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Antibody-dependent enhancement of severe dengue disease in humans
For dengue viruses 1 to 4 (DENV1-4), a specific range of antibody titer has been shown to enhance viral replication in vitro and severe disease in animal models. Although suspected, such antibody-dependent enhancement of severe disease has not been shown to occur in humans. Using multiple statistical approaches to study a long-term pediatric cohort in Nicaragua, we show that risk of severe dengue disease is highest within a narrow range of preexisting anti-DENV antibody titers. By contrast, we observe protection from all symptomatic dengue disease at high antibody titers. Thus, immune correlates of severe dengue must be ev...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Katzelnick, L. C., Gresh, L., Halloran, M. E., Mercado, J. C., Kuan, G., Gordon, A., Balmaseda, A., Harris, E. Tags: Epidemiology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Research in Nicaragua inspires career path for recent YSPH graduate
A study that Cara Safon conducted as an M.P.H. student led to two published articles and a plan to continue maternal child health research in the future. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tropical Storm Nate Could Threaten U.S. Gulf Coast as a Hurricane
Tropical Storm Nate, which has been forming across the southern Caribbean, could strengthen into a low-grade hurricane and is on track to hit the U.S. Gulf Coast, and possibly Florida, by this weekend. The storm, which currently has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, is expected to move through northeastern Nicaragua and eastern Honduras on Thursday, according to a Oct. 5 public advisory by the National Hurricane Center. It might reach sustained Category 1 winds of 85 mph in three days as it approaches the Gulf Coast on Saturday. “Strengthening is likely over the northwestern Caribbean Sea Thursday night and Friday,&...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

When laws are not enough: violence against women and bureaucratic practice in Nicaragua - Neumann P.
This article draws on feminist theories of the state to analyze how the routine practices of low-level state bureauc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Provider perspectives on intimate partner violence in Bluefields, Nicaragua - Laughon K, Mitchell E, Price J.
BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence represents a significant public health problem and a substantial human rights' issue for women and girls throughout the world. Design and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to answer these research questions: What ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

The True Story Behind the Movie American Made
American Made, the new Tom Cruise crime drama out Sept. 29, has all the makings of a romp: drug running and arms smuggling. An FBI sting. Enough cold, hard cash to make the phenomenon of raining money a plausible ecological scenario. And a sex scene in the cockpit of a plane. That’s flying through the air. With one participant being the pilot. Did we mention it’s Tom Cruise? If it sounds like an exercise in screenwriting excess, it’s not entirely — the film takes as its inspiration the true story of Adler Berriman “Barry” Seal, a TWA pilot who became a drug smuggler for the Medellí...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliza Berman Tags: Uncategorized movies tom cruise Source Type: news

Review: American Made Lets a Smug Tom Cruise Just Be Tom Cruise
The trademark Tom Cruise character is the cat that eats the canary, looks around to make sure everyone knows how awesome he is for getting away with eating said canary–and then eats 10 more. Cruise was practically born to star in Doug Liman’s American Made as Barry Seal, a onetime TWA pilot from Louisiana who smuggled drugs for the Medellín cartel before becoming a DEA informant. In real life, Seal got away with all kinds of audaciousness, though the odds did catch up with him: he was murdered, in 1986, by Medellín assassins. In American Made, Barry gets away with even more. We watch as he goes to...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephanie Zacharek Tags: Uncategorized movies tom cruise Source Type: news

Mercury Mining Awaits International Control in Mexico
Artisanal gold mining in Latin America uses mercury, a practice that should be modified in countries that have ratified the international Minamata Convention for the control of this toxic metal. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPSBy Emilio GodoyMEXICO CITY, Sep 26 2017 (IPS)For environmentalist Patricia Ruiz the only word that comes to mind is “devastating,” when describing the situation of mercury mining in her home state of Querétaro in central Mexico.“There are a large number of pits (from which the mercury is extracted), and there are the tailing ponds containing mining waste, all of which drains i...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emilio Godoy Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources Regional Categories gold mining mercury Mexico Minam Source Type: news

Wait-and-see strategy pays off, incentives needed for risk takers
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Some people are quick to purchase the latest technology or sign up for a new service. Others adopt a wait-and-see strategy. A recent study by University of Illinois economist Hope Michelson, finds this is true for farmers in Nicaragua who enter into contracts with Walmart. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Is Hispanic Heritage Month?
Hispanic Heritage Month is an official celebration of American citizens whose ancestry can be traced back to Spain, Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. When is Hispanic Heritage Month? The festival now lasts from September 15 to October 15 every year, but it first started out as just a week long celebration of in 1968. Twenty years later, in 1988 it expanded to dedicate a whole four weeks for the celebration of being Hispanic. The celebration starts in the middle of the month, as opposed to the end, because the 15th marks the independence days of five Latin America countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guate...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized hispanic heritage month onetime Smithsonian Source Type: news

Vancouver Firefighter Drives Donated Ambulance to First Responders in Nicaragua
VANCOUVER, Canada (CTV Vancouver) - A firefighter from Metro Vancouver will soon embark on a road trip to Nicaragua to deliver a decommissioned ambulance to first responders, a journey he hopes will spark a wider conversation about giving new life to used emergency equipment.  In about three weeks, Erik Vogel and his wife plan to hop into the donated ambulance, which is loaded with everything from scalpels to stretchers, and head for Central America. "It's something we've always wanted to do. It's a bucket list item," Vogel said. The couple is part of an ongoing campaign called Operation Nicaragua, which sta...
Source: JEMS Operations - September 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: CTV Vancouver Tags: News Videos Operations Source Type: news

Springer Nature pioneers charitable incentive system for peer reviewers
For every peer review completed for the journal Environmental Earth Sciences, a water filter is donated to developing countries – almost 600 since the start of 2017 Peer reviewers are enabling people in developing countries to access safe drinking water as the result of a collaboration between Springer’s journal Environmental Earth Sciences and the non-profit humanitarian organization “Filter of Hope”. Since the start of the initiative at the beginning of 2017, almost 600 water filters have been distributed in Liberia, Nicaragua, Haiti, Honduras, Russia, Cuba and India. This scheme is the first of i...
Source: News from STM - September 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

Springer Nature pioneers charitable incentive system for peer reviewers
(Springer) Peer reviewers are enabling people in developing countries to access safe drinking water as the result of a collaboration between Springer's journal Environmental Earth Sciences and the non-profit humanitarian organization 'Filter of Hope.' Since the start of the initiative at the beginning of 2017, almost 600 water filters have been distributed in Liberia, Nicaragua, Haiti, Honduras, Russia, Cuba and India. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Retraction of complaints among female victims of intimate partner violence living in poverty in Nicaragua - V ázquez JJ, Rivas E, Suarez AC, Panadero S.
This article describes a study of 136 female victims of physical IPV living in poverty in Nicaragua, one of the countries with t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Kidney Failure Deaths Move Filmmaker to Raise Research Funds Kidney Failure Deaths Move Filmmaker to Raise Research Funds
When a filmmaker shooting in Nicaragua learned that people are dying of kidney disease of unknown etiology, he was so inspired that he now works with physicians and studies epidemiology.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology News Source Type: news

The Sound of Public Services
Dan Hagerty, Scott Williams and Chris ‘Slim’ Morgan are collectively known as The Sandanistas. They all hail from Tredegar in Wales and have known each other for years. Dan’s first impression of Scott wasn’t exactly positive though. “We met at a battle of the bands competition when we were all younger,” he says. “The first time I saw Scott – am I allowed to swear? ­­– his band were on first and after he finished he kicked the drums all over the stage. And I thought, what a complete knob.” They’ve since bonded and have played together for years, but n...
Source: UNISON Health care news - August 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Rosa Ellis Tags: Magazine Cymru Wales education services local government water environment and transport youth worker Source Type: news

Summer program at UCLA helps build more diverse pipeline for health care field
For many college students, the summer break means basking at the beach, traveling to exotic locales or just hanging out with friends. But this summer meant something quite different to a dedicated group of college students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Thanks to a free program offered by the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, these students took part in a six-week summer program to further their dreams of becoming health care professionals.“I was ecstatic about this opportunity and couldn’t wait to get involved,” said Nahun Flores, a 29-year-old who attends Chaffey College in Rancho Cucamonga, abo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Professor and surgeon leads medical mission to Nicaragua with Hand Help
Hand Help Inc. travels to Central America to provide highly specialized surgeries that are difficult or impossible to obtain in less-developed countries. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - July 27, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Multipartner Fertility in Nicaragua: Complex Family Formation in a Low-Income Setting
CONCLUSIONMultipartner fertility is a critical demographic and social phenomenon that may contribute to and reflect important gender and family structure inequalities in Nicaragua. Mothers with multipartner fertility may be at especially high risk of raising children without the children's fathers and with low levels of economic support. (Source: The Guttmacher Institute)
Source: The Guttmacher Institute - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Guttmacher Source Type: news

US would join only Syria and Nicaragua on climate accord 'no' list
Only other UN members not party to Paris agreement never signed up, but for reasons of war and principle, not disbeliefAssuming the US does,as expected, pull out of the historic Paris agreement on climate change, it will join a very small list of countries with which it has little else in common in terms of emissions.The only other UN members not signed up are Nicaragua and Syria, which both chose not to enter into the climate accord in the first place.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Paris climate agreement US politics Climate change scepticism Syria Nicaragua Greenhouse gas emissions Environment Science US news World news COP 21: UN climate change conference Paris Global climate talks Source Type: news

US joins only Syria and Nicaragua on climate accord 'no' list
Only other UN members not party to Paris agreement never signed up, but for reasons of war and principle, not disbeliefDonald Trump ’s decision to pull out of the Paris agreement on climate change means the US joins only two other countries not signed up to the historic accord.The only other UN members not signed up are Nicaragua and Syria, which both chose not to enter into the climate accord in the first place.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Paris climate agreement US politics Climate change scepticism Syria Nicaragua Greenhouse gas emissions Environment Science US news World news COP 21: UN climate change conference Paris Global climate talks Source Type: news

Nicaragua Didn ’t Sign the Paris Agreement Because It Didn’t Go Far Enough
If President Donald Trump decides to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement, as he is now expected to do, America would find itself in unfamiliar territory. Of the 197 nations in the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, only two declined to sign the accord: Syria and Nicaragua. Syria has been embroiled in civil war for six years, and was not expected to sign the deal, in which nations committed to setting targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Nicaragua, though, took a public stand against the 2015 agreement — and it was for the opposite reason President Trump has given in his pledges to wit...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Begley Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Use of the Poisson log-linear model for the study of homicides against young Nicaraguan immigrants in Costa Rica - Bonilla RE.
OBJECTIVE: To describe the homicides rate for young Nicaraguan immigrants in Costa Rica. METHODS: We used a Poisson log-linear regression model at small administrative areas-level to describe the homicides rate for young Nicaraguan immigrants in Co... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Montana's Melting Glaciers On Pace To All But Disappear 'Within 20 Years'
Grinnell Glacier towered roughly 30 feet over scientist Dan Fagre when he began studying the ice 26 years ago. Now, when he hikes through Montana’s Glacier National Park, the ancient ice wall’s dark, craggy edge barely reaches his shins. “It’s just a remnant of its former self,” the U.S. Geological Survey research ecologist told HuffPost by phone on Thursday. “As the glacier shrinks, all the rock and debris in it stay. The glacier keeps getting dirtier and dirtier.” Glaciers, synonymous with slowness, are retreating at a rapid pace ― particularly in the Treasure State. Since...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers advance low-cost, low-tech Zika virus surveillance tool
Using loop-mediated isothermal amplification, or LAMP, researchers found that they could easily detect Zika virus in human and mosquito samples from the United States, Brazil and Nicaragua. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers advance low-cost, low-tech Zika virus surveillance tool
(Colorado State University) Using loop-mediated isothermal amplification, or LAMP, researchers found that they could easily detect Zika virus in human and mosquito samples from the United States, Brazil and Nicaragua. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 3, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UNC, Duke receive $3M from CDC for Zika test
A team of researchers from the UNC School of Medicine and Duke University, as well as the University of Vermont and the University of Nicaragua-Le ón, has been awarded a $3.2 million contract to partner with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on new Zika work. The public health-focused work will be aimed at the development of new virus-detecting tests that measure antibody levels rather than viral components, according to a n announcement from UNC. “The virus seems to clear out… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 24, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

UNC, Duke researchers receive $3M from CDC
A team of researchers from the UNC School of Medicine and Duke University, as well as the University of Vermont and the University of Nicaragua-Le ón, has been awarded a $3.2 million contract to partner with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on new Zika work. The public health-focused work will be aimed at the development of new virus-detecting tests that measure antibody levels rather than viral components, according to a n announcement from UNC. “The virus seems to clear out… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 21, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

UNC, Duke researchers receive $3M from CDC
A team of researchers from the UNC School of Medicine and Duke University, as well as the University of Vermont and the University of Nicaragua-Le ón, has been awarded a $3.2 million contract to partner with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on new Zika work. The public health-focused work will be aimed at the development of new virus-detecting tests that measure antibody levels rather than viral components, according to a n announcement from UNC. “The virus seems to clear out… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 21, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

This Cafe Is Staffed Entirely By Deaf People
GRANADA, Nicaragua ― When we walked into the cafe, we were greeted by a waitress who smiled, held out a menu, and pointed to a table. It’s only when we asked for “una mesa para seis,” or a table for six, that we realized something was a bit different: The waitress glanced at our group and held up six fingers. That’s because she ― and all the other staff ― are deaf. Last month, The Huffington Post visited Café de las Sonrisas (“Smiles Cafe”) in Granada. The business only employs people who are deaf, from the waiters to the cooks. “My goal is for this caf...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UNC Student Josie Caves Granted the Raluca Iosif Intimate Partner Violence Research Award
Under the Raluca Iosif Intimate Partner Violence Research Award, Josie Caves will contribute to the academic body of knowledge related to fatal intimate-partner violence. Photo courtesy of Josie Caves.March 23, 2017The 2017Raluca Iosif Intimate Partner Violence Research Award has been granted to Josie Caves, a doctoral student at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. The award will support Caves ’s research on the differing factors that contribute to intimate-partner violence that manifests as homicide as compared to homicide/suicide.IntraHealth Internat...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Haunted by the mystery deaths in Nicaragua ’s brutal sugarcane fields
Kidney disease has killed 20,000 agricultural workers, but no one knows whyTwo brothers stand in a dusty alley in the town of Chichigalpa in Nicaragua. They stare with suspicion atAustralian photographer Josh Mcdonald, who has just captured their image – a picture that won aWellcome Image awardlast week for its depiction of the impact of a medical condition that has been devastating the male population of central America.The illness is described as “chronic kidney disease of undetermined cause ” and it is responsible for 75% of deaths of young and middle-aged men in Nicaragua. Workers in the sugarcane ind...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Observer science editor Tags: Nicaragua Medical research Science Photography World news Source Type: news

The psychological impact of first burn camp in Nicaragua - Tropez-Arceneaux LL, Castillo Alaniz AT, Lucia Icaza I, Alejandra Murillo E.
Asociacion Pro-Ninos Quemados de Nicaragua (APROQUEN) is a comprehensive burn center that provides a holistic and integrated approach to treating burns. APROQUEN has set the standards internationally with acute treatment for burns, intensive care, reconstr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Three Killed in Late-Season Hurricane Otto; Costa Rica Evacuates Thousands
PANAMA CITY (AP) — Late-season storm Otto strengthened into a hurricane Tuesday as civil defense officials reported three deaths in Panama amid heavy rain and Costa Rica ordered the evacuation of 4,000 people from its Caribbean coast. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Otto was likely to gain strength as it headed for an expected Thursday afternoon landfall around the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border. It could become the first hurricane to make landfall in Costa Rica since reliable record-keeping began in 1851. The storm caused heavy rains in Panama as it moved off that nation's northern coast, and officials blamed O...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 22, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: News Major Incidents Source Type: news

Mosquitoes May Infect You With More Than One Disease In A Single Bite
As if disease-carrying mosquitoes weren’t bad enough in the first place, scientists have found the pesky insects may be able to infect us with two viruses at the same time.  A small lab study that exposed mosquitoes to blood infected with varying combinations of dengue, Zika and chikungunya proved that the mosquitoes were able to pick up two viruses — Zika and chikungunya — at the same time. The results suggest that human beings could be infected with both the Zika virus and the chikungunya virus in one bite, but researchers need to conduct more studies to find out how this affects a person&rsqu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bridges to Community to Build a Regional Health Center in Rural...
Bridges to Community Executive Director, John Hannan today announced plans to build a much needed regional health center outside of the municipality of Siuna, in north eastern Nicaragua, that will...(PRWeb September 25, 2016)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/09/prweb13711026.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - September 25, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Low back pain among office workers in three Spanish-speaking countries: findings from the CUPID study - Campos-Fumero A, Delclos GL, Douphrate DI, Felknor SA, Vargas-Prada S, Serra C, Coggon D, Gimeno Ruiz de Porras D.
OBJECTIVES: To assess the differences in the prevalence and incidence of low back pain (LBP) and associated disability among office workers in Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Spain. METHODS: Data were collected at baseline (n=947, 93% response) in Novemb... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Paul House obituary
Ethnobotanist who spent 30 years in Honduras working to protect the country ’s ecosystemsThe ethnobotanist Paul House, who has died of cancer aged 55, was fascinated by the interaction of human societies with their surrounding ecosystems, and always coupled social and environmental advocacy with scientific inquiry. He spent nearly 30 years inHonduras, working to understand and protect the country ’s ecosystems and inspiring a generation of young Honduran biologists.He carried out fieldwork in areas ranging from the cloud forests of the country ’s highest mountains to the dry thorn scrub of the interior va...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 23, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ian Walker and Adrian Barrance Tags: Biology Environment Science Plants Honduras Nicaragua Conservation Source Type: news

Twenty-six new species of minute litter bugs described in new book
(Entomological Society of America) A new book, " Pegs, Pouches, and Spines: Systematics and Comparative Morphology of the New World Litter Bug Genus Chinannus Wygodzinsky, 1948, " revises the genus Chinannus, and the authors describe 26 new species, expanding the known range to most countries between Nicaragua and Bolivia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

This Active Volcano Is Being Connected To The Internet For A Life-Saving Reason
The “Mouth of Hell” is coming online. Thanks to General Electric and filmmaker Sam Cossman, Masaya Volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in Nicaragua, may soon be connected to the internet. GE has partnered with Cossman, who’s made a name for himself as a “volcano diver,” and the Nicaraguan government to install dozens of Wi-Fi sensors inside Masaya, located about 13 miles outside the capital Managua. The goal? To monitor the volcano’s activities in real time and better predict when it might next erupt. Masaya poses “a real danger,” explained volcanologist Guillermo ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nonfatal traffic accidents related to alcohol in Le ón, Nicaragua 2004-2008 - Rocha J, Herrera A, Sapag J, Giesbrecht N, Mann R.
INTRODUCTION: ninety percent of traffic deaths occur in middle and low income countries and are a leading cause of mortality in young people. OBJECTIVES: describe the characteristics of patients with nonfatal injuries caused by traffic events relat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Evolutionary split up without geographic barriers
Evolutionary biologists have completed the most extensive study of sympatric speciation so far. They used around 20,000 characteristics of 450 fish to document the parallel evolution of cichlid fish in two crater lakes, Apoyo and Xiloá, in Nicaragua. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Evolutionary split up without geographic barriers
(University of Konstanz) Evolutionary biologists in Konstanz have completed the most extensive study of sympatric speciation so far. They used around 20,000 characteristics of 450 fish to document the parallel evolution of cichlid fish in two crater lakes, Apoyo and Xiloá, in Nicaragua. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 4, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Analysis of perceived risk among construction workers: a cross-cultural study and reflection on the Hofstede model - Martinez-Fiestas M, Rodríguez-Garzón I, Delgado-Padial A, Lucas-Ruiz V.
This article is a cross-cultural study on the perceived risk in the construction industry. Worker samples from three different countries were studied: Spain, Peru and Nicaragua. The main goal is to explain how construction workers perceive their occupation... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Dear Obama, Trudeau and Peña Nieto: Act Now to Save the Monarch Butterfly
MEXICO CITY -- More than 200 scientists, writers and artists have signed a letter addressed to Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, in advance of the North American Leaders' Summit in Ottawa later this month. The signers urge that swift and energetic actions be taken to save the monarch butterfly from the threats that endanger its survival. All three countries must work together to mitigate the loss of the butterflies' breeding habitat and to terminate all logging and mining in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Michoacan, Mexico. Amo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Nicaraguan Diet: Simple, Low-cost, Delicious and Nutritious
The mention of Nicaragua usually conjures thoughts of political instability and poverty but with the growth of tourism this perception is slowly changing. Nicaragua is fast becoming known as a beautiful land of lakes, volcanoes and beaches, however, it does not have a reputation as a culinary destination. Visitors to this Central American country do not expect to consume tasty food; to the contrary, concerns over what to eat may be high on their list. The reality is that the Nicaraguan diet is influenced by Spanish, Creole, and Indigenous cuisine, and although the dishes are simple, they are delicious, and for those wantin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Evaluating intimate partner violence and response system in León, Nicaragua: perspectives from survivors and stakeholders - Zelaya J.
Background Five out of 10 married women in Nicaragua have experienced physical or sexual abuse at some point during their marriage (Ellsberg et al., 1999). Surveys collected by 360 women in the department of León indicate that 52% of these women have e... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Respectable, disreputable, or rightful? Young Nicaraguan women's discourses on femininity, intimate partner violence, and sexual abuse: a grounded theory situational analysis - Salazar M, Goicolea I, Ohman A.
This situational analysis study aims to position the discourses that young Nicaraguan women use in their understanding of femininities, male intimate partner violence (IPV), and men's sexual violence toward women (SA). Eight focus group discussions with a ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

"It is better if I kill her": perceptions and opinions of violence against women and femicide in Ocotal, Nicaragua, after law 779 - Luffy SM, Evans DP, Rochat RW.
The objective of this research is to examine women's perceptions and opinions of violence against women (VAW) and femicide in Ocotal, Nicaragua, since the introduction of Law 779, a national law implemented in 2012 meant to eradicate VAW. From May to June ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Working to save endangered species in Nicaragua
A proposed canal project in Nicaragua that would connect the Caribbean Sea with the Pacific Ocean could seriously deplete and disrupt the habitats of a number of animals, including some that are endangered, say scientists. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news