Feasibility of combining pelvic reconstruction with gynecologic oncology-related surgery
ConclusionsIn our single-institution experience, concurrent gynecologic oncology and pelvic floor reconstructive surgery were safe and feasible in combination with no reported major morbidity events. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - May 2, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

The effects of sexual counseling and pelvic floor relaxation on sexual functions in women receiving vaginismus treatment: a randomized controlled study
ConclusionsThe sexual counseling based on the IMB model and pelvic relaxation interventions provided to the women who were receiving vaginismus treatment affected their sexual function positively. It may be recommended to conduct comparative studies with a broader sample and different models. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - May 2, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Comparing the efficacy of the Knack maneuver on pelvic floor muscle function and urinary symptoms using different teaching methods: a prospective, nonrandomized study
ConclusionsRegardless of the teaching methods, the Knack maneuver and education programs were effective on urinary symptoms in women with mild to moderate SUI. The Knack maneuver training with vaginal palpation and verbal instruction improved MVC of PFMs. All three different teaching methods might be used in SUI treatment programs. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - May 2, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Joint terminology documents: towards a transdisciplinary pelvic floor terminology alliance
(Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - May 2, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Laparoscopic sacrohysteropexy versus vaginal sacrospinous hysteropexy as treatment for uterine descent: comparison of long-term outcomes
ConclusionsLSH and SSHP seem to be equally effective after long-term follow-up in treating uterine prolapse in terms of objective and subjective recurrence. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 28, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Birthweight difference between deliveries and the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injury in parous women
ConclusionsIn parous women, neonatal BW increase between deliveries of> 500 g is associated with OASI. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 26, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Comparison of Sheares vaginoplasty, vaginoplasty using acellular porcine small intestinal submucosa graft and laparoscopic peritoneal vaginoplasty in patients with Mayer-Rokitansky-K üster-Hauser syndrome
ConclusionSheares vaginoplasty and the vaginoplasty using SIS graft caused less trauma and provided similar functional results to laparoscopic peritoneal vaginoplasty. However, the patients in the Sheares group and SIS graft group needed to wear the mould for a longer duration post-surgery. Sheares vaginoplasty can provide a valuable and economic alternative method for the creation of a neovagina in patients with MRKHS. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 25, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

When does oasis cause de novo pelvic floor dysfunction? role of the surgeon's skills
ConclusionsSurgeons skilled in OASIS repair resulted the only protective factor for incidence ofde novo PFDs in women with OASIS at 6 weeks of follow up. Improvement of training in OASIS repair is necessary. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 25, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Validation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the questionnaire for the assessment of pelvic floor disorders and their risk factors during pregnancy and postpartum
ConclusionsThese results provide evidence that the questionnaire for the assessment of pelvic floor disorders and their risk factors during pregnancy and postpartum is a valid and reliable instrument when utilized in Brazilian pregnant and postpartum women. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 25, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Episiotomy in vacuum extraction, do we cut the levator ani muscle? A prospective cohort study
ConclusionsThere was no excessive risk of cutting the LAM while performing a lateral episiotomy. LAD was not seen in women with episiotomies shorter than 18 mm. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 25, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Urodynamic profile of voiding in patients with pelvic organ prolapse after surgery: a systematic review with meta-analysis
ConclusionCorrection surgery for POP yields better urodynamic emptying parameters, with a reduction in the prevalence of DO. In contrast, sling placement enhances obstructive parameters. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 23, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Stress urinary incontinence and the forgotten female hormones
AbstractThe use of hormones to treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI) has fallen out of favor because of concerns over safety following publication of the Women ’s Health Initiative study. In addition, there are data that suggest that estrogen treatment does not help SUI. As women age, the decline in androgen output mirrors the increasing prevalence of SUI implying a potential causal association. Therefore, we suggest that androgens are the ‘forgotten f emale hormone.’ Vaginal estrogens can treat pelvic floor structures without significant systemic effects; we suggest that vaginal androgens can act similarly and the...
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 23, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells therapy on bilateral pelvic nerve crush-induced voiding dysfunction in rats
ConclusionsBMSC therapy suppressed detrusor fibrosis, improved intravesical pressure and voiding efficiency, and partially restored voiding function in male rats after BPNC. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 22, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

The efficacy of force of stream assessment for post-operative catheter management: a retrospective cohort study
ConclusionThe subjective assessment of flow of stream is a reliable and safe method to assess postoperative voiding. Given it is less invasive than backfilling the bladder and easier than using a bladder scan, it should be the primary method to assess postoperative voiding. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 22, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Comparison of early loosening vs delayed section of mid-urethral slings for postoperative voiding dysfunction
ConclusionsEarly loosening of MUS in the case of postoperative voiding dysfunction offers better efficacy than DS of the sling, with a lower risk of recurrent/persistent SUI. (Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction)
Source: International Urogynecology Journal and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction - April 21, 2022 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research