Puberty in the Bronze Age: first application of a puberty estimation method to a prehistoric population
AbstractPuberty and adolescence represent a significant period of physical growth and maturation and a critical life stage in which children transition into adults within their societies. Numerous studies have observed a secular trend and have determined that puberty is now occurring earlier than in the past. This investigation represents the first application of a methodology for assessing the pubertal status of osteological remains to a prehistoric skeletal sample. Six Bronze Age adolescent skeletons from theCerro de La Encantada archaeological site (Ciudad Real, Spain) were analyzed. Pre ‐pubescence was observed at ag...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - October 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Danielle M. Doe, Mar ía Molina Moreno, Josefina Rascón Pérez, Nieves Candelas González, Oscar Cambra‐Moo, Manuel Campo Martín, Armando González Martín Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

A case of ankylosing spondylitis from the excavations at kili Çli necropolis (sinope, northern turkey) and its implications on the antiquity of the disease in anatolia
In this study, we aimed to identify an AS case which has AS ‐originated pathological changes on a relatively well‐preserved middle‐aged male skeleton, recovered from the archaeological excavation of Kılıçlı Church, Sinope, Northern Turkey and dated to the 18‐19th centuries. In addition, we made a differential diagnosis with other pathologies such as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), reactive arthritis (ReA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). In the specimen there are four macroscopic features which are diagnostic of AS: (1) both sacroiliac joints were symmetrically obliterated, (2) spinal fusi...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - October 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: İzzet Duyar Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

A case of projectile trauma from the medieval Poulton Chapel, Cheshire, UK
AbstractExcavations at the medieval cemetery of Poulton Chapel, Cheshire have uncovered over 900 articulated human skeletal remains, with numbers predicted to reach as high as 1500 as excavations continue. The demographics of this archaeological site is typical of a medieval rural assemblage. However, SK535 provides a glimpse into some of the traumatic aspects of medieval life. The excavation of SK535 revealed a middle ‐aged adult male around 168cm in stature. His position of burial was typical of Christian burials with an east‐west orientation but, the positioning of his arms identified that this was not a typical bur...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - October 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sara M. Canavan, Carla L. Burrell, Michael M. Emery, Silvia Gonzalez Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

The youngest meningioma? A historic Maya adolescent from Tipu, Belize
We present a hyperostotic cranial lesion in an adolescent from the early historic population of Tipu in west central Belize. It fits most clinical and epidemiological patterns of meningeal expression in modern children, and differential diagnosis finds other possible conditions, including dietary deficiencies and genetic anaemias, unlikely. The often subtle characteristics of meningiomas, which can be both osteolytic and osteoblastic, need to be described in detail to diffe rentiate them from other conditions, especially porotic hyperostosis. The Tipu case is the only nonadult example to correspond with published clinical ...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - September 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marie Elaine Danforth, Kelly Kramer, Della Collins Cook, Mark N. Cohen Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Sacral preauricular extensions, notches, and corresponding iliac changes: New terms and the proposal of a recording system
We present a nomenclature, a detailed descriptio n of the morphological modifications, and propose a recording system. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - September 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Doris Pany ‐Kucera, Michaela Spannagl‐Steiner, Stanislaus Argeny, Barbara Maurer‐Gesek, Wolfgang J. Weninger, Katharina Rebay‐Salisbury Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Exploring life patterns using entheseal changes in equids: Application of a new method on unworked specimens
This study shows ECs to be age ‐related and influenced by sexual dimorphism. Both aetiologies must be considered in future analyses. Some attachments in these specimens appear not to be influenced by sex and/or age at death, and this is promising. It is clear, however, that further studies of equids with documented activities a re necessary to achieve a better appreciation of the factors responsible for the appearance of ECs before being applied to archaeological remains. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - September 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marion Bind é, David Cochard, Christopher J. Knüsel Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Species identification of Late Pleistocene bat bones using collagen fingerprinting
AbstractBats form the second most diverse mammalian order (Chiroptera) and vary widely in their physiology and ecology. Those species which live in temperate climates are generally insectivorous and nocturnal or crepuscular, sheltering in tree hollows, caves or buildings during the day. They are potentially valuable ecological indicators, due to their dependence on suitable roosting sites and arthropod food, both of which are commonly affected by human activities. Identification of bats from ancient assemblages that are found in caves could therefore provide useful data for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions and show the ...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Michael Buckley, Jeremy Herman Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

The Youngest Meningioma? An Historic Maya Adolescent from Tipu, Belize
We present a hyperostotic cranial lesion in an adolescent from the early Historic population of Tipu in west central Belize. It fits most clinical and epidemiological patterns of meningeal expression in modern children, and differential diagnosis finds other possible conditions, including dietary deficiencies and genetic anemias, unlikely. The often subtle characteristics of meningiomas, which can be both osteolytic and osteoblastic, need to be described in detail to differentiate them from other conditions, especially porotic hyperostosis. The Tipu case is the only non‐adult exam ple to correspond with published clinica...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marie Elaine Danforth, Kelly Kramer, Della Collins Cook, Mark N. Cohen Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Using quadratic discriminant analysis for osteometric pair ‐matching of long bone antimeres: An evaluation on modern and archaeological samples
We present here an approach based on quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA). This approach is evaluated on antimeric pairs of humeri and femora from the openly available Goldman Data Set, and compared to two classical and previously published methods for osteometric pair ‐matching, based respectively on linear regressions and t‐tests. It is shown that QDA globally outperforms existing solutions for reassociating those long bones, in particular by rejecting fewer true bone pairs at the classical α level of 0.10. The accuracy of all three methods is analyzed thro ugh receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Fr édéric Santos, Sébastien Villotte Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Babes, bones, and isotopes: A stable isotope investigation on nonadults from Aventicum, Roman Switzerland (first –third century CE)
This study presents the stable isotopic results of the first Roman bone sample analysed from Switzerland (30 nonadults and nine females), allowing us an unprecedented insight into health and diet at the site of Aventicum/Avenches, the capital city of the territory ofHelvetii in Roman times (first –third century AD). The fact that the majority of the nonadult samples subject to stable isotope analysis were perinates highlights the complex relationship between their δ15N and δ13C values and those of adult females, as different factors, including variation of fetal and maternal stable isotope values, the pos...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Chryssi Bourbou, Gabriele Arenz, V éronique Dasen, Sandra Lösch Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Issue Information ‐ TOC
No abstract is available for this article. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: ISSUE INFORMATION ‐ TOC Source Type: research

Sacral preauricular extensions, notches and corresponding iliac changes: new terms and the proposal of a recording system
We present a nomenclature, a detailed description of the morphological modifications and propose a recording system. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Doris Pany ‐Kucera, Michaela Spannagl‐Steiner, Stanislaus Argeny, Barbara Maurer‐Gesek, Wolfgang J. Weninger, Katharina Rebay‐Salisbury Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

An Iron Age Skull with a Bone Neoplasm from Nilka County, Xinjiang, China
In this study, we report a case of bone neoplasm arising in the temporal bone from a young male individual excavated from an Iron Age Qiongkeke Cemetery located in Nilka County, Yili, Xinjiang, China. The lesion presented as a cluster of ossified spicules in the infratemporal fossa. The possible diagnosis is a low ‐grade malignant neoplasm, probably parosteal osteosarcoma, while some other kinds of neoplasms are possible though less likely. There were no signs of cortical bone destruction or periosteal reaction, indicating the differential diagnosis with conventional osteosarcoma and other exophytic cranial bone neoplasm...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Quanchao Zhang, Qun Zhang, Tao Han, Hong Zhu, Qian Wang Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Paget's disease of bone in two medieval skeletons from Poulton Chapel, Cheshire, UK
This study reviews an adult male (SK463) and female (SK750) with skeletal lesions of PDB from Poulton Chapel, Cheshire. Full macroscopic and radiographic analysis has identified the skeletal distribution of PDB, with up to 75% of both skeletons affected. SK463 presents noticeable anterior bowing to both tibiae, likely the result of PDB. AMS radiocarbon dating and stable isotope analysis performed on teeth samples confirmed that both individuals' dates were medieval, had a mixed/varied diet and were local to the northwest of England. This research adds to the emerging paleopathological literature on PDB, while providing add...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Carla L. Burrell, Michael M. Emery, Silvia Gonzalez Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Archaeological hunting patterns of Amazonian horticulturists: the Guarani example
AbstractWe analyze the hunting patterns based on faunal records of horticultural groups from the Atlantic Forest grouped in the Guarani archaeological unit, which are the material and behavioral expression of populations of Amazon origin who practiced slash ‐and‐burn agriculture in the Atlantic Forest of Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay and Paraguay. The analyzed temporal block ranges fromca. 1373 – 1698 of the Common Era. The characteristics of the faunal assemblages are the high level of the taxa richness and the equitability, where no taxa predominate over the others. The capture decision was probably guided primari...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: A. Acosta, M. Carbonera, D. Loponte Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Food management of early introduced caprine and bovine herds in the early Neolithic site of La Draga (Banyoles): an isotopic approach
AbstractThe arrival of early farmers and their livestock in the Western Mediterranean during the Early Neolithic marked a new way of life for the northeast Iberian Peninsula. Given the permanence of the introduced economic strategies, which are still practiced today, and their apparently momentous outcome, this process has generally been explained as a success. The introduction of livestock must have played a fundamental role but we know little about how these newly ‐arrived domestic animals were managed. In this sense, the management of food habits of domestic animals could be a key factor to understand the success of d...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Vanessa Navarrete, Carlos Tornero, Marie Balasse, Maria Sa ña Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Comparative osteology and osteometry of the coracoideum, humerus, and femur of the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) and the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta)
AbstractFragmented skeletal remains of marine turtles occur frequently in archaeological and natural deposits on tropical and subtropical coasts. Identifying these remains to species based on their differential osteomorphology is vital to address questions pertaining to the historical ecology, archaeology, and conservation of marine turtles globally. Although the species ‐specific features of extant marine turtle skulls and carapax are relatively well known, the comparative osteomorphology and osteometry of postcranial endoskeletons in closely related species of marine turtles remains unstudied. In this paper, we provide...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Franciscus Johannes Koolstra, Hans Christian K üchelmann, Canan Ҫakirlar Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Babes, bones, and isotopes: a stable isotope investigation on non ‐adults from Aventicum, Roman Switzerland (1st‐3rd c. CE)
This study presents the stable isotopic results of the first Roman bone sample analyzed from Switzerland (30 non ‐adults and 9 females), allowing us an unprecedented insight into health and diet at the site of Aventicum/Avenches, the capital city of the territory ofHelvetii in Roman times (1st‐3rd c. AD). The fact that the majority of the non ‐adult samples subject to stable isotope analysis were perinates, highlights the complex relationship between their δ15N and δ13C values and those of adult females, as different factors, including variation of fetal and maternal stable isotope values, the possible ef...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Chryssi Bourbou, Gabriele Arenz, V éronique Dasen, Sandra Lösch Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Exploring life ‐patterns using entheseal changes in equids: application of a new method on unworked specimens.
This study shows EC to be age‐related and influenced by sexual dimorphism. Both etiologies must be considered in future analyses. Some attachments in these specimens appear not to be influenced by sex and/or age‐at‐death, and this is promising. It i s clear, however, that further studies of equids with documented activities are necessary to achieve a better appreciation of the factors responsible for the appearance of EC before being applied to archaeological remains. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marion Bind é, David Cochard, Christopher J. Knüsel Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Estimating sex using isolated appendicular skeletal elements from Chachapoyas, Peru
AbstractThe estimation of sex from human skeletal remains is one of the primary steps in the creation of a bioarchaeological demography. Conventionally, sex has been estimated from crania or os coxae, but commingled contexts pose challenges when associating these key elements with the rest of the remains becomes impossible or if the sample is mostly represented by postcranial appendicular elements. Following successful applications of logistic regression to appendicular metrics in forensic anthropology for the estimation of sex using appropriate reference samples, this study aims to create a similar method to be applied in...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Armando Anzellini, J. Marla Toyne Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Identification of guinea pig remains in the Pucar á de Tilcara (Jujuy, Argentina): Evidence in favor of the presence of the Andean breed in the Quebrada de Humahuaca
AbstractIn this article, we identified rodent remains found in the Pucar á de Tilcara, an archaeological site from the Argentine Northwest that was occupied by humans from 1,100 AD until the Spanish conquest. The zooarchaeological analyses were carried out using anatomical descriptions and geometric morphometric analyses of the dorsal and ventral views of mandibular rem ains. The results and the archaeological context discussed showed that all the rodent remains could correspond to the Andean breed of domestic guinea pigs. The combination of the methods used here gave us a strong support to the taxonomical assignmen...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lautaro N. Lopez Geronazzo, Clarisa Otero, Alicia Álvarez, Marcos D. Ercoli, Natalia Cortés‐Delgado Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Paget's disease of bone in two medieval skeletons from Poulton Chapel, Cheshire, UK.
This study reviews an adult male (SK463) and female (SK750) with skeletal lesions of PDB from Poulton Chapel, Cheshire. Full macroscopic and radiographic analysis has identified the skeletal distribution of PDB, with up to 75% of both skeletons affected. SK463 presents noticeable anterior bowing to both tibiae, likely the result of PDB. AMS radiocarbon dating and stable isotope analysis performed on teeth samples confirmed that both individuals dates were medieval, had a mixed/varied diet and were local to the northwest of England. This research adds to the emerging paleopathological literature on PDB, while providing addi...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - August 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Carla L. Burrell, Michael M. Emery, Silvia Gonzalez Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Infants from the Tarapac á 40 cemetery (Northern Chile, Formative Period, 1000 BC–AD 600)
This study explores the age at death structure, skeletal lesions, and artificial cranial modification (ACM) on 35 nonadults until their 38 months of life recovered from the Tarapac á 40 cemetery, Northern Chile. Age estimations were based primarily on long bones dimensions, whereas skeletal lesions and ACM were recognized on dry bones and in mummified and bundled bodies. Measurements and observations in these later were performed by radiographies. Results show a distribution of ages at death clustered in three groups: around birth and second month of life, between 9 and 12 months of life, and between 18 and 26 month...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Andrea Gonz ález‐Ramírez, Aryel Pacheco Miranda, Arturo Sáez, Iván Arregui Wunderlich Tags: SHORT REPORT Source Type: research

Periapical lesions in hominids: Abscesses on the maxilla of a 2 million ‐year‐old early Homo specimen
In this study, maxilla and mandible fragments from the South African fossil hominin collections were studied, including specimens assigned toHomo naledi,Paranthropus robustus,Australopithecus africanus, and earlyHomo.Gorilla gorilla gorilla,Pan troglodytes, andHomo sapiens were also studied for comparative purposes. Only one fossil hominin specimen displayed voids consistent with periapical lesions. The specimen, SK 847, is described as earlyHomo and has been dated to 2.3 –1.65 Ma. There is one definite periapical lesion and likely more with post‐mortem damage, all on the anterior aspect of the maxilla and associat...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Towle, Joel D. Irish Tags: SHORT REPORT Source Type: research

Who lived on the Swiss Plateau around 3300 BCE? Analyses of commingled human skeletal remains from the dolmen of Oberbipp
AbstractNowadays, the discovery and excavation of an almost intact Late Neolithic dolmen is rare, as those monuments were often visible in the landscape and have been investigated or destroyed in earlier times; therefore, information about the buried individuals has often been lost. The excavation of the dolmen, a stone grave chamber, from Oberbipp, Switzerland, in 2012 provided a unique opportunity to study human skeletal remains from a Late Neolithic collective burial (3350 –2650 BCE). Over 2,000 fragmented and commingled skeletal elements were recovered and form the basis of this morphological study. Established m...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Inga Siebke, Noah Steuri, Anja Furtw ängler, Marianne Ramstein, Gabriele Arenz, Albert Hafner, Johannes Krause, Sandra Lösch Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Preanalytical processing of archaeological mammal enamel apatite carbonates for stable isotope investigations: A comparative analysis of the effect of acid treatment on samples from Northwest Australia
This study tests three different pretreatment protocols on modern and Pleistocene age archaeological kangaroo teeth (dating from contemporary to 46,000bp) to assess the effect of acid treatment time on isotopic integrity. The results indicate that treatment time is a critical parameter for producing consistency across results and shorter pretreatments of 4  hr or less are preferable for removing diagenetic carbonates while minimising alteration of the biological signal. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jane Skippington, Peter Veth, Tiina Manne, Michael Slack Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

A reevaluation of bird taxonomic identifications at Contact ‐ and historic‐era North American sites
AbstractDomestic chickens (Gallus domesticus) and turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are identified more frequently than other bird species in bone assemblages from historic sites in North America. Recent studies on the effectiveness of metric data for identification of galliform bones found high degrees of similarity in size and morphology between wild game birds (e.g., grouse and ptarmigan) and multiple domestic or introduced species (e.g., chicken and pheasant). This finding suggests that wild taxa and less common domesticates may have been misidentified as chicken and as a result are underrepresented in these historic datas...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jessica E. Watson, Sarah Heins Ledogar Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Evidence ‐based criteria for palaeopathological recognition: New methodology suggests that the rotator cuff condition will be amenable to reliable identification in the archeologic record
ConclusionsThere have been no validated evidence ‐based criteria applicable for recognizing rotator cuff conditions in skeletons, in the absence of soft tissue structures. Greater tuberosity osteopenia has been noted but not yet evaluated for specificity. Rotator cuff conditions may actually be unrelated to lifestyle but may simply represent the accumulation/culmination of lifetime stresses (aging). The ratio of acromial lateral extension and height provides greater opportunity for confident diagnosis.Given the disconnection between presence or extent of pathology and clinical symptoms and limitations/disability, identif...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bruce M. Rothschild Tags: SHORT REPORT Source Type: research

Accurate Sr isotope determination of human bone and tooth samples by LA ‐MC‐ICP‐MS: A comment on “Meijer et al., (2019)”
AbstractThe in ‐situ Sr isotope determination of low‐Sr bioapatites is challenging and requires monitoring several interferences, among others, Ar‐CaPO. In particular, the analysis of human bones and teeth has revealed several pitfalls, which affect the ability to obtain accurate results. In this commentary, I review the data from the paper of Meijer et al. (2019), trying to address some accuracy issues arising, in my opinion, from polyatomic interferences. After a tentative calibration of their data, using the 1/88Sr signal (V−1) as a proxy of the Sr content, the enamel specimens (enamel Ar ‐CaPO corrected87...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Federico Lugli Tags: COMMENTARY Source Type: research

A remarkable case of gout in the Imperial Rome: Surgery and diseases in antiquity by osteoarchaeological, paleopathological, and historical perspectives
This study is the result of a multidisciplinary approach and focuses on a case of considerable historical and medical interest. The work originally stemmed from findings at a funerary site in the area of Casal Bertone in Rome (Italy), regards an individual in a tomb identified simply by the number “75.” The skeletal alterations that were later discovered gave rise a debate among the members of the team. Challenges in identifying the pathology have brought historians, anthropologists, and radiologists into the field with the use of sophisticated equipment, including CT scans and X‐ray eq uipment, as well as so...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gino Fornaciari, Silvia Marinozzi, Daniela Messineo, Carla Caldarini, Federica Zavaroni, Silvia Iorio, Longo Sveva, Silvia Capuani, Paola Catalano, Valentina Gazzaniga Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Issue Information ‐ TOC
No abstract is available for this article. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 19, 2019 Category: Science Tags: ISSUE INFORMATION ‐ TOC Source Type: research

Fish and fishing communities: Understanding ancient and modern fisheries through archaeological fish remains
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, Volume 29, Issue 3, Page 363-364, May/June 2019. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Arlene Fradkin, Harry K. Robson, Kenneth Ritchie, Gabriele Carenti, Barbara Wilkens Tags: EDITORIAL Source Type: research

Microcomputed tomography and genetic analysis of a rare case of Caffey's disease in a 5 –7‐month‐old girl
AbstractAncient human remains provided precious information about the health and disease of individuals from the past. Usually, diagnosis and assessment of the paleopathological remains were performed using RX analysis, tomography, and histology. However, thanks to the progress in ancient DNA recovery and sequencing, genetic information can used to support the diagnoses performed using classical approach. Here, we described the paleopathological remains of a 5 to 7 ‐month infant, excavated from Saint‐Jacques church (Douai, France), dated from 16th to 18th century. The skeleton displayed bone lesions, consisting in a ma...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Daniela Lombardo, Alessandra Modi, Chiara Vergata, David Caramelli, Tristan Pascart, Benoit Bertrand, Annalisa Vetro, Martina Lari, Thomas Colard Tags: SHORT REPORT Source Type: research

The preburning condition of Chalcolithic cremated human remains from the Perdig ões enclosures (Portugal)
In this study, we analyse heat‐induced bone changes and other archaeothanatological variables to tentatively assess the preburning condition of the human remains. The results of Pit 40 are also compared with other comparable contexts to ass ess if this unique context presents further funerary differences relative to those other contexts in, for example, body processing. Our results suggest preferential cremation of fleshed human remains, but burning of at least a minority of skeletonised remains and deposition of possibly unburned rema ins also likely occurred. Body processing appears to be comparable with that of the cr...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ricardo Miguel Godinho, David Gon çalves, António Carlos Valera Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Applying the Index of Care to the Mississippian Period: A case study of treponematosis, physical impairment, and probable health ‐related caregiving from the Holliston Mills Site, TN.
This study highlights how bioarchaeological evidence can be used to explore the downstream effects of chronic infections, such as treponematosis, throughout the body and across the life course, and the opportunities for health‐related caregiving in past societies that these processes can potentially create. (Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology)
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Molly K. Zuckerman, Kelly R. Kamnikar, Anna Osterholtz, Nicholas P. Herrmann, Jay D. Franklin Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Infants from the Tarapac á 40 cemetery (Northern Chile, Formative Period, 1000 BC‐AD 600)
This study explores the age at death structure, skeletal lesions, and artificial cranial modification (ACM) on 35 non ‐adults until their 38 months of life recovered from the Tarapacá‐40 cemetery, Northern Chile. Age estimations were based primarily on long bones dimensions, while skeletal lesions and ACM were recognized on dry bones and in mummified and bundled bodies. Measurements and observations in these l ater were performed by radiographies. Results show a distribution of ages at death clustered in three groups: around birth and second month of life, between 9‐12 months of life, and between 18 and 26 mon...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Andrea Gonz ález‐Ramírez, Aryel Pacheco Miranda, Arturo Sáez Sepúlveda, Iván Arregui Wunderlich Tags: SHORT REPORT Source Type: research

Periapical lesions in hominids: abscesses on the maxilla of a two million ‐year‐old early Homo specimen
In this study, maxilla and mandible fragments from the South African fossil hominin collections were studied, including specimens assigned toHomo naledi,Paranthropus robustus,Australopithecus africanus and earlyHomo.Gorilla gorilla gorilla,Pan troglodytes andHomo sapiens were also studied for comparative purposes. Only one fossil hominin specimen displayed voids consistent with periapical lesions. The specimen, SK 847, is described as earlyHomo and has been dated to 2.3 ‐1.65MA. There is one definite periapical lesion and likely more with postmortem damage, all on the anterior aspect of the maxilla and associated with th...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Towle, Joel D. Irish Tags: SHORT REPORT Source Type: research

Violence in European medieval monasteries: skeletal trauma in Tepl á monastery (Czech Republic)
AbstractMedieval monasteries often went beyond their religious mission and developed into economic, social, and educational centres. These were not spared from violent attack on the part of the gentry. The defence of such monasteries is, however, a poorly investigated area in bioarchaeological studies. A recently excavated skeletal sample found in front of the western gate of the Abbey Church at the Tepl á monastery (Czech Republic) dated between the 13th and 15th century AD provides us a unique opportunity to fill this gap. The analysis of skeletal trauma reveals that 13 out of 30 individuals exhibited trauma, of w...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Anna Pankowsk á, Patrik Galeta, Petra Uhlík Spěváčková, Karel Nováček Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Don't throw the baby teeth out with the bathwater: Estimating subadult age using tooth wear in commingled archaeological assemblages
This study demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the age of developmentally ‐ambiguous deciduous and permanent molars with reference to an adequate sample of subadult dentition with estimated ages from the same population. This new method is valuable as it extracts information from developmentally‐ambiguous teeth that would otherwise be inaccessible, allows for rapid da ta collection, employs standard macroscopic dental scoring methods, and can be used for sites from other regions and periods. We conclude by discussing the applications of this new method within bioarchaeology and identify directions for future r...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - July 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: J. Beck, B.H. Smith Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Differential diagnoses of enamel hypomineralisation in an archaeological context: A postmedieval skeletal collection reassessment
AbstractDevelopmental enamel defects (DDE) are often used as indicators of general health in past archaeological populations. DDE include three common types of lesions: hypoplasia, diffuse, and demarcated opacities. Molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) was defined in 2001 as a qualitative enamel defect affecting first permanent molars and often permanent incisors. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry established criteria to diagnose MIH in current populations as demarcated white or yellow ‐brown opacities of enamel with or without posteruptive breakdown. MIH is prevalent in current populations (average 14.2%) a...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Elsa Garot, Christine Couture ‐Veschambre, David John Manton, Jelena Bekvalac, Patrick Rouas Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Fishing together, fishing on its own: fish exploitation patterns at the Neolithic Alepotrypa cave (Diros, Greece) and Aegean prehistoric fishing traditions in perspective
AbstractVarious marine animal assemblages from prehistoric contexts across the Mediterranean suggest a focus on the exploitation of marine resources by coastal populations as early as the Mesolithic. Along with the harvesting of near shore coastal resources (fish and invertebrates), a more organised fishing activity that targeted pelagic species, traditionally considered migratory, is evident in several Mesolithic assemblages. With the advent of the Neolithic, marine ‐related subsistence activities seem to be gradually restricted to the exploitation of coastal year‐round resources. The cave of Alepotrypa in the Pelopon...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tatiana Theodoropoulou Tags: SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Source Type: research

A re ‐evaluation of bird taxonomic identifications at Contact and historic‐era North American sites
AbstractDomestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are identified more frequently than other bird species in bone assemblages from historic sites in North America. Recent studies on the effectiveness of metric data for identification of galliform bones found high degrees of similarity in size and morphology between wild game birds (e.g., grouse, ptarmigan) and multiple domestic or introduced species (e.g., chicken, pheasant). This finding suggests that wild taxa and less common domesticates may have been misidentified as chicken and as a result are underrepresented in these historic data...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jessica E. Watson, Sarah Heins Ledogar Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Ontogenetic dental patterns in Pleistocene hyenas (Crocuta crocuta Erxleben, 1777) and their palaeobiological implications
AbstractDuring the Pleistocene, humans and hyenas co ‐occurred at sites, which included cavities and rock‐shelters, accumulating bone assemblages attributable to both the hominids and carnivores. Studies of these co‐occurrences have given rise to much debate about the relationships established, suggesting that an interpretation of the nature of the biological activities conducted could be useful for understanding predator behaviour and for reconstructing the palaeobiology of these sites. Dentition analysis is an effective technique, employed in zooarchaeological studies, to interpret the use of shared spaces. However...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Israel Jesus Jimenez, Montserrat Sanz, Joan Daura, Ignacio De Gaspar, Nuria Garc ía Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Zoonotic parasites in feline coprolites from a holocenic mortuary context from eastern patagonia (argentina)
AbstractNowadays, wildlife is one of the most important sources of zoonoses, and it is a major concern for the public health. Nevertheless, little is known about the role of wildlife as a reservoir and source of infectious diseases in the past. South America presents a wide diversity of wildlife. In the south of the continent, Argentina shelters a large diversity of neotropical carnivores. Although the paleoparasitological studies on carnivores have been increasing in southern Argentina, most of the efforts have been focused in a handful of sites located in western Patagonia. In this paper, two coprolites of felid found in...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mar ía Ornela Beltrame, Alejandro Serna, Victoria Cañal, Luciano Prates Tags: SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Source Type: research

Fish exploitation in medieval and early modern Switzerland: evidence from the ichthyoarchaeological record and historical sources
This study shows that the fish remains from archaeological sites correspond with the descriptions in the written records: both sources point to local fisheries within Swiss freshwater systems. These fisheries were strongly regulated and often selective. Large freshwater fish of high quality were mainly caught by professional fishermen and eaten by the aristocratic and clerical classes, whereas small or young specimens were caught by all social classes even though their catch was strongly restricted. Furthermore, both sources provide evidence for an inland freshwater fish trade of selected species and for the import of herr...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Simone H äberle, Heide Hüster Plogmann Tags: SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Source Type: research

Who lived on the Swiss Plateau around 3300 BCE? ‐ Analyses of commingled Human Skeletal Remains from the Dolmen of Oberbipp
AbstractNowadays, the discovery and excavation of an undisturbed Late Neolithic dolmen is rare, as those monuments were often visible in the landscape and have been investigated or destroyed in earlier times therefore, information about the buried individuals has often been lost. The excavation of the dolmen, a stone grave chamber, from Oberbipp, Switzerland in 2012 provided a unique opportunity to study human skeletal remains from a Late Neolithic collective burial (3350 ‐2650BCE). Over 2000 fragmented and commingled skeletal elements were recovered and form the basis of this morphological study. Established morphologic...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Inga Siebke, Noah Steuri, Anja Furtw ängler, Marianne Ramstein, Gabriele Arenz, Albert Hafner, Johannes Krause, Sandra Lösch Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

A remarkable case of gout in the Imperial Rome. Surgery and diseases in Antiquity by osteoarchaeological, paleopathological and historical perspectives
This study is the result of a multidisciplinary team approach and focuses on a case of considerable historical and medical interest. The work originally stemmed from findings at a funerary site in the area of Casal Bertone in Rome (Italy), regarding an individual in a tomb identified simply by the number “75”. The skeletal alterations that were later discovered gave rise a debate among the members of the team. Challenges in identifying the pathology have brought historians, anthropologists and radiologists into the field with the use of sophisticated equipment, including CT scans and X‐ray equ ipment, as well...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gino Fornaciari, Silvia Marinozzi, Daniela Messineo, Carla Caldarini, Federica Zavaroni, Silvia Iorio, Longo Sveva, Silvia Capuani, Paola Catalano, Valentina Gazzaniga Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Evidence ‐based criteria for paleopathological recognition: New methodology suggests that the rotator cuff condition will be amenable to reliable identification in the archeologic record:
ConclusionsThere have been no validated evidence ‐based criteria applicable for recognizing rotator cuff conditions in skeletons, in the absence of soft tissue structures. Greater tuberosity osteopenia has been noted, but not yet evaluated for specificity. Rotator cuff conditions may actually be unrelated to lifestyle, but may simply represent t he accumulation/culmination of lifetime stresses (aging). The ratio of acromial lateral extension and height provides greater opportunity for confident diagnosis.Given the disconnect between presence or extent of pathology and clinical symptoms and limitations/disability, identif...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bruce M. Rothschild Tags: SHORT REPORT Source Type: research

Linear and Appositional Growth in Children as Indicators of Social and Economic Change during the Medieval Islamic to Christian transition in Santar ém, Portugal
This study explores whether child growth has signaled periods of social change between the Medieval Islamic and post ‐Islamic Christian Periods in Santarém, Portugal. The social change is associated with the Christian conquest of Iberia and the fall of the Islamic Empire in Europe, which ceased the regional influence of the Golden Age of Islam. This may have caused a deterioration in living conditions brought b y the Christian conquest, compared to the social improvements brought by the Medieval Islamic Empire. Forty‐two juvenile skeletons were taken from 3 Medieval Islamic and 3 Late Medieval Christian sites ex...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ellie Gooderham, Antonio Matias, Marco Liberato, Helena Santos, Sarah Walshaw, John Albanese, Hugo F.V. Cardoso Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Pre ‐hispanic Maya fisheries and coastal adaptations in the Northern Lowlands from the Classic (500‐900 AD) to Postclassic (900‐1400 AD) periods
AbstractRecent studies of fish remains at Mayan settlements from the Classic (500 ‐900 AD) and Postclassic (900‐1400 AD) periods are examined. These analyses deepen our understanding of ancient Maya fishing practices and coastal ecosystems and call into question traditional paradigms of environmental stability in the Northern Maya Lowlands. The effects of droughts recorded du ring the Maya collapse (800‐1000 AD) led to an overall reduction in freshwater inflow into the estuaries combined with episodic increases of sedimentary output. The latter fostered the development of muddy bottoms along the coast, in particular ...
Source: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology - June 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nayeli G. Jim énez Cano Tags: SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Source Type: research