Are clinically recommended pelvic floor muscle relaxation positions really efficient for muscle relaxation?
ConclusionsEfficient PFM relaxation is maintained during positions recommended in physiotherapy clinics. The extent of PFM and abdominal muscle relaxation varies according to the positions. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 24, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Rectocele: victim of availability bias? Results of a Belgian survey of colorectal and gynecological surgeons
ConclusionsAn availability bias is seen in different aspects of rectocele evaluation and treatment. Colorectal surgeons and gynecologists are acting based on their training and experience. Motivation for pelvic floor MDT starts with creating awareness of the availability bias. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 24, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Non-medication coping strategies for urinary incontinence in older adults: factors associated with frequency of use
ConclusionsThis study recommends carrying out studies to raise awareness about urinary incontinence in older adults. In addition, this study suggests that the questionnaire applied to older adults study subjects regarding the frequency of the use of non-medication coping strategies for urinary incontinence might be used for all age groups. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 23, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

The efficacy and safety of a single maintenance laser treatment for stress urinary incontinence: a double-blinded randomized controlled trial
ConclusionsOur results suggest that a single maintenance laser treatment for reducing symptoms of SUI is transiently effective, well tolerated and safe. This treatment modality provides alternative non-surgical therapy for women with SUI. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 23, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Treatment with platelet-rich plasma attenuates proprioceptor abnormalities in a rat model of postpartum stress urinary incontinence
ConclusionsPSUI rats have an abnormal expression of pelvic proprioceptors, which affect proprioceptive function, and further the contractibility of pelvic floor muscles. A PRP injection may restore the sensory function of pelvic proprioceptors, thus improving urine leakage in PSUI rats. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 23, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Development and validation of a predictive model for urinary incontinence postpartum: a prospective longitudinal study
ConclusionsThe nomogram proved to be a convenient and reliable tool in the clinical setting for risk assessment of postpartum incontinence, which can be applied during pregnancy and the postnatal period for individual risk estimates of postpartum incontinence. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 19, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Evaluation of YouTube videos on primary bladder pain syndrome
ConclusionsAlthough about half of the videos are reliable, most are long and are medical lectures, from which it is difficult for nonhealth professionals and patients to obtain information. On the other hand, most of the videos that patients can follow more easily consist of nonreliable video groups that lack accuracy, detail, and factual content. Therefore, the relevant associations with experts should prepare concise videos containing correct and up-to-date information. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 18, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Mesh Exposure Following Vaginal Versus Laparoscopic Hysterectomy at the Time of Sacrocolpopexy
ConclusionsAt 1 year, there is no significant difference in vaginal mesh exposure rates between vaginal hysterectomy with vaginal mesh attachment and laparoscopic hysterectomy with abdominal mesh attachment. Both groups have equal efficacy with low rates of complications. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 14, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Under-classified obstetric anal sphincter injuries
ConclusionSome women with OASIs that have under-classified OASIs are associated with worse anorectal symptoms. This is likely because of an incomplete repair. Some improvement in diagnosis of IAS tears has been noted. We propose improved training in OASIs can help reduce the number of incorrectly classified tears and improve repair. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 12, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Quality appraisal of clinical guidelines for recurrent urinary tract infections using AGREE II: a systematic review
ConclusionsSignificant room for improvement exists in the quality of CPGs for recurrent UTI, with most displaying serious limitations in the stakeholder involvement, rigour of development, and applicability domains. These aspects must be improved to decrease diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainty. Developers could benefit from using checklists and following guidelines when developing de novo CPGs. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 10, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Postpartum urinary retention: what are the sequelae? A long-term study and review of the literature
ConclusionsIn most cases PUR resolves early, but voiding difficulties persist more often than previously thought, and for these patients the consequences are devastating. Obstetric awareness, early active management, and developing management strategies in the postpartum period might preclude lower urinary tract morbidity. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 7, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Associations between metabolic syndrome and female stress urinary incontinence: a meta-analysis
ConclusionsMetabolic syndrome is associated with SUI in women and increases its risk. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 5, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

The effectiveness of different electrical nerve stimulation protocols for treating adults with non-neurogenic overactive bladder: a systematic review and meta-analysis
ConclusionsThere was evidence that tibial neurostimulation is more effective than sacral neurostimulation for urge incontinence symptoms among patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder. Overall, there was no superiority of an electrical nerve stimulation electrode placement and protocol over others considering urinary symptoms and quality of life. Further studies with three-arm trials are necessary. This study was registered at PROSPERO: CRD4201810071. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 4, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Lies, damned lies, and pelvic floor illustration: Confused about pelvic floor anatomy? You are not alone
AbstractDissection reveals elegant simplicity in pelvic floor structure. So, why are so many of us confused about the pelvic floor? The pelvic floor is in an invisible region between what we see from above and below, so our experience does not help. It is confusing because there is conflict between existing illustrations, so we do not know which are false and which are true. To resolve conflicts in pelvic anatomy we must: recognize the Vesalian principle that truth lies in the body, not necessarily in books; commit to focusing on structures rather than words; and overcome “theory-induced blindness,” the psychological p...
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - February 3, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research