The Effect of Immediate Versus Delayed Port Access on 30-Day Infection Rate
This study compared the 30-day infection risk of chest ports accessed on the same day as placement and chest ports with delayed initial access. The aim was to evaluate a larger data set that provided evidence for the development of port access guidelines. A retrospective chart review of 3322 chest port placement procedures performed between October 15, 2003, and June 10, 2015, was conducted at the interventional radiology department of a single institution. Procedure notes and health records were reviewed to determine time of initial port access, evidence of infection within a 30-day window of port placement, and causal or...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - April 15, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Experience and Satisfaction of Cancer Patients With a Central Venous Catheter at a Tertiary Hospital in South Korea: Erratum
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - April 15, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Erratum Source Type: research

Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: Nursing Implications
Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is an unsolved and potentially life-compromising problem for most patients receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy. It manifests with numbness, tingling, and possibly neuropathic pain and motor and autonomic symptoms. This review aims to provide an evidence synthesis that prepares nurses to comprehensively assess, provide supportive care for, and critically evaluate the literature on CIPN. The prevalence, significance, characteristics, mechanisms, and risk factors of CIPN will be discussed, as well as nursing-relevant evidence on the assessment, prevention, and management of CIPN...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - April 15, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Risk of Patient Harm Related to Unnecessary Dilution of Ready-to-Administer Prefilled Syringes: A Literature Review
Unnecessary dilution of ready-to-administer (RTA) syringes could increase the risk of patient harm attributed to errors related to incorrect dose, improper labeling, and the potential for microbial contamination. Although published guidelines endorse the use of commercially available RTA syringes, recent surveys indicate that best practices are not always implemented. The purpose of this article is to review the existing literature and to assess the incidence and nature of errors related to the unnecessary dilution of RTA intravenous (IV) push medications in the inpatient clinical setting. The PubMed database was searched ...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - April 15, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Advances in Hereditary Angioedema: The Prevention of Angioedema Attacks With Subcutaneous C1-Inhibitor Replacement Therapy
Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a debilitating condition caused by a functional C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency and characterized clinically by episodes of subcutaneous or submucosal swelling. C1-INH replacement is highly effective for preventing HAE attacks and can improve health-related quality of life. Once available only for intravenous use, C1-INH is now available as a subcutaneous formulation for self-administration, shown to provide sustained plasma levels of C1-INH and reducing the monthly median HAE attack rate by 95% versus placebo in the phase 3 COMPACT study. Subcutaneously administered C1-INH satisfies multipl...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - April 15, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Occupational Exposure in Health Care Personnel to Antineoplastic Drugs and Initiation of Safe Handling in Hong Kong: A Literature Review
This article aims to provide a literature review on the occupational exposure of health care personnel to antineoplastic drugs and to reflect the current status in Hong Kong. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - April 15, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

The Role of the Registered Nurse in the Use of Intraosseous Vascular Access Devices
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - April 15, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features: Position Statement Source Type: research

2020 Year of the Nurse—Celebrate Nursing, Celebrate You
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - April 15, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Editorial Source Type: research

Continuing Education for Nursing Contact Hours and CRNI® Recertification Units
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - March 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Continuing Education Source Type: research

Experience and Satisfaction of Cancer Patients With a Central Venous Catheter at a Tertiary Hospital in South Korea
As cancer chemotherapy transitions from inpatient care to outpatient care, the number of patients who receive a central venous catheter (CVC) and the interest in CVCs as a safe intravenous administration route have increased recently in South Korea. The purpose of this study was to investigate the discomforts and satisfaction that cancer patients with a CVC may experience in daily activities as an outpatient and to provide rationale for nursing interventions. Data collection was conducted between April 11, 2011, and August 31, 2011. Forty-three questionnaires were collected, and a total of 41 questionnaires were used for t...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - March 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Strategies to Improve Outcomes
Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a debilitating and potentially life-threatening pregnancy disease marked by weight loss, malnutrition, and dehydration attributed to unrelenting nausea and/or vomiting; HG increases the risk of adverse outcomes for the mother and child(ren). The complexity of HG affects every aspect of a woman's life during and after pregnancy. Without methodical intervention by knowledgeable and proactive clinicians, life-threatening complications may develop. Effectively managing HG requires an understanding of both physical and psychosocial stressors, recognition of potential risks and complications, and p...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - March 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Compassionate Care of the Patient Who Uses Substances: Implications for the Infusion Nurse
This article provides the infusion nurse with the essential principles of compassionate care of the patient who uses substances. A fundamental understanding of how to work with patients who use substances may enhance the infusion nurse's practice. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - March 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Comparing Care of the Primary and Secondary Hemochromatosis Patients
Hemochromatosis is an imbalance of excessive serum iron and is a life-threatening condition if left untreated. Due to different causes, primary and secondary hemochromatosis have different patient care considerations for the infusion nurse. Understanding the pathophysiology and how the body absorbs iron is imperative for providing the highest quality care. Since primary (hereditary) hemochromatosis originates from a gene mutation, and secondary (acquired) from excessive intake, the treatment and education must be adjusted accordingly to deliver successful outcomes for both diagnoses. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - March 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Biosimilar Basics
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - March 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Pharmacology Report Source Type: research

Go the Extra Mile
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - March 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Editorial Source Type: research

Best Practice for Delivering Small-Volume Intermittent Intravenous Infusions
This study investigated the delivery of small-volume intermittent intravenous (IV) infusions. Laboratory protocol evaluated potential medication loss among 6 administration methods using 50- and 100-mL solutions. Significant variations existed in calculated medication loss depending on administration method and volume. Up to 35% of medication may not be administered due to residual volume, with the greatest percentage associated with 50-mL solutions. Results suggest that intermittent IV infusions should only be delivered as a secondary infusion through a primary infusion administration set with a continuous infusion or an ...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - January 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Challenges Associated With Vascular Access Needs of Patients With Factitious Disorder
Factitious disorder, formerly known as Munchausen syndrome, is a type of mental illness in which patients fabricate symptoms to gain attention or sympathy. When considering a patient with factitious disorder as a candidate for infusion therapy, the clinician must be aware of the challenges associated with providing an invasive treatment to high-risk patients while promoting safety. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - January 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Pain Perception of a Structured Vascular Access Team Approach to Short Peripheral Catheter (SPC) Placement Compared to SPC Placement by Bedside Nurses
This study investigates the use of a structured protocol by vascular access team (VAT) nurses compared with the practice of bedside nurses to minimize patient pain related to short peripheral catheter (SPC) insertion. During this quantitative study, 201 adults were randomly assigned to have their SPC placed either by the VAT or by bedside nurses. Results showed significantly lower pain scores with the VAT SPC placement (P = .026), and patients were significantly more likely to report the experience as better than their previous SPC placement experiences (χ2 = 7.8; P = .005). Therefore, the use of a VAT would be worthwh...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - January 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Peripheral Venipuncture Education Strategies for Nursing Students: An Integrative Literature Review
This integrative literature review identified strategies to teach peripheral venipuncture to nursing students. The following databases were searched for primary studies: Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS), PubMed, Web of Science, Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), SCOPUS, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). The final sample was composed of 24 studies. The literature ranged from descriptive studies to controlled clinical trials and methodologic studies to construct products/instruments for teaching peripheral venipuncture. The most frequently identified teaching strategie...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - January 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

A Novel Use of Long-Term Subcutaneous Hydration Therapy for a Pediatric Patient With Intestinal Failure and Chronic Dehydration: A Case Report
Long-term subcutaneous hydration has not been described in pediatrics. A case of a 4-year-old born prematurely with subsequent intestinal failure, large vessel thrombi, and repeated central line-associated bloodstream infections prompting catheter removal is discussed. Chronic dehydration ensued and was managed with long-term subcutaneous fluid infusions with no serious complications. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - January 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Hazardous Drug Residues in the Home Setting: Worker Safety Concerns
Safety concerns have existed for more than 40 years about how hazardous drug (HD) exposure contributes to adverse health outcomes in health care workers. Careless handling causes toxic HD residues to infiltrate hospital and ambulatory care settings and can even be tracked to patient homes. Little is known about the adverse health outcomes experienced by exposed caregivers. The December 1, 2019, release of new regulations will enforce health care organizations to minimize risk to all health care workers by implementing the US Pharmacopeia (USP) General ChapterHazardous Drugs—Handling in Healthcare Settings safety stan...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - January 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

USP General Chapter and Its Impact on Nursing Practice
EDITOR'S NOTE The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) and the Journal of Infusion Nursing (JIN) editors are pleased to debut Pharmacology Report, a recurring bimonthly column authored by Susan Kleppin, RPh, FASHP. Susan is an accomplished pharmacist in health-system pharmacy with significant experience in infusion therapy. Her column will discuss relevant pharmacology topics, including medications new to market, safe handling for hazardous drugs, and managing drug shortages. INS and JIN extend Susan a warm welcome. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - January 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Pharmacology Report Source Type: research

Committed to Care
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - January 1, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Editorial Source Type: research

Effects of Blood Transfusion Sets on Red Blood Cell Hemolysis
This experimental randomized study compared the effects of macrodrop and microdrop blood transfusion sets on red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. Twenty units of packed RBCs from different donors were infused through 48 infusion sets from 2 manufacturers at infusion rates of 10 and 100 mL/h. Pre- and postinfusion analysis was performed to determine total hemoglobin (g/dL), hematocrit (%), free hemoglobin (g/dL), potassium (mmol/L), haptoglobin (g/L), and degree of hemolysis (%). The results demonstrated that the level of free hemoglobin (P (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - November 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

A Study of Tolerability, Satisfaction, and Cost Reduction Using a 10% Immunoglobulin Product at Higher Administration Rates
Gammaplex 10% (immune globulin intravenous [human], Bio Products Laboratory, Ltd) can be administered with a 15-minute rate-escalation protocol. This analysis examined safety, patient satisfaction, and cost savings in 49 patients administered Gammaplex 10% via rapid infusion over 11 months. Fourteen patients reported 38 adverse reactions, 37 of which were deemed minor/moderate. Patient satisfaction was very good/outstanding. Infusions were estimated to be 2.4 hours shorter than previously administered intravenous immunoglobulin infusions, saving $151.61 per visit in nursing costs. Rapid infusion of Gammaplex 10% was found ...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - November 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Developing a Model of Care for Home Infusions of Natalizumab for People With Multiple Sclerosis
In this study, a model of care (MOC), an overarching design for the provision of a health care service, was developed to permit home infusions of natalizumab. The proposed new MOC comprised 9 dimensions, in addition to the central concept of patient-centered care at home. The new MOC is responsive to patient needs and prioritizes the nurse–patient therapeutic relationship. It provides practical examples of patient-centered care to guide clinical practice for this patient population in the home setting. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - November 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

A Comparison of 2 Venous Puncture Sites for Peripheral Implanted Ports
The use of peripheral implanted ports to administer parenteral nutrition in a number of patient cohorts is increasingly seen as a safe alternative to chest ports with equivalence in long-term outcomes. Two insertion sites on the upper arm were compared using the zone insertion method (ZIM), which was developed as an approach to optimize and reduce catheter-related exit site complications. The ZIM divides the medial upper arm into 3 main colors, red, green, and yellow, which are based on musculoskeletal, skin, and vessel characteristics. The optimal exit site is considered to be the green zone, the middle third of the upper...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - November 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Evaluation of the Use of Open Versus Closed Short Peripheral Catheters on Catheter Dwell Time
Short peripheral catheters (SPCs) vary by design and materials. The investigators conducted a before-and-after study comparing catheter dwell time and complications with open and closed system SPCs. Many SPCs in the study were saline locks. Results showed that the closed system SPCs had a significantly longer dwell time than open system SPCs. Complications overall were few and not different between groups. Nurse survey ratings were more positive for reduced blood spillage and materials with the closed system SPC but favored the open system SPC for ease of use when handling the catheter and venipuncture. The most common rea...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - November 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Look How Far We've Come!
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - November 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Editorial Source Type: research

Continuing Education for Nursing Contact Hours and CRNI® Recertification Units
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - August 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Continuing Education Source Type: research

Safety Profile of HTX-019 Administered as an Intravenous Infusion in Patients With Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis
HTX-019 is a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist approved for prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with cancer receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. When administered as a 30-minute intravenous (IV) infusion, HTX-019 has displayed a tolerable and favorable safety profile in healthy subjects. This is the first study to evaluate the safety profile of multiple HTX-019 infusions in patients with cancer. This retrospective analysis shows that HTX-019 administered via IV infusion has a favorable safety profile in patients with cancer, and no new treatment-emergent a...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - August 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Angioedema Risk Associated With Central Vascular Access Device Declotting
Little is known about the risk of angioedema with low-dose alteplase administration in the treatment of thrombotically occluded central vascular access devices (CVADs). To identify potential cases, the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database was searched. Between March 15, 2001, and August 15, 2018, there were 568 low-dose alteplase reports. Of these, 11 appear to be related to complications associated with a device or device occlusion that resulted in an angioedema-like reaction. This suggests that angioedema is a potential complication of alteplase when used for declotting CVADs—a co...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - August 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Achieving a Zero Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rate in 4 Critical Care Units in Lebanon
Every health care facility aims to achieve and maintain a zero central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rate. Infections can be costly for institutions of any size and are often not covered by health insurance. The interventions put in place in this quality improvement project were implemented in 4 phases: (1) develop a new standard of care for central lines and give nurses full responsibility for the care and handling of these lines (including blood sampling); (2) revise policy and provide educational sessions to support nurses; (3) document compliance with the new policy; and (4) document CLABSI rates. The ...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - August 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

A Comparative Study of Blood Sampling From Venipuncture and Short Peripheral Catheters in Pediatric Inpatients
This prospective, comparative study examined blood test results, hemolysis rates, and patient perceptions related to 2 blood sampling methods in pediatric inpatients (N = 95). Blood specimens were drawn via venipuncture and a short peripheral catheter used for fluid administration. Results revealed no significant differences in potassium and glucose levels. No clinically significant difference in hemoglobin was noted. Hemolysis rates were 4% for venipuncture samples and 15% when drawn from peripheral catheters. One catheter became occluded after a blood draw. Patients/parents rated distress and dissatisfaction with venipun...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - August 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Best Practices to Decrease Infusion-Associated Medication Errors: Erratum
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - August 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Erratum Source Type: research

Nurses' Short Peripheral Catheter Flushing Practices: Implications for Patient Care, Nursing Education, and Policy
Nursing practice and institutional policies regarding short peripheral catheter (SPC) flushing vary. These variations result in a lack of understanding about the factors that influence nurses' SPC flushing practices and leave their effect on outcomes unexplored–information that could potentially enhance nurses' clinical education, institutional policy efforts, and patient care. Using a mixed-methods design, this study examined SPC flushing practices and outcomes among a cohort of medical-surgical nurses and explored their rationale for flushing. Trends were noted in the timing of flushes, and the factors that influen...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - August 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Back to School, Back to the Learning Center
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - August 30, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Editorial Source Type: research

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Low-Cost, Domestic Short Peripheral Catheters Versus Higher-Priced, Imported Short Peripheral Catheters
This prospective study has been designed with the hypothesis that low unit price does not necessarily mean cost-effectiveness. Low-cost, domestic short peripheral catheters (SPCs) and higher-priced, imported SPCs were compared in 2 different time periods. With the use of the higher-priced, imported SPCs, the rate of successful insertion on first attempt was increased (P (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

A Cluster of Failures of Midline Catheters in a Hospital in the Home Program: A Retrospective Analysis
A cluster of 11 midline catheter failures occurred during a 2-week period in a Hospital in the Home program in an urban tertiary hospital in Australia. These failures prompted a 4-month retrospective audit of patients receiving outpatient antimicrobial therapy between December 1, 2016 and March 1, 2017. Primary outcomes were dwell time and catheter failure. Peripherally inserted central catheters had significantly fewer failures and significantly longer dwell times compared with midline catheters. Women experienced higher rates of midline catheter failure than men. The proportion of patients with midline catheters receivin...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Parenteral Nutrition Administration by Critical Care Nurses in Iran: A Performance Evaluation
This study evaluates the performance of critical care nurses in Iran in the administration of PN. The performance of 50 nurses in the administration of PN in the ICU was observed 3 times during a 5-month period for a total of 150 observations. A researcher-developed checklist, “Critical Care Nurses' Performance in Parenteral Nutrition Administration,” was used for data collection. The total score in this checklist ranged from 0 to 52. Based on the procedural steps in the checklist and whether the steps were performed appropriately, nurses' performance was scored as poor, moderate, or good. The mean score of nur...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Implementation of a Vascular Access Team to Reduce Central Line Usage and Prevent Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections
This article presents how 1 hospital developed a VAT and implemented evidence-based guidelines. Central line utilization decreased by 45.2%, and CLABSI incidence decreased by 90%. The results of the study demonstrated that a reduced utilization of central lines minimized the risk of patients developing a CLABSI. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Best Practices to Decrease Infusion-Associated Medication Errors
Infusion-associated medication errors have the potential to cause the greatest patient harm. A 21-year review of errors and near-miss reports from a national medication error-reporting program found that infusion-associated medication errors resulted in the identification of numerous best practices that support patient safety. A content analysis revealed that most errors involved improper dosage, mistaken drug choice, knowledge-based mistakes, skill-based slips, and memory lapses. The multifaceted nature of administering medications via infusions was highlighted. Opportunities for improvements include best practices such a...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Presidential Address
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Presidential Address Source Type: research

2018 INS Financial Report
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: 2018 INS Financial Report Source Type: research

State of the Society
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: State of the Society Source Type: research

Put Your Passion Into Print
No abstract available (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Departments: Editorial Source Type: research

Accepted but Unacceptable: Peripheral IV Catheter Failure
Peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter insertion, the most common invasive hospital procedure performed worldwide, is associated with a variety of complications and an unacceptably high overall failure rate of 35% to 50% in even the best of hands. Catheter failure is costly to patients, caregivers, and the health care system. Although advances have been made, analysis of the mechanisms underlying the persistent high rate of peripheral IV failure reveals opportunities for improvement. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features: Reprint Source Type: research

Accepted but Unacceptable: Peripheral IV Catheter Failure: 2019 Follow-up
EDITOR'S NOTE Still considered a “hot topic” 4 years later, JIN is pleased to reprint this classic article from May/June 2015, Issue 3. Since publication, “Accepted but Unacceptable: Peripheral IV Catheter Failure” has been downloaded nearly 400 times and cited dozens of times in other related research. Based on these data, we asked the lead author to update readers on the status of catheter failure and what has been improved since 2015. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features: Classic Article Update Source Type: research

To Replace or Not to Replace? Replacing Short Peripheral Catheters Based on Clinical Indication
Short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are the most frequently used medical devices in hospital settings. Many hospital policies state that SPCs be replaced at 96 hours, which can be unnecessary and costly. A pre–post quality improvement initiative was implemented following complications surrounding removal of timed SPC catheters compared with those removed by clinical indication, using the Visual Infusion Phlebitis (VIP) scale. Data collected included patient demographics, SPC characteristics, nursing time, and product use. SPCs replaced based on clinical indication remained intact longer and had fewer complications than...
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research

Trifecta of Collaboration: Working Together to Improve Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Reduction in a Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit
This article illustrates how a multidisciplinary collaboration and the use of scientific evaluation and implementation tools can facilitate a decrease in CLABSIs and have a positive effect on staff satisfaction when caring for central lines. (Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing)
Source: Journal of Infusion Nursing - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research