TV Could Sway Viewers to Prefer Thinner Women: Study
THURSDAY, Dec. 19, 2019 -- People who watch lots of TV prefer thinner women, which suggests that TV can influence opinions about preferred body shapes, researchers say. Their study included 299 men and women in a remote area of Nicaragua, in Central... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 19, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Adolescent dating violence among Nicaraguan youth - Litz K, Holvoet N.
This study examines the rates of victimization and perpetration of physical, sexual, and psychological dating violence among a sample of 193 ever-partnered Nicaraguan adolescents. FINDINGS reveal high levels of partner violence, with 20% of student... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Study: After trade deal, unhealthy foods flowed into Central America, Dominican Republic
(University at Buffalo) The study analyzes the availability of non-nutritious food in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic in the years after the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) was signed between those countries and the US, going into effect in 2006. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Influence of the history of abuse and suicidal attempts behavior among women victims of violence in Nicaragua - Rivas E, Bonilla E, V ázquez JJ.
This study examines the relationship between the history of abuse and suicide at... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Sterilized Workers Seek to Collect Damages Against Dow Chemical in France
A pesticide made by Dow Chemical sterilized thousands of banana workers in Nicaragua decades ago. In an unusual legal move, they are turning to France to enforce payment. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Liz Alderman Tags: Workplace Hazards and Violations Bananas Pesticides Chemicals Human Rights and Human Rights Violations Chiquita Brands International Inc Dow Chemical Company European Union France Nicaragua Source Type: news

A New World? Are the Americas Returning to Old Problems?
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Sep 12 2019 (IPS) When I in 1980 first arrived in America it was a new world to me. I went from New York to Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic and like so many visitors and migrants before me I was overwhelmed by both familiar and strange impressions. Familiar due to books I had read and movies I had seen, strange since I encountered unexpected things and new because both I and several of those I met compared themselves to the “old world”, i.e. Euroasia and parts of Africa. A sense of uniqueness, admiration for an assumed freshness and difference, can be discerned in the wri...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Livelihoods, precarity, and disaster vulnerability: Nicaragua and Hurricane Mitch - Loebach P.
How livelihoods determine vulnerability to disasters is a recent topic of inquiry. Few quantitative works have been produced to date. The empirical analysis that follows draws on household-level data available for Nicaragua, preceding and following Hurrica... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Community-based policing in Nicaragua: do the claims of communitarian, proactive and preventative hold true? - McNeish JA, Prado SM, Ehrlich HF.
Until the wave of political violence in 2018, the Nicaraguan model for community-based policing (COP) was viewed by many as the means by which the country had avoided the crime and insecurity reported elsewhere in Central America. Paralleling these positiv... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

"Regardless, you are not the first woman": an illustrative case study of contextual risk factors impacting sexual and reproductive health and rights in Nicaragua - Luffy SM, Evans DP, Rochat RW.
BACKGROUND: Rape, unintended pregnancy, and abortion are among the most controversial and stigmatized topics facing sexual and reproductive health researchers, advocates, and the public today. Over the past three decades, public health practicioners and hu... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

An Escalating War on Reproductive Rights
A demonstrator in Buenos Aires wears a T-shirt with the slogan "my body, my rights," one of the slogans of the so-called green tide - the colour adopted by the movement for the legalisation of abortion, which is beginning to spread to other Latin American countries. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Jun 3 2019 (IPS) Abortion has long been a contentious issue across the world, and the debate is only heating up, prompting women to stand up and speak out for their reproductive rights. In response to increasingly restrictive policies, civil society is taking action to help protect ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Featured Gender Global Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse North America Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Abortion Center for Reproductive Rights (CRR) Human Rights Watch (HRW) Source Type: news

NIH-supported study reveals a novel indicator of influenza immunity
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A study of influenza virus transmission in Nicaraguan households reveals new insights into the type of immune responses that may be protective against influenza virus infection, report investigators. The findings could help scientists design more effective influenza vaccines and lead to the development of novel universal influenza vaccines. The research was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 3, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How A " Vital Station " Is Motivating Nicaraguans To Care About Their Health  
Many Nicaraguans have a reactive approach to healthcare, visiting a doctor only when they are very sick. Social entrepreneur Marcos Lacayo set up Estaci ón Vital to change that. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 27, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ashoka, Contributor Source Type: news

BU: Central American kidney disease epidemic linked to occupational heat exposure
(Boston University School of Medicine) For two decades, Nicaragua and El Salvador have seen increasing mortality from an unusual form of chronic kidney disease (CKD), also called Mesoamerican Nephropathy (MeN). The disease has disproportionately affected sugarcane and other agricultural workers, and appears to be unrelated to traditional kidney disease risk factors such as diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

As citizen scientists, farmers can make important contributions to climate adaptation
(Bioversity International) To help smallholder farmers adapt to climate change, scientists need to provide recommendations of crop varieties suitable to farmers' marginal and heterogeneous environments. However, existing on-farm approaches are difficult to scale. A novel scalable method using crowdsourced citizen science was employed on 12,409 trial plots in Ethiopia, India and Nicaragua. The results showed the potential of crowdsourced citizen science to improve variety recommendations and help farmers respond to climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dengue immunity may be protective against symptomatic Zika, study finds
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Children with a history of prior dengue virus infection had a significantly lower risk of being symptomatic when infected by Zika virus, according to a study in Nicaragua of more than 3,000 children aged 2 to 14 years. Experts have worried that prior dengue virus infection could exacerbate severe Zika disease. However, the new findings, published in PLOS Medicine, indicate that prior dengue immunity in children may in fact be protective against symptomatic Zika disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Consequences of the exposure to abuse in the family of origin among victims of intimate partner violence in Nicaragua - Rivas E, Bonilla E, V ázquez JJ.
This study examines the risk of experiencing stressful life events (SLE) during the liv... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Universities 'held hostage' in Nicaragua's political crisis
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Wade, L. Tags: Latin American News, Scientific Community In Depth Source Type: news

Obesity spreads influenza: Overweight people take twice as long to recover from the flu
(Natural News) An epidemiologic study conducted by researchers from America and Nicaragua showed that obesity increases the period needed for a patient to recover. Their research, which was published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, monitored around 1,700 people from 320 households in Nicaragua for three flu seasons from 2015 to 2017. The participants, which included... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clams and cockles, sentinels of the environmental status of Nicaraguan coasts
(University of the Basque Country) In collaboration with the National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, a research group from the UPV/EHU's Plentzia Marine Station has studied the bivalves in the mangroves on both coasts of Nicaragua in order to analyse how they are affected by the pollution brought down by the rivers. That way, it will be possible to use them as sentinels or indicators of environmental changes. The research has been published by the journal Science of the Total Environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Br óderes in arms: gangs and the socialization of violence in Nicaragua - Rodgers D.
Drawing on longitudinal ethnographic research that has been ongoing since 1996, this article explores the way that gangs socialize individuals into violent norms and practices in Nicaragua. It shows how different types of gang violence can be related to di... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Hurricane Michael Strengthens Into Category 2 As it Barrels Towards Florida
MIAMI — Hurricane Michael swiftly intensified into a Category 2 over warm Gulf of Mexico waters Tuesday amid fears it would strike Florida on Wednesday as a major hurricane. Mandatory evacuations were issued as beach dwellers rushed to board up homes just ahead of what could be a devastating hit. A hurricane hunter plane that bounced into the swirling eye off the western tip of Cuba found wind speeds rising. By 8 a.m. Tuesday, top winds had reached 100 mph (155 kph), and it was forecast to strengthen more, with winds topping 111 mph (179 kph), capable of causing devastating damage. Gov. Rick Scott warned people acro...
Source: TIME: Science - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

New Project Will Bring High-Quality HIV Services to the People Who Need Them Most in Five Central American Countries
August 07, 2018​IntraHealth International will expand its HIV prevention, care, and treatment efforts in Central America with a new $15 million award from the U.S. Agency for International Development. The Strengthening Care and Treatment Cascade Project will help El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama improve the quality and reach of their HIV services and allocate more resources where they are most needed.While the overall HIV prevalence is low in these countries, the epidemic is concentrated among key groups, including men who have sex with men, transgender women, and female sex workers. Despite these...
Source: IntraHealth International - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

Obesity extends duration of influenza a virus shedding
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Obesity, which increases influenza disease severity, also extends by about 1.5 days how long influenza A virus is shed from infected adults compared to non-obese adults, according to a multi-year study of two cohorts of Nicaraguan households. The findings implicate chronic inflammation caused by obesity as well as increasing age as reasons for extended viral shedding, which puts others at risk of infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Clinical and neurosurgical management of cranial machete injuries: the experience of a tertiary referral center in Nicaragua - Zapata L, Wright EJ, Nakaji P.
We present our experience managing cranial machete injuries in Nicaragua over a 5-year ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

How Trump ’s Immigration Policies Could Hurt Senior Care
When Norma was recently injured in a car accident, she had to take time off from her job caring for a 93-year-old woman in California’s San Fernando Valley. While she was away, her client fell down and ended up hospitalized. It’s the kind of danger that the elderly face without home care, something that has Norma concerned about her absence. “I think of it as if I’m caring for my own grandmother or mother,” she says. But Norma worries that even after she is able to return to work, she won’t be able to stay on the job for long for a very different reason: her immigration status. Norma, wh...
Source: TIME: Health - May 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Aging Donal Trump Healthcare Immigration Source Type: news

‘La Charla’: The impact of one YSN alumnus in Nicaragua
As a Downs Fellow in Nicaragua, Simone Ippoliti ’16 M.S.N. examined the impact of sexual and reproductive health intervention on the rates of teen pregnancy. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 10, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Occupational Safety Grows in Latin America, Except Among Young People
Young municipal workers wear uniforms and other protective equipment while cutting the grass in the Praça Paris park in the Gloria neighbourhood in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The lack of training and the breach of safety requirements by their employers make young Latin Americans the most vulnerable to accidents at work. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetRIO DE JANEIRO, Apr 27 2018 (IPS)Despite progress achieved in occupational safety in Latin America, the rates of work-related accidents and diseases are still worrying, especially among young people, more vulnerable in a context of labour flexibility an...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories International Labour Organisation (ILO) workplace safety Source Type: news

Occupational Safety Improves in Latin America, Except Among Young People
Young municipal workers wear uniforms and other protective equipment while cutting the grass in the Praça Paris park in the Gloria neighbourhood in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The lack of training and the breach of safety requirements by their employers make young Latin Americans the most vulnerable to accidents at work. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetRIO DE JANEIRO, Apr 27 2018 (IPS)Despite progress achieved in occupational safety in Latin America, the rates of work-related accidents and diseases are still worrying, especially among young people, more vulnerable in a context of labour flexibility an...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories International Labour Organisation (ILO) workplace safety Source Type: news

Vaccination: three women in Nicaragua take a different journey towards a common goal
April 2018 Karla Bethania Ortiz, 26, from Comarca Bosque de Xilo á, Nicaragua, never understood why she was not vaccinated as a child. Unlike her friends, she did not have a vaccination card. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: immunization [subject], vaccination, vaccines [subject], vaccine, vaccine safety, vaccine quality, Feature [doctype], Nicaragua [country], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

Good Intentions, Bad Habits: Reforming Mental Healthcare In LatAm
The Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region is a vast patchwork of countries, cultures and ethnicities with a total population of more than 645 million, ranging from 209 million-plus in Brazil to islands with fewer than 100,000 inhabitants.The diversity is also economic; recent years have seen marked improvements in income distribution and a burgeoning middle class, particularly in countries such as Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru and Nicaragua. Yet, LAC remains the region with the highest levels of income inequality worldwide.All of this has a significant bearing on the state of mental health, where good intentions and...
Source: EyeForPharma - April 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Marc Yates Source Type: news

Police seek man in university nursing student's death
Police investigating death of New York nursing student say they want to question man who had previous relationship with her and flew to Nicaragua before her body was found (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - March 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Judges in Nicaragua learn to see the world through the eyes of vulnerable women
ESTELI, Nicaragua – At only 19, Michelle Zeled ón, from the north of Nicaragua, has been through a lot. She watched her father beat her mother, and endured years of his verbal abuse. “One time, during the Holy Week, my dad tried to kill my mother,” she told UNFPA.When she becamepregnant at age 15, he cut off all support.She took a job in a tobacco company, where she works from 6:30 am to 10:30 pm to support her daughter, now 4 years old. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

Antibody-dependent enhancement of severe dengue disease in humans
For dengue viruses 1 to 4 (DENV1-4), a specific range of antibody titer has been shown to enhance viral replication in vitro and severe disease in animal models. Although suspected, such antibody-dependent enhancement of severe disease has not been shown to occur in humans. Using multiple statistical approaches to study a long-term pediatric cohort in Nicaragua, we show that risk of severe dengue disease is highest within a narrow range of preexisting anti-DENV antibody titers. By contrast, we observe protection from all symptomatic dengue disease at high antibody titers. Thus, immune correlates of severe dengue must be ev...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Katzelnick, L. C., Gresh, L., Halloran, M. E., Mercado, J. C., Kuan, G., Gordon, A., Balmaseda, A., Harris, E. Tags: Epidemiology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Research in Nicaragua inspires career path for recent YSPH graduate
A study that Cara Safon conducted as an M.P.H. student led to two published articles and a plan to continue maternal child health research in the future. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tropical Storm Nate Could Threaten U.S. Gulf Coast as a Hurricane
Tropical Storm Nate, which has been forming across the southern Caribbean, could strengthen into a low-grade hurricane and is on track to hit the U.S. Gulf Coast, and possibly Florida, by this weekend. The storm, which currently has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, is expected to move through northeastern Nicaragua and eastern Honduras on Thursday, according to a Oct. 5 public advisory by the National Hurricane Center. It might reach sustained Category 1 winds of 85 mph in three days as it approaches the Gulf Coast on Saturday. “Strengthening is likely over the northwestern Caribbean Sea Thursday night and Friday,&...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

When laws are not enough: violence against women and bureaucratic practice in Nicaragua - Neumann P.
This article draws on feminist theories of the state to analyze how the routine practices of low-level state bureauc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Provider perspectives on intimate partner violence in Bluefields, Nicaragua - Laughon K, Mitchell E, Price J.
BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence represents a significant public health problem and a substantial human rights' issue for women and girls throughout the world. Design and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to answer these research questions: What ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

The True Story Behind the Movie American Made
American Made, the new Tom Cruise crime drama out Sept. 29, has all the makings of a romp: drug running and arms smuggling. An FBI sting. Enough cold, hard cash to make the phenomenon of raining money a plausible ecological scenario. And a sex scene in the cockpit of a plane. That’s flying through the air. With one participant being the pilot. Did we mention it’s Tom Cruise? If it sounds like an exercise in screenwriting excess, it’s not entirely — the film takes as its inspiration the true story of Adler Berriman “Barry” Seal, a TWA pilot who became a drug smuggler for the Medellí...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliza Berman Tags: Uncategorized movies tom cruise Source Type: news

Review: American Made Lets a Smug Tom Cruise Just Be Tom Cruise
The trademark Tom Cruise character is the cat that eats the canary, looks around to make sure everyone knows how awesome he is for getting away with eating said canary–and then eats 10 more. Cruise was practically born to star in Doug Liman’s American Made as Barry Seal, a onetime TWA pilot from Louisiana who smuggled drugs for the Medellín cartel before becoming a DEA informant. In real life, Seal got away with all kinds of audaciousness, though the odds did catch up with him: he was murdered, in 1986, by Medellín assassins. In American Made, Barry gets away with even more. We watch as he goes to...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephanie Zacharek Tags: Uncategorized movies tom cruise Source Type: news

Mercury Mining Awaits International Control in Mexico
Artisanal gold mining in Latin America uses mercury, a practice that should be modified in countries that have ratified the international Minamata Convention for the control of this toxic metal. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPSBy Emilio GodoyMEXICO CITY, Sep 26 2017 (IPS)For environmentalist Patricia Ruiz the only word that comes to mind is “devastating,” when describing the situation of mercury mining in her home state of Querétaro in central Mexico.“There are a large number of pits (from which the mercury is extracted), and there are the tailing ponds containing mining waste, all of which drains i...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emilio Godoy Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources Regional Categories gold mining mercury Mexico Minam Source Type: news

Wait-and-see strategy pays off, incentives needed for risk takers
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Some people are quick to purchase the latest technology or sign up for a new service. Others adopt a wait-and-see strategy. A recent study by University of Illinois economist Hope Michelson, finds this is true for farmers in Nicaragua who enter into contracts with Walmart. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Is Hispanic Heritage Month?
Hispanic Heritage Month is an official celebration of American citizens whose ancestry can be traced back to Spain, Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. When is Hispanic Heritage Month? The festival now lasts from September 15 to October 15 every year, but it first started out as just a week long celebration of in 1968. Twenty years later, in 1988 it expanded to dedicate a whole four weeks for the celebration of being Hispanic. The celebration starts in the middle of the month, as opposed to the end, because the 15th marks the independence days of five Latin America countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guate...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized hispanic heritage month onetime Smithsonian Source Type: news

Vancouver Firefighter Drives Donated Ambulance to First Responders in Nicaragua
VANCOUVER, Canada (CTV Vancouver) - A firefighter from Metro Vancouver will soon embark on a road trip to Nicaragua to deliver a decommissioned ambulance to first responders, a journey he hopes will spark a wider conversation about giving new life to used emergency equipment.  In about three weeks, Erik Vogel and his wife plan to hop into the donated ambulance, which is loaded with everything from scalpels to stretchers, and head for Central America. "It's something we've always wanted to do. It's a bucket list item," Vogel said. The couple is part of an ongoing campaign called Operation Nicaragua, which sta...
Source: JEMS Operations - September 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: CTV Vancouver Tags: News Videos Operations Source Type: news

Springer Nature pioneers charitable incentive system for peer reviewers
For every peer review completed for the journal Environmental Earth Sciences, a water filter is donated to developing countries – almost 600 since the start of 2017 Peer reviewers are enabling people in developing countries to access safe drinking water as the result of a collaboration between Springer’s journal Environmental Earth Sciences and the non-profit humanitarian organization “Filter of Hope”. Since the start of the initiative at the beginning of 2017, almost 600 water filters have been distributed in Liberia, Nicaragua, Haiti, Honduras, Russia, Cuba and India. This scheme is the first of i...
Source: News from STM - September 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

Springer Nature pioneers charitable incentive system for peer reviewers
(Springer) Peer reviewers are enabling people in developing countries to access safe drinking water as the result of a collaboration between Springer's journal Environmental Earth Sciences and the non-profit humanitarian organization 'Filter of Hope.' Since the start of the initiative at the beginning of 2017, almost 600 water filters have been distributed in Liberia, Nicaragua, Haiti, Honduras, Russia, Cuba and India. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Retraction of complaints among female victims of intimate partner violence living in poverty in Nicaragua - V ázquez JJ, Rivas E, Suarez AC, Panadero S.
This article describes a study of 136 female victims of physical IPV living in poverty in Nicaragua, one of the countries with t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Kidney Failure Deaths Move Filmmaker to Raise Research Funds Kidney Failure Deaths Move Filmmaker to Raise Research Funds
When a filmmaker shooting in Nicaragua learned that people are dying of kidney disease of unknown etiology, he was so inspired that he now works with physicians and studies epidemiology.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology News Source Type: news

The Sound of Public Services
Dan Hagerty, Scott Williams and Chris ‘Slim’ Morgan are collectively known as The Sandanistas. They all hail from Tredegar in Wales and have known each other for years. Dan’s first impression of Scott wasn’t exactly positive though. “We met at a battle of the bands competition when we were all younger,” he says. “The first time I saw Scott – am I allowed to swear? ­­– his band were on first and after he finished he kicked the drums all over the stage. And I thought, what a complete knob.” They’ve since bonded and have played together for years, but n...
Source: UNISON Health care news - August 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Rosa Ellis Tags: Magazine Cymru Wales education services local government water environment and transport youth worker Source Type: news

Summer program at UCLA helps build more diverse pipeline for health care field
For many college students, the summer break means basking at the beach, traveling to exotic locales or just hanging out with friends. But this summer meant something quite different to a dedicated group of college students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Thanks to a free program offered by the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, these students took part in a six-week summer program to further their dreams of becoming health care professionals.“I was ecstatic about this opportunity and couldn’t wait to get involved,” said Nahun Flores, a 29-year-old who attends Chaffey College in Rancho Cucamonga, abo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Professor and surgeon leads medical mission to Nicaragua with Hand Help
Hand Help Inc. travels to Central America to provide highly specialized surgeries that are difficult or impossible to obtain in less-developed countries. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - July 27, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news