Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Point-of-Care Therapies in Austere Environments
CONCLUSION: The current and future challenges of prolonged field care need to be addressed with new techniques, training, and technology. Ruggedized, deployable 3D printers allow for the direct fabrication of medical tools, supplies, and biological solutions for austere use. Delivery of packages can vary, and attention to routes and location is key, especially for transit of time-sensitive perishable supplies such as live cells. The significance of this study provides the real possibility to 3D print "just-in-time" medical solutions tailored to the need of an individual service member in any environment. This is a potentia...
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jason Barnhill Joel D Gaston Paul I Deffenbaugh Linzie Wagner Peter C Liacouras Vincent B Ho Source Type: research

Letter From the Executive Director Dr. John Cho
Mil Med. 2023 Feb 3:usac439. doi: 10.1093/milmed/usac439. Online ahead of print.NO ABSTRACTPMID:36734087 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usac439 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: John M Cho Source Type: research

Common Finger Injuries: Treatment Guidelines for Emergency and Primary Care Providers
CONCLUSIONS: Finger injuries are common in the military setting and presenting directly to an orthopedic surgeon does not appear the norm. Fingertip injuries, fractures within the hand, and finger dislocations can often be managed without the need for a subspecialist. By following simple guidelines with attention to "red flags," primary care providers can manage most of these injuries with short-term follow-up with orthopedics.PMID:36734106 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usad022 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tyler J Hunt Franklin J Powlan Kayleigh N Renfro Michael Polmear Reuben A Macias John C Dunn Matthew E Wells Source Type: research

Occupational Exposure to Nonionizing Radiation and Risk for Malignancy in Young Adults
CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not find an increased short-term risk for cancer in young adults exposed to NIR radiation as compared with unexposed young adults.PMID:36734118 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usad020 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Shachar Shapira Maya Nitecki Dorit Tzur Naama Schwartz Barbara G Silverman Oren Zack Limor Friedensohn-Zuck Source Type: research

Long-Term Health Care Costs for Service Members Injured in Iraq and Afghanistan
CONCLUSIONS: Combat injured patients have significantly higher long-term health care costs compared to their noninjured counterparts. If this random sample is extrapolated to the 53,251 total of combat wounded service members, it implies a total excess cost of $1.6 billion to date after adjustment for covariates and a median follow-up time of 10 years. These costs are likely to increase as injured veterans age and develop additional chronic conditions.PMID:36734126 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usad008 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ian J Stewart Shiva Ambardar Jeffrey T Howard Jud C Janak Lauren E Walker Eduard Poltavskiy Karl C Alcover Jessica Watrous Adi V Gundlapalli Warren B P Pettey Ying Suo Richard E Nelson Source Type: research

Stretching and Self-Myofascial Release in Helicopter Aircrew to Reduce Neck and Back Pain (Phase 1)
CONCLUSION: Aircrew back and neck pain because of flying is well documented. However, there is no standardized stretching protocol for aircrew to perform immediately preflight or postflight in U.S. Naval Aviation. This study demonstrated that PPS, a simple 5- to 7-min stretching routine, gives aircrew structure and can reduce postflight cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and overall pain. This phase proved to be safe as no adverse events were reported. The prehabilitation aspect could reduce conventional medical intervention, costly pharmacological management of neck and back pain, and be applied to other aviation populations in ...
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: James B Walsh Andrea F McGlynn Curtis L Hardy George C Armas Hadley M Sulpizio Martin R Wright Source Type: research

Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Point-of-Care Therapies in Austere Environments
CONCLUSION: The current and future challenges of prolonged field care need to be addressed with new techniques, training, and technology. Ruggedized, deployable 3D printers allow for the direct fabrication of medical tools, supplies, and biological solutions for austere use. Delivery of packages can vary, and attention to routes and location is key, especially for transit of time-sensitive perishable supplies such as live cells. The significance of this study provides the real possibility to 3D print "just-in-time" medical solutions tailored to the need of an individual service member in any environment. This is a potentia...
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jason Barnhill Joel D Gaston Paul I Deffenbaugh Linzie Wagner Peter C Liacouras Vincent B Ho Source Type: research

Letter From the Executive Director Dr. John Cho
Mil Med. 2023 Feb 3:usac439. doi: 10.1093/milmed/usac439. Online ahead of print.NO ABSTRACTPMID:36734087 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usac439 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: John M Cho Source Type: research

Common Finger Injuries: Treatment Guidelines for Emergency and Primary Care Providers
CONCLUSIONS: Finger injuries are common in the military setting and presenting directly to an orthopedic surgeon does not appear the norm. Fingertip injuries, fractures within the hand, and finger dislocations can often be managed without the need for a subspecialist. By following simple guidelines with attention to "red flags," primary care providers can manage most of these injuries with short-term follow-up with orthopedics.PMID:36734106 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usad022 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tyler J Hunt Franklin J Powlan Kayleigh N Renfro Michael Polmear Reuben A Macias John C Dunn Matthew E Wells Source Type: research

Occupational Exposure to Nonionizing Radiation and Risk for Malignancy in Young Adults
CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not find an increased short-term risk for cancer in young adults exposed to NIR radiation as compared with unexposed young adults.PMID:36734118 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usad020 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Shachar Shapira Maya Nitecki Dorit Tzur Naama Schwartz Barbara G Silverman Oren Zack Limor Friedensohn-Zuck Source Type: research

Long-Term Health Care Costs for Service Members Injured in Iraq and Afghanistan
CONCLUSIONS: Combat injured patients have significantly higher long-term health care costs compared to their noninjured counterparts. If this random sample is extrapolated to the 53,251 total of combat wounded service members, it implies a total excess cost of $1.6 billion to date after adjustment for covariates and a median follow-up time of 10 years. These costs are likely to increase as injured veterans age and develop additional chronic conditions.PMID:36734126 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usad008 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ian J Stewart Shiva Ambardar Jeffrey T Howard Jud C Janak Lauren E Walker Eduard Poltavskiy Karl C Alcover Jessica Watrous Adi V Gundlapalli Warren B P Pettey Ying Suo Richard E Nelson Source Type: research

Stretching and Self-Myofascial Release in Helicopter Aircrew to Reduce Neck and Back Pain (Phase 1)
CONCLUSION: Aircrew back and neck pain because of flying is well documented. However, there is no standardized stretching protocol for aircrew to perform immediately preflight or postflight in U.S. Naval Aviation. This study demonstrated that PPS, a simple 5- to 7-min stretching routine, gives aircrew structure and can reduce postflight cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and overall pain. This phase proved to be safe as no adverse events were reported. The prehabilitation aspect could reduce conventional medical intervention, costly pharmacological management of neck and back pain, and be applied to other aviation populations in ...
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: James B Walsh Andrea F McGlynn Curtis L Hardy George C Armas Hadley M Sulpizio Martin R Wright Source Type: research

Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Point-of-Care Therapies in Austere Environments
CONCLUSION: The current and future challenges of prolonged field care need to be addressed with new techniques, training, and technology. Ruggedized, deployable 3D printers allow for the direct fabrication of medical tools, supplies, and biological solutions for austere use. Delivery of packages can vary, and attention to routes and location is key, especially for transit of time-sensitive perishable supplies such as live cells. The significance of this study provides the real possibility to 3D print "just-in-time" medical solutions tailored to the need of an individual service member in any environment. This is a potentia...
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jason Barnhill Joel D Gaston Paul I Deffenbaugh Linzie Wagner Peter C Liacouras Vincent B Ho Source Type: research

Letter From the Executive Director Dr. John Cho
Mil Med. 2023 Feb 3:usac439. doi: 10.1093/milmed/usac439. Online ahead of print.NO ABSTRACTPMID:36734087 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usac439 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: John M Cho Source Type: research

Common Finger Injuries: Treatment Guidelines for Emergency and Primary Care Providers
CONCLUSIONS: Finger injuries are common in the military setting and presenting directly to an orthopedic surgeon does not appear the norm. Fingertip injuries, fractures within the hand, and finger dislocations can often be managed without the need for a subspecialist. By following simple guidelines with attention to "red flags," primary care providers can manage most of these injuries with short-term follow-up with orthopedics.PMID:36734106 | DOI:10.1093/milmed/usad022 (Source: Military Medicine)
Source: Military Medicine - February 3, 2023 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tyler J Hunt Franklin J Powlan Kayleigh N Renfro Michael Polmear Reuben A Macias John C Dunn Matthew E Wells Source Type: research