mean is that we are lacking enough stimulation to keep up with our brains. This is why the mundane is so tough. It doesn’t satisfy our need for stimulation.” By Sue Kerstetter   Pl...
Source: Adult ADD Strengths - May 25, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Pete Quily Tags: Explain Adult ADHD To Non-ADHD Adults Source Type: blogs

Gaslighting in the Medical Literature
Have you felt that your sense of reality has been challenged lately? That the word “truth” has no meaning any more? Does the existence ofalternative facts make you question your own sanity? In modern usage, the termgaslighting refers to  “a form of psychological abuse in which false information is presented to the victim with the intent of making him/her doubt his/her own memory and perception”.Gaslighting is a form of manipulation that seeks to sow seeds of doubt in a targeted individual or members of a group, hoping to make targets question their own memory, perception, and sanity. Using pers...
Source: The Neurocritic - May 25, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 183
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the  183rd edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains  5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Jus...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 24, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Airway Emergency Medicine R&R in the FASTLANE Toxicology and Toxinology EBM Education literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Ketamine: A Miracle Drug for Depression?
A team of researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently discovered why the drug ketamine may act as a rapid antidepressant. Ketamine is best known as an illicit, psychedelic club drug. Often referred to as “Special K” or a “horse tranquilizer” by the media, it has been around since the 1960s and is a staple anesthetic in emergency rooms and burn centers. In the last 10 years, studies have shown that it can reverse — sometimes within hours or even minutes — the kind of severe, suicidal depression that traditional antidepressants can’...
Source: World of Psychology - May 24, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Medications Research addictive Bipolar Disorder dissociative anesthetic Drug Abuse Ketamine Major Depressive Disorder Mood Disorder Mood Stabilizer Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs

Mental Health Innovation and Dr. Tom Insel: from the NIMH to Google/ Verily Life Sciences to Startup Mindstrong
— Former Alphabet exec is working on an idea to detect mental health disorders by how you type on your phone (CNBC): “Can a smartphone detect whether a user is suicidal or depressed? That’s the promise of an exploding number of mental health entrepreneurs, who are exploring opportunities to monitor users’ smartphone behavior to detect a variety of symptoms — all with their consent. Dr. Thomas Insel joined Verily, Alphabet’s life sciences unit, less than two years ago to do just that. Insel, a psychiatrist and the former chief of the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health, was tasked wi...
Source: SharpBrains - May 24, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology -google behavior depressed entrepreneurs innovation mental health disorder Mental-Health Mindstrong NIMH psychiatrist smartphone startup suicidal symptoms Verily Life Sc Source Type: blogs

Where money and the law intersect, truth can sometimes be the victim
Afterword from a story entitled “Litigation Lane,” excerpted from Beyond Bedlam’s Door: True Tales from the Couch and Courtroom (Thunder Lake Press).  Forensic psychiatry involves the interface of psychiatry and the law. Over the years, I was asked to psychiatrically evaluate people in the context of civil litigation. Both plaintiff and defense attorneys retained my services to determine if an accident or incident that was the subject of a lawsuit involved psychiatric injury. The people suing could be rape victims where a landlord had not provided adequate security in a building; or people who had be...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mark-rubinstein" rel="tag" > Mark Rubinstein, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Specialist Source Type: blogs

How are we supposed to deal with death?
December 2012, three days before Christmas. It started as an ordinary day, but soon it would become the turning point of my career. As I entered my office, I noticed a different energy in the room. The receptionist looked at me and said, “Doc, one of your patients died last night.” As a psychiatrist, I am not used to the feelings generated when someone you cared for, passes in the prime of their life. I had just seen him the week before. I rush to look at my last progress note that read: “Even though the patient is deeply grieving the loss of his wife, he firmly denies suicidal thoughts and finds strength...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/karla-a-viera" rel="tag" > Karla A. Viera, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)
AACAP partners with our members in advocacy efforts at the federal and state levels to improve policies and services for children and adolescents with mental illness. We work to educate policymakers and administrators about issues affecting child and adolescent psychiatry and children’s mental health and regularly engage our members on pertinent legislation and regulatory activities. AACAP continually develops resources for members to use as they communicate with policymakers about issues related to child and adolescent psychiatry and children’s mental health. Make your voice heard on behalf of children with me...
Source: PsychSplash - May 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Clyde Tags: Articles Books Child and Adolescent Clinicians Collaborative News Community and Social Networking Conferences Counselling Depression DVDs and Videos Features For Foundation Website Group Management Mental Health Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Study: Common medication treatments for PTSD can increase the risk of developing dementia
—– Drugs for PTSD linked to increased risk of dementia (The Pharmaceutical Journal): “Certain psychotropic drugs used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increase the risk of developing dementia, including in patients who do not have PTSD but take the drugs for other conditions, study results published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society… As expected, a diagnosis of PTSD was found to significantly increase the risk of a dementia diagnosis…the results show that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, novel antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics increa...
Source: SharpBrains - May 22, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness antidepressants antipsychotics benzodiazepines dementia dementia risk drugs geriatrics medication-treatment post-traumatic-stress-disorder psychotropic psychotropic medication PTSD selec Source Type: blogs

Being mindful about mindfulness
I’m generally a supporter of mindfulness practice. It’s been a great discipline for me as I deal with everyday life and everything. I don’t admit to being incredibly disciplined about “making time for meditation” every day – that is, I don’t sit down and do the whole thing at a set time each day – but I do dip in and out of mindfulness throughout my day. While I’m brushing my teeth, slurping on a coffee, driving, sitting in the sun, looking at the leaves on the trees, cuddling my Sheba-dog I’ll bring myself to the present moment and take a couple of minutes to be ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 21, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Relaxation Resilience/Health Science in practice acceptance mindfulness persistent pain willingness Source Type: blogs

How President Trump may be radicalizing Muslim children
“We don’t want them here.” President Trump could not have sent a clearer message to Muslim children around the world. In the eyes of our nation’s elected leader, these kids are not wanted in the United States. Trump’s immigration policies have been focused on keeping “radical Islamic terrorists” out of the United States, but research in child psychiatry suggests that his rhetoric and policies have the potential to backfire, creating a hotbed for terrorists both at home and abroad. What’s even more frightening — these new terrorists may very well be children. According t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jack-turban" rel="tag" > Jack Turban < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: May 20, 2017
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net takes a look at how human psychology is costing us money, how walking and creativity might have developed together, how anger and depression are connected, and more. Enjoy! Your Psychology Is Costing You Money: Here’s How To Fight Back: Does human psychology make playing the “waiting game” look more attractive to us, and how could we benefit from choosing to wait rather than choosing instant gratification? Why We Shouldn’t Stigmatize Mentally Ill Prisoners: Dr. Elizabeth Ford, Chief of Psychiatry for Correctional Health Serv...
Source: World of Psychology - May 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Anger Children and Teens Creativity Depression Grief and Loss Memory and Perception Money and Financial Psychology Psychology Around the Net body brain childhood grief Communication Crimi Source Type: blogs

What do physical gait, movement, and apparent drive tell us about each other?
Two sisters (religious order, not biological relation, as far as I know) live in one of the condos across from us. They are very nice, older ladies, warm and pleasant, always ready with a kind word and a smile as they see others in the complex come and go. They seem, at least on casual observation, to lead very busy lives. They rise early, heading out to do whatever it is sisters do in the world nowadays. One drives a minivan, one a small, nondescript sedan. All pretty ordinary, I suppose, except for one thing that always strikes me about one of them. Sister gets up early most mornings. She almost always beats me out of th...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 19, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/greg-smith" rel="tag" > Greg Smith, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Mothers and Substance Use
By Christopher Welsh, MD Women have some unique challenges when it comes to alcohol, tobacco and drug use and misuse. These differences are based on both biology and culturally defined expectations of women. Hormonal changes, the menstrual cycle, fertility issues, pregnancy, breastfeeding and menopause can all impact a woman’s use of substances. Women often use smaller amounts of a substance for shorter amounts of time before developing a problem. They also may have greater physical problems from their substance misuse. Alcohol, tobacco and drug use during pregnancy can present significant problems for both the ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Health Tips Source Type: blogs

Is Suicide Contagion Real?
With the popularity of the Netflix hit teenage high school show, “13 Reasons Why,” there’s been some debate among mental health care professionals and researchers as to whether an actual “suicide contagion” exists. Would such a contagion effect apply to something like a fictional TV series? Is suicide contagion a real thing? And if so, is it really something we need to be concerned about as much in this day and age of instant entertainment and information available on the Internet, where people’s graphic depictions of self harm and suicide stories are always just a single click away for ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Celebrities Children and Teens General Minding the Media Research Suicide Technology 13 Reasons Why depiction of suicide is suicide contagious suicidal contagion Suicide contagion suicide in movies suicide on tv Source Type: blogs

Why Johnny Never Finishes Things. Explain Adult ADHD
Why Johnny Never Finishes Things By Charles Part of #ExplainAdultADHD.  A campaign to fight ignorance, misinformation, and stigma about adult ADHD. “Why Johnny Never Finishes Things When they’re hyper-focused, nobody beats an Adder! ADD, to me, is a memory problem, and the tendency to hyper-focus merely an adaptation. The ADDER knows, at some level, that if they don’t finish the current task now, they’re likely not going to remember to come back to it. An ADDER usually has an astounding number of unfinished projects that will testify to this fundamental truth, and they don’t want yet ano...
Source: Adult ADD Strengths - May 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Pete Quily Tags: Explain Adult ADHD To Non-ADHD Adults Source Type: blogs

How Faith Helps Depression
This study links the protective benefit of spirituality or religion to previous studies that identified large expanses of cortical thinning in specific regions of the brains of adult offspring of families at high risk for major depression. A previous study by Miller and her team published in September 2011 in The American Journal of Psychiatry showed a 76 percent decrease in major depression in adults who said they highly valued spirituality or religiosity, and whose parents suffered from the disease. Faith Assigns Meaning to Suffering All religious traditions, especially the Jewish and Christian f...
Source: World of Psychology - May 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Research Spirituality Belief Bipolar Disorder Faith Religion Source Type: blogs

Myth: I Space Out Because I Don ’ t Care. Explain Adult ADHD
Myth: I Space Out Because I Don’t Care. By Bruce Part of #ExplainAdultADHD. Crowdsourcing ADHD adults to help reduce ignorance and stigma by non-ADHD adults against our fellow adults with ADHD. Share the most important point you want non-ADDers to know about what it’s really like living with Adult ADHD, I post it on my blog & share it on social media with the hashtag #ExplainAdultADHD and encourage others to share it. Anonymously or full name. “Myth: I Space Out Because I Don’t Care. By Bruce. Actually: – I do generally want to be polite and listen. – Even when i...
Source: Adult ADD Strengths - May 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Pete Quily Tags: Explain Adult ADHD To Non-ADHD Adults Source Type: blogs

Mental health and new models of care: lessons from the vanguards
This report draws on recent research with vanguard sites in England, conducted in partnership with the Royal College of Psychiatrists. It finds that where new models of care have been used to remove the barriers between mental health and other parts of the health system, local professionals saw this as being highly valuable in improving care for patients and service users. It concludes that there remains much to be done to fully embed mental health into integrated care teams, primary care, urgent and emergency care pathways, and in work on population health.ReportBlog Nine principles for success: integrating mental health ...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - May 18, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Join Us At APA!
It's days away: the American Psychiatric Association's Annual Meeting will be in San Diego.  I'd like to tell you about the talks we'll be involved in and invite you to come listen and participate. Please do come say hello!--------------------To search for sessions by topic or presenter, go to this link:http://s4.goeshow.com/apa/annual/2017/itinerary_planner.cfm Session ID: 3019 Symposium Outpatient Commitment: A Tour of the Practices Across States Date: Tuesday, May 23 Time: 8:00 AM –11:00 AM Speakers: Chair: Dinah Miller (Maryland) Presenter: Ryan C. Bell, M.D., J.D. (New York State) Presenter: Kimbe...
Source: Shrink Rap - May 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

The Reality of Conversion Disorder
Stress is widely defined as a constraining force or influence. Sooner or later, it affects everyone. Most of the time, it’s temporary, but what happens when it’s not? Long term emotional stress can frequently occur with past trauma, producing a series of real and sometimes dangerous medical consequences. Often times a patient who is suffering from severe pain and does not receive a medical diagnosis, fears that a doctor may label the situation as “Just stress”. But when “Just stress” manifests physically, it should be handled with just as much care as any physically produced injury or di...
Source: World of Psychology - May 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders Dissociative Stress Anxious Thoughts Conversion Disorder Dissociation functional neurological symptom disorder Hysteria hysterical blindness stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Hunting and Attention. Explain Adult ADHD
Hunting and Attention by John Martyn Part of #ExplainAdultADHD. Crowdsourcing ADHD adults to help reduce ignorance and stigma by non-ADHD adults against our fellow adults with ADHD. Share the most important point you want non-ADDers to know about what it’s really like living with Adult ADHD, I post it on my blog & share it on social media with the hashtag #ExplainAdultADHD and encourage others to share it. Anonymously or full name. Hunting and Attention “Hunting – ADD’s are great hunters because they TAKE EVERYTHING IN. This attribute is great for tracking down business conn...
Source: Adult ADD Strengths - May 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Pete Quily Tags: Explain Adult ADHD To Non-ADHD Adults Source Type: blogs

I had depression, and my fellow doctors treated me horribly
I have lived for some time with depression. Most of the time, it is nagging in the background, helped by exercise, family and friends. But a few times, despite my best efforts, it has gotten out of control. At the middle of my chief year in November, it came to a head. I was under tremendous pressure to apply for fellowship when I didn’t think it was what was best for me, while simultaneously trying to save a failing relationship and manage hours and responsibilities that only increased throughout my training. At one point all I could do was wake up, make it to the hospital 10-minutes late, work a 14-hour day and ret...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 16, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anonymous" rel="tag" > Anonymous < /a > Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Loneliness May Increase Dementia Risk, Heart Attacks and Stroke
A study published in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry has found that people who feel lonely are significantly more at risk for developing dementia. The study, headed by Tjalling Jan Holwerda of the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, found that participants who reported feeling lonely, no matter how many friends and family surrounded them, were more likely to experience dementia than those who didn’t feel lonely. The team focused on approximately 2,200 older adults living in Amsterdam, ages 65 to 86. None of the participants exhibited signs of dementia and none of them lived in facil...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 16, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

3 Things to Know about Mother-Child Relationships
By Sarah Edwards, DO Healthy moms = healthy children and families. Healthy moms are essential to building children’s healthy brains and helping everyone in the family grow well and love well. Maternal depression, anxiety and stress can affect how a mother interacts and develops a relationship with her baby. Babies need a safe and stable connection with a caregiver for social, emotional and cognitive development. If this attachment is not strong, it can have lasting effects on a child’s brain, and puts children at risk for behavior and emotional problems. Family bonding is key to a healthy family. The good news...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health Health Tips Kids Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Sorrow
“Sorrow comes to all… Perfect reality is not possible, except with time. You cannot now realize that you will ever feel better and yet you are sure to be happy again.” – Abraham Lincoln Sorrow is the opposite of happiness, yet both are part of human existence. Like life and death and the changing of seasons, it should be familiar enough to recognize that things have a sequence. Sometimes that sequence is a time of birth or rebirth, a creative force that erases failure and negativity. Other times, however, there’s a clearly defined sense of decay, lack of progress, mistakes and endings. The ke...
Source: World of Psychology - May 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Depression Family Grief and Loss Happiness Inspiration & Hope Marriage and Divorce Self-Help Breakups Broken Heart grieving Sadness Seasonal Affective Disorder Source Type: blogs

Looking for Empathy in All the Wrong Places: Bizarre Cases of Factitious Disorder
art byZdzis ław BeksińskiFactitious disorder is a rare psychiatric condition where an individual deliberately induces or fabricates an ailment because of a desire to fulfill the role of a sick person. This differs from garden varietymalingering, where an individual feigns illness for secondary gain (drug seeking, financial gain, avoidance of work, etc.). The primary goal in factitious disorder is to garner attention and sympathy from caregivers and medical staff.The psychiatric handbookDSM-5 identifiestwo types of factitious disorder:Factitious Disorder Imposed on Self (formerly known asMunchausen syndrome when the feign...
Source: The Neurocritic - May 14, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: May 13, 2017
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers the psychology of to-do lists, why a high self-esteem doesn’t mean you’ll be successful, a genetic location related to anorexia nervosa, and more. The Psychology of the To-Do List: Why Your Brain Loves Ordered Tasks: Dr. David Cohen believes those of us who live by our to-do lists love them because they tone down anxiety, provide us with structure, and show proof of what we’ve achieved for the day, week, or month. A Psychologist Explains Why Self-Esteem Is a ‘Sham’: At least in terms of success. According to psy...
Source: World of Psychology - May 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Anorexia Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Disorders Eating Disorders Health-related Psychology Psychology Around the Net Research Self-Esteem Technology Anorexia Nervosa anxiety celiac disease Dr. David Cohen Genetics Source Type: blogs

6 Ways to Ensure You Don ’t Miss Out on Your Opportunities
“The way in which people miss their opportunities is melancholy.” – Elizabeth von Arnim It’s a sad and terrible thing to be engulfed in melancholy. Fortunately, for most of us, such a devastating emotional state is rare and temporary. Anyone who remains lost in sadness for an extended period should seek professional help. Everyone else must find effective ways to overcome melancholy and get on with their lives. This is most important for any number of reasons, not the least of which is that when you’re mired in melancholy, you’ll miss opportunities. Don’t miss your opportunities be...
Source: World of Psychology - May 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Depression General Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration Self-Esteem Success & Achievement goals Melancholy missing out Mood Disorder Opportunity Sadness Source Type: blogs

MDCalc Launches Long-Awaited Android App: Exclusive Interview
MDCalc, makers of popular online clinically useful calculators, has been around for over 12 years, and is still owned and run by the two practicing docs who founded it, Dr. Graham Walker and Dr. Joe Habboushe. Interestingly, MDCalc has seen its largest growth in the past three years, adding dozens of new calculators and swelling its number of users. As the founders quickly pointed out, while speaking with Medgadget, they have traditionally included only the most reliable and validated scores, knowing full well that other services often include everything under the sun, which may be confusing to doctors. The iOS versio...
Source: Medgadget - May 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Exclusive Net News Source Type: blogs

Help people let go of struggling and move toward valued living
She didn’t seem obviously depressed as I entered the room. “So, we have you taking a good dose of both antidepressants now,” I said. “How are you doing?” “I feel about the same.” “Have you done anything lately that could have made you feel a little better?” “I’m not sure …” Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 12, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/a-country-doctor" rel="tag" > A Country Doctor, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Virtual Human Patients Effective for Practicing for Difficult to Present Diagnoses
For many doctors, being able to have a compassionate but frank discussion with a newly diagnosed patient is one of the most difficult parts of the job. Medical Cyberworlds, a Madison, Wisconsin firm, developed interactive software called MPathic-VR that lets medical students and clinicians practice difficult interactions. The software actually looks and listens to the user in order to produce a natural conversational flow with a virtual patient on the screen. As an example, the patient in the video below gets quite emotional at a poor presentation of a diagnosis, but with proper demeanor and respect given, she is calmed do...
Source: Medgadget - May 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Accepting Repetitive Alzheimer's Behavior as the New Normal
It was only after I finally understood that the behaviors my mother was engaging in were normal for a person living with Alzheimer's disease that I was able to finally accept Alzheimer's.I contemplated the problem for years.how can you stop a person that has Alzheimer's disease from asking the same question over and over?How can you stop a person living with Alzheimer's disease fromengaging in the same behaviors over and over?Help me.10 Things a Person Living with Dementia Would Tell You If They CouldBy Bob DeMarcohttp://www.alzheimersreadingroom.comWe enlisted the advice of a geriatric psychiatrist to help us come up with...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - May 10, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's awareness alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Dementia care of dementia patients at home caregiving dementia care family caregiving memory care facility searches related to alzheimer's Source Type: blogs

What I Would Do Differently if I Were Diagnosed with Depression Today?
Someone in recovery circles once told me that if you have one foot in the past and another in the future, you are essentially peeing on the present. I try to remember that when I’m engulfed in regret — obsessing about all the things I did wrong in the past and wishing to God I had made different decisions. However, writing about my mistakes has always been healing for me because I’d like to think this small action could possibly prevent someone else from making the same ones. If I can help a young person or anyone who has recently been diagnosed with depression take a more direct route to healing, it seem...
Source: World of Psychology - May 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Medications Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Psychiatry Stress Suicide Treatment Bipolar Disorder Depressive Episode Epigenetics Major Depressive Disorder Melancholy Neuroplasticity Sa Source Type: blogs

What this medical student learned after working with foster children
During my two years off from medical school, I’ve been volunteering as a court appointed special advocate for children in the foster care system. And I’ve spent a lot of time reading about how these kids’ experiences could affect the rest of their lives. The seminal research on this happened in the late 1990s using data from more 17,000 Kaiser patients. What the researchers found was that patients who reported more adverse childhood experiences were more likely to suffer from such long-term medical conditions as heart disease, liver disease, stroke, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 9, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/natalia-birgisson" rel="tag" > Natalia Birgisson < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Negotiated Rates: What No One Talks About in Health Care Legislation
Last week, the House of Representatives passed legislation for the American Health Care Act, the first step in repealing the Affordable Care Act, or as some would call it, Trumpcare versus Obamacare.  The American Psychiatric Association and the American Medical Association (and many other medical societies) oppose the new legislation.  An enormous concern is that the new legislation won't require insurance companies to cover preexisting conditions, or require coverage for mental health treatment or prenatal/maternity care.  Over the coming years, the new legislation is predicted to leave 24 million more Ame...
Source: Shrink Rap - May 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

The truth about long-term antidepressant use
A great piece today in the Guardian by Aida Edemariam. Good to see such a comprehensive piece of reporting in the mainstream media. This what you and I know has happened to many of us, but at the same time GSK continues to deny is a major health crisis because of Seroxat (and other SSRIs). In the UK, as the High Court action moves ever closer to trial, GSK and their expensive legal team still have their collective head in the sand – at least that’s their public stance. I believe that for many years GSK has known about the problems Seroxat causes while you take it, about the terrible problems...
Source: seroxat secrets... - May 6, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Anti-depressant David Healy GSK Seroxat SSRI Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: May 6, 2017
Happy Saturday, Psych Central readers! May is Mental Health Awareness Month (or, “Mental Health Month”), but of course you knew that, didn’t you? Whether or not you did, Mental Health America (which started Mental Health Month way back in 1949) has provided a ton of information for individuals and organizations to help them promote mental health awareness this month. There’s even a handy dandy toolkit you can download. Go check it out and get busy this month! But before you do, check out this week’s Psychology Around the Net which covers political correctness personalities, how Alzheimer&rsqu...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Alzheimer's Antidepressant Caregivers Children and Teens Depression Disorders Medications Personality Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychology Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Technology World Mental Health D Source Type: blogs

It ’s time for psychodynamically informed clinical thinking
In a world of diverse mental health treatments and treatment settings, psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy have lost their former prominence.  Only a small fraction of patients have the time, money, and interest to engage in long-term, open-ended mental exploration — even if doing so would get to the root of their problems and lead to lasting improvement. More commonly, emotional distress is dealt with in emergency departments, in crisis clinics, on the medical and surgical floors of hospitals, in short-stay psychiatric inpatient units, and in non-clinical setti...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 5, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/steven-reidbord" rel="tag" > Steven Reidbord, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

There she was, hanging in our closet
No matter how well the one you love ornaments your life, they should never be an ornament. Meaning — you should never have to find them hanging in the closet like it’s some tree where each broken branch represents sadness, sickness and issues that only make sense in hindsight. That metaphorical tree was as astonishing as Christmas morning yet as terrible as a Halloween horror. And although surreal — like Dali painted some sort of twisted, melted reality on my wall — it suddenly made sense. You see, five minutes prior, I was sitting in bed less than fifteen feet from the disaster. I had the usual hea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 4, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jacqueline-cory-russo" rel="tag" > Jacqueline Cory Russo < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 180
This article reviews lavage cases called in to a state poison center and finds that while numbers are down, many of the ones performed were inappropriate. Bottom line, better education needs to be done to stress when and where it’s useful. Ingestions within 60 minutes of presentation of enough drug to have a serious toxic effect and where there’s no available antidote should prompt consideration for lavage in conjunction with a toxicologist when possible. Recommended by: Anand Swaminathan Toxicology Nelson CJ et al. Morbidity and mortality associated with medications used in the treatment of depress...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Education General Surgery Infectious Disease Intensive Care Microbiology R&R in the FASTLANE Resuscitation Social Media Toxicology Toxicology and Toxinology critical care Emergency Medicine literature recommendations research a Source Type: blogs

Maternal Mental Health Matters
MAY 3, 2017 IS WORLD MATERNAL MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS DAY #maternalMHmatters Today is World Maternal Mental Health Awareness Day, and we’re helping to bring attention to an important health issue and available treatment options. Worldwide, as many as one in five women experience some type of perinatal mood and anxiety disorder (PMAD). PMADs include postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety, postpartum obsessive compulsive disorder and others. “There is still this myth that pregnancy is blissful and if you don’t enjoy pregnancy and having your baby, there’s something wrong with you,” says Patri...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 3, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Women's Health anxiety disorder maternal mental health mood disorder patricia widra PMAD Source Type: blogs

Mental Health Awareness Month
May is Mental Health Awareness Month. In researching this yearly event I was surprised to learn that it started back in the 1940’s as a weekly observance and eventually expanded to include the entire month of May. In 2013, then President Barack Obama signed a proclamation stating his commitment to mental health and confirming May as National Mental Health Awareness Month. Each year there is a different theme. Some past themes include What Mental Illness Feels Like, and Pathways to Wellness. This year’s theme is Risky Business. Mental Health America, the organization that started Mental Health Awareness Month, ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Mental Disorder Mental Health Awareness Mental Illness Psychiatry Psychology Stigma stigmatizing Source Type: blogs