Introduction to Body Meets Mind: Eating Disorders and Body Image—A Twenty-First Century Perspective
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - January 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Reconsidering Self Care
Abstract In light of diminishing resources in service settings, and the subsequent high risk for worker burnout, self care remains an important vehicle for promoting worker well-being. However, traditional definitions of self care are based in formulations about the nature of the self that don’t reflect paradigmatic shifts in social work practice that place increased emphasis on the multiplicity of workers’ selves, use of self and a collaborative frame for the worker–client relationship. Thus, a reconsidered definition of self care is proposed that reflects intersubjective, relational, and recove...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - January 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Body Dissatisfaction and the Relevance of Religiosity: A Focus on Ultra-Orthodox Jews in a Community Study of Adult Women
Abstract Body image dissatisfaction (BID) is one of the most robust risk factors associated with eating disturbances. However, much remains unknown about it especially regarding a potentially protective factor, namely religiosity. As shown in hundreds of studies, religiosity has consistently been associated with better health and mental health outcomes. Utilizing a large, community-based study of adult Jewish women, we compare ultra-Orthodox and Secular Jewish women, two groups at opposite ends of the religious observance spectrum. Detailed telephone interviews were conducted with a broadly representative sample o...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - January 13, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Informal Use of Information and Communication Technology: Adjunct to Traditional Face-to-Face Social Work Practice
Abstract Information and communication technologies (ICTs) (including mobile devices) are characterized by the integration of technology into communication, and have revolutionized how individuals interact. ICTs have led to transformative changes in social work and other disciplines including education and psychology. Despite becoming increasingly popular in traditional face-to-face social work practice, research is lacking on informal ICT use by practitioners with clients, which typically occurs between sessions, but also within, as an unplanned (and often unsanctioned) adjunct to traditional face-to-face practic...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - January 7, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

An Exploratory Investigation: Post-disaster Predictors of Intimate Partner Violence
This study examines the compounded vulnerability of IPV victims post-disaster by identifying the predictors of IPV and the perceived level of social and emotional support of IPV victims after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. Using a sample size of 29,480, data for the study was derived from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Gulf States Population Survey. A binary logistic regression analysis indicated that: (1) Respondents directly impacted by the oil spill were about twice as likely to experience both physical and emotional IPV; (2) Respondents who experienced both emotional and physical IPV were 5 times more...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - January 2, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Role of Relational-Oriented Supervision and Personal and Work-Related Factors in the Development of Vicarious Traumatization
Abstract The aim of the current study was to identify personal and work-related risk factors for vicarious traumatization among social workers in Israel, as well as the contribution of relational-oriented supervision in mitigating the consequences of working with traumatized clients. Data was collected from 109 social workers who were employed in various agencies. Participants were asked about their personal trauma history, trauma work experience, work-related measures of trauma exposure, and supervision characteristics. Findings showed that social workers with trauma history, who worked mainly with survivors of h...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - December 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

An Integrative Group Treatment Model for Women with Binge Eating Disorder: Mind, Body and Self in Connection
This article presents an integrative group treatment model for women with BED that has shown positive outcomes in clinical practice. The group model addresses key biopsychosocial factors associated with BED and incorporates mindfulness principles tailored to problems of the disorder. A core foundation of the group model is the relational context that fosters connections between women members and promotes self-efficacy. The discussion includes etiology of BED and current empirical support for integrating mindfulness skills in treatment for binge eating problems, as well as the author’s clinical experience in formulati...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - December 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Maneuvering Difficult Emotional Terrain in Psychotherapy: A Buddhist-Informed Conceptual Framework
This article offers a conceptual framework for approaching difficult emotions that is grounded in the wisdom of Buddhism. The framework consists of four themes that serve as guides for clients and clinicians as they maneuver emotional experiences in psychotherapy: Sitting With, Middle Path, Healthy Interdependency, and Compassion. Common threads between Buddhist concepts and Western psychotherapy approaches are explored. A case vignette will demonstrate the clinical utility of the framework. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - December 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Experiences, Burdens, and Support Needs in Siblings of Girls and Women with Anorexia Nervosa: Results from a Qualitative Interview Study
Abstract For many years, siblings of women and girls suffering from anorexia have been regarded as “the forgotten kin,” as they have been overlooked by both researchers and clinicians. Therefore, the goal of this explorative study was to investigate siblings’ experiences, burdens, and support needs in a differentiated manner. Siblings (n = 16) of patients with an ICD-10 diagnosis “anorexia nervosa” (F 50.0) took part in a qualitative, in-depth interview study; the data were assessed using content analysis. The results of this study should be especially interesting for cl...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - November 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Self Psychologist Approaches Retirement: “Forced” Termination with Highly Vulnerable Clients
Abstract Since its inception in 1973, Clinical Social Work Journal has consistently emphasized the intersubjective nature of the treatment process and the significance of the therapist’s conscious and unconscious contributions to it. In keeping with this fundamental tenet of clinical social work, which is now endorsed by virtually all psychotherapy disciplines, it is important that we acknowledge our own feelings when preparing for eventual retirement if we are to respond optimally to our clients’ feelings. In this paper, I review both the literature on “forced” terminations and the sel...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 15, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Two Case Studies on Family Work with Eating Disorders and Body Image Issues
This article highlights the need for clinicians who work with eating disorders and body image problems to address the deeper family issues underlying these symptoms. The authors propose an eclectic approach including family systems, structural and experiential family therapy theory as a guide. The paper begins with an overview of family therapy theories currently used in the treatment of eating disorders, and goes into greater detail about the three theories highlighted in the eclectic model proposed. The authors present two cases with actual case dialogue, demonstrating how they used this composite model. This article has...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 15, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Never Forget: Cognitive Restructuring Limitations in Holocaust Related Layered Trauma
Abstract The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy intervention of cognitive restructuring leads to mood stabilization by identifying, challenging, actively disputing, and ultimately replacing maladaptive and irrational thoughts and behaviors. The case study of an adult child of Holocaust survivors explores the limitations of success with cognitive restructuring. In this case, transgenerational transmission of trauma as a second generation Holocaust survivor was the first of several subsequent first-hand experienced traumas. These additional traumas, as well as the primary coping mechanism of overeating leading to diet-res...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 15, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Eating Disorders and Body Image Concerns Among Male Athletes
This article illustrates how eating disorders as well as body image dissatisfaction manifest themselves in male athletes, how difficult it can be to engage them in psychotherapy, and how clinicians can address these concerns. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Using Objectification Theory to Examine the Effects of Media on Gay Male Body Image
Abstract Research has increasingly noted that gay male adults are more at risk for developing body image dissatisfaction than other male populations. Body image issues warrant attention, particularly since they have been connected to the development of disordered eating patterns. Studies have often traced gay male body dissatisfaction to various sociocultural elements and phenomena, particularly the media. In fact, various media genres have been implicated as being instrumental in propagating idealized male physiques, which in turn may negatively influence observers. Using objectification theory, this paper aims t...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 13, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Health at Every Size and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Obese, Depressed Women: Treatment Development and Clinical Application
Abstract Treatments for women with obesity, depression, and body image concerns are not optimal. Weight loss programs lead to long-term weight gain for most participants, and even successful participants typically sustain only modest weight loss. Psychotherapy for depression is more effective, but as many as 50 % do not fully remit. When depression and obesity co-occur in women, outcomes are even more modest. Innovative treatments are needed to enhance the physical and mental health of obese, depressed women. The goal of the current paper is to describe the development of a treatment that integrates two innov...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gender Socialization, Countertransference and the Treatment of Men with Eating Disorders
This article focuses on how gender socialization and internalized views of masculinity affect client, therapist and the co-created therapeutic relationship. Male and female therapists can use awareness of gender influences to improve their ability to detect and communicate their gendered countertransference reactions. The article concludes with a discussion of how gendered assumptions and emotional reactions can affect treatment team interactions and treatment program protocols. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Seeking the Hiding: Working Through Parental Infidelity
Abstract Patients whose parents have had affairs are impacted by such a rupture in myriad ways. The meaning of the affair for the child at the time and its connection to his or her current relationship and communication patterns may not be immediately apparent to patients when they first seek treatment. Gaining insight into the connection may be pivotal in helping patients understand and accept hidden parts of themselves, such as repressed or dissociated anger and jealousy. Using case studies, I explored these connections and how working through them provided relief and growth without patients succumbing to the de...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Adopted Children with Reactive Attachment Disorder: A Qualitative Study on Family Processes
This article discusses the results of a study that examined the processes that occur in families who adopt children with RAD. Guided by the principles of grounded theory, this study employed a multi-stage semi-structured interview design. The sample consisted of five adoptive families from the Midwest, and included both adult and child participants. The findings revealed six prominent themes: Parents report difficulty educating others about RAD; obtaining the needed care and services was a constant fight; RAD behavior is socially isolating; and raising a child with RAD is continuously stressful. Older siblings felt com...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - September 23, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Find Your Beat: Therapeutic Drumming for Parkinson’s Disease
This article examines a therapeutic drumming program offered to patients with Parkinson’s disease at a large teaching hospital in the United States. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - September 11, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Psychodynamic Issues in the Treatment of Binge Eating: Working with Shame, Secrets, No-Entry, and False Body Defenses
Abstract Two clinical moments from patients in treatment for Binge Eating Disorder (DSM 5) are described where a manifest problem with body image difficulty was initially denied. Each patient entered treatment with the desire to lose weight as well as gain a fuller understanding of self and mastery over addictive eating patterns that caused considerable psychological anguish. An integrated treatment matrix of practical, contemporary psychodynamic interventions and more behavioral, experiential and supportive tools allowed each patient to uncover and work through heretofore split off aspects of their bodily sel...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Impact of Aging on Clinical Practice: A Developmental Challenge
Abstract The biological, psychological, and social developments that naturally occur as we age have repercussions in our work as therapists. Indeed, aging presents a developmental challenge to both clinicians and patients. Shifts in professional and personal identity as well as perception of practice are common for therapists. This is especially true for therapists who have experienced long careers over 30 or 40 years and have had the benefit of reflecting on these changes. We experience our therapeutic relationships in new and meaningful ways that create profound lessons about our patients and ourselves. Our...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Supporting Children After a Disaster: A Case Study of a Psychosocial School-Based Intervention
This study, conducted in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, after a series of tornadoes struck the city in 2011, examines the Journey of Hope (JoH), a psychosocial program designed to help children cope with disaster related stressors. It employed a case study approach examining the program’s impact through interviews with 5 social workers, 14 program facilitators and 30 child participants. Findings revealed that participating in the JoH helped children: articulate their feelings, process grief, regulate emotions such as anger and aggression, and gain knowledge on how to handle bullying behaviors in their school. This article buil...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Interview with Susie Orbach, Ph.D., C.S.W.
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Conceptual Framework to Enhance Community Resilience Using Social Capital
Abstract Community resilience has been recognized and promoted as both a vision and a strategy for disaster management. This paper establishes the importance of community resilience in disaster management, describes disaster management phases and the disaster system of care, reviews definitions and dimensions of community resilience and related foundational concepts (social groups, social networks, and social capital), and endorses a conceptual framework for enhancing community resilience through social capital. Resilience, both personal and community resilience, is increased by the social capital that emerges fro...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Clinical Social Work, Science, and Doctoral Education: Schisms or Synergy?
Abstract Recent trends in social work have widened the schism between science and clinical social work. Ph.D. programs have become ever more oriented to grant-funded research and to preparing graduates for research-dominated careers. Academics have been developing a definition of a “science of social work” so the profession can claim its scientific base. The evidence-based practice movement and funders’ mandates to use evidence-supported practice techniques have created dilemmas for practitioners, whose views of these developments, positive and negative, are described. Some now argue for “...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 7, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Consideration of Maternal Developmental Needs in the Treatment of Infant Sleep Problems
Abstract Parents often seek help because of difficulties their infants have transitioning to and maintaining sleep. Sleep problems almost inevitably adversely impact parental sleep which can affect the parent’s psychological state and the parent–infant relationship. This paper examines interventions for infant sleep problems within a context that includes recognition of maternal developmental needs. Clinical case material of mothers in different stages of adult development illustrates ways in which maternal developmental needs both influenced their children’s sleep patterns that became problemati...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 7, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Everything Ends: Identity and the Therapist’s Retirement
Abstract This paper explores two sides of the coin with respect to the topic of the aging therapist in clinical practice: a diminution of health resulting in an inability to recognize the need to retire and a choice to retire while in good health to pursue other ways of living. It is my position that some distinguished practitioners of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy, for a myriad of complicated reasons, are unable to deal with the diminution of their faculties—a symptom of dementia—that renders them incapable of making a critical assessment as to whether they should continue to practice. Usi...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 4, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Clinical Social Work Practice in the Twenty-First Century: A Changing Landscape
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 1, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The DSW: From Skeptic to Convert
Abstract The author traces the history of the original DSW degree in relation to the Ph.D. which was viewed as the more respected, rigorous, and traditional degree, essentially replacing the DSW in social work doctoral programs. Following the trend of practice doctorates in the health care field, beginning with the Psy.D. in Psychology, the DSW as a practice-oriented doctoral degree reemerged in 2007 and programs have been proliferating at a rate of approximately one per year. Initially a skeptic, through exposure in various capacities, the author came to appreciate the important gap that advanced practiti...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 1, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Epilogue: Clinical Social Work Practice—Past, Present, and Future
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 1, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Evidence-Based Practice in Social Work: A Contemporary Perspective
Abstract This paper aims to provide a contemporary overview of evidence-based practice (EBP) in social work. As EBP is frequently misunderstood, we will define what EBP is as well as what it is not. In addition, we discuss some of the current challenges that social workers and the profession continue to face in integrating EBP into professional practice. Specifically, we identify concerns that practitioners have raised and include challenges related to social work education and agency concerns. We will conclude the paper with recommendations on how social workers can integrate EBP across practice settings with...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Privatization in the Human Services: Implications for Direct Practice
Abstract Human service agencies and front line practitioners are well known for the quality of services they provide to individuals, families, and communities. The last three decades of austerity-driven public policies—especially privatization—have restructured the human services in ways that have dramatically affected agencies, practitioners and clients. Yet we know very little about how this policy affects the practice experience of front line workers. Based on a literature review and preliminary qualitative results from a survey of human service workers in the public and non-profits sectors in ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Noticing Indicators of Emerging Change in the Psychotherapy of a Borderline Patient
Abstract Clinicians are encouraged to collect feedback from patients through ongoing, patient-report questionnaires to monitor treatment response and assess change. These instruments rely on a patient’s self-reporting functional impairment, distress, and corresponding changes. This presents particular challenges when working with individuals diagnosed with a personality disorder due to the nature of their psychopathology. A pragmatic solution is for the clinician to notice certain affective, defensive, and cognitive markers, which can serve as observable indicators of emerging change in the patient’s p...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Meaning of “Place” to Older Adults
Abstract Social workers are well-equipped to work with older adults and their families. The life course perspective provides a framework for seeing older adulthood as a stage of life in the continuum of life as well as a stage with its own characteristics and tasks. All the roles within social work practice can be adapted to this population. In addition, social workers working with older adults and their families must be cognizant of the specific issues that are associated with aging and older adulthood. The issue of loss on many levels is a frequent topic. One area of loss that is not frequently addressed is the ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

What Clinical Social Workers Need to Know: Bio-psycho-social Knowledge and Skills for the Twenty First Century
Abstract In this paper, we define clinical social work and the current context of practice. We then discuss social work education, the changes we have noted in the last 10–15 years, including those that have been detrimental to clinical social work training. Most prominent are the de-emphasis of supervision and of psychodynamic theories and practice. Next, we define what we see as essential knowledge and skills for training future clinical social workers. We speculate on what future mental health service needs may be and argue for maintaining a biopsychosocial, and psychodynamic perspective in training ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Caught in a Web of Multiple Jeopardy: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and HIV-Positive Asylum Seekers in Scotland
Abstract Many HIV-positive asylum seekers have experienced multiple traumas and human rights violations—circumstances that engender posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This qualitative study examines the impact of PTSD symptoms among HIV-positive asylum seekers in Scotland. Data were collected from 19 participants, using open-ended interviews, and narrative analysis was used to develop significant themes. All respondents had significant traumatic experiences, such as physical and sexual assault, witnessing the beating and death of a loved one, and being forced to participate in the sex trade. Many experien...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 1, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Cultural Intelligence for Clinical Social Work Practice
This article delineates the dynamics of tapping into “cultural intelligence”, which uses a different approach to understanding cultural diversity and cross-cultural interactions by focusing on the interactional field that operates in cross-cultural clinical encounters. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 26, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Listening to Words, Hearing Feelings: Links Between Eating Disorders and Alexithymia
Abstract Research suggests that eating disorders often involve difficulty with affect regulation and processing of emotions. Studies also show that many individuals with these difficulties suffer from alexithymia, or an impaired ability to use language to tolerate or process emotions. Many clients with eating disorders are highly verbal, able to talk about feelings and even have good insight into the causes of their behaviors. Yet their verbal and cognitive strengths may disguise their inability to use thoughts to manage their emotions. Such clients often have a lifelong experience of appearing more capable an...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 19, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Eating Disorder Treatment as a Process of Mind–Body Integration: Special Challenges for Women
Abstract The concept of body image remains too focused on internal representation and not enough on internal experiencing. Body image is but one expression of the more foundational body self. When an eating disorder is conceptualized as an attempt to manage an impaired sense of body self (and associated disregulation), the ultimate goal of treatment becomes embodiment. The eating disordered body must be worked with as an actual as well as symbolic body and understood within its own developmental trajectory. The gender-specificity of eating disorders is explored by focusing on three particular bodily challenges for...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Transformation Through Attachment: The Power of Relationship in Clinical Social Work
Abstract This case study illustrates the power of the therapeutic relationship that developed between the author and a woman who experienced early relational trauma and childhood sexual trauma, and who suffered from depression, alcohol dependence and bulimia. Examining three and a half years of individual psychotherapy through the lens of attachment theory, the client’s relationship to the author appeared to mimic an early attachment relationship and this psychotherapeutic attachment appeared to have contributed to the repair of the client’s own insecure attachment to her mother. Through the course of ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Body-States, Body Image and Dissociation: When Not-Me is ‘Not Body’
Abstract The relationship between dissociation, eating disorders and disordered eating is key as it relates to dissociative disruptions to body image. It undermines normal integration of appearance-relevant information and cuts off access to subjective experience and feeling states necessary to form an internal representation of one’s self and body. This vulnerability contributes to body image distortions and the uncritical internalization of society’s notion of the thin ideal—which is an unrealistic standard, that leads, in turn, to body dissatisfaction. Patients with eating disorders live under...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 4, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Contemporary Clinical Practice: A Private Practitioner’s Perspective
This article suggests that for the experienced social worker, private practice is part of a natural developmental process that can be deeply congruent with the values of the profession. However, there continues to be relatively little support within the academy for private practice. The more important question today may be: Has the social work profession forsaken the private practitioner? (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - May 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Phenomenology in End-of-Life Care: Implications for Philosophy and Clinical Practice
Abstract Care of the terminally ill and dying in the hospice setting is a growing practice field for social workers. Support to family, as well as the patient, is implicit in hospice care, adding to the reach and impact of the hospice social worker’s role. As people age and approach the end of life, they may encounter changes in their experience of time, space and of the material world. They often have to redefine the role of hope in their day to day lives. Based on these changing experiences and perceptions, phenomenology, with its focus on a patient’s subjective, lived experience, has implications fo...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

On the Importance of Direct Practice Experience Among Clinical Social Work Faculty: A Recent Graduate’s Perspective
Abstract Clinical social work is a mature specialty within the profession of social work, with its own distinct knowledge base, array of theories, and approaches to practice. Schools of social work are tasked with educating clinical social workers to practice competently, effectively, and ethically. One vital pedagogic tool that faculty members employ is drawing from their own direct practice experience, in order to provide guidance and context to students’ questions related to practice. This application of direct practice experience is fundamental to the development of novice clinical social work practition...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 23, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Educating Graduate Social Work Students in Disaster Response: A Real-Time Case Study
Abstract Social workers are mental health first-responders in disaster events, yet that role has been relatively underemphasized in social work curriculum for agency-based practice. The recent increasing number of disaster-related events has challenged schools of social work to respond with curriculum and field placements that meet the student demand for education in disaster behavior health. This paper describes how a real-time education and training program for disaster response was created and adopted into an existing graduate social work school curriculum. It also details how new field placements were created,...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Friends in Old Age
Abstract Psychoanalysis has long recognized the vital role that relationships between people play in human development and in the maintenance of sense of well being throughout life. While the internalization of representations of significant others and their interactions with each other, the achievement of object constancy, makes it possible to gain support from the realization that we live in the minds of others and they in ours’, it is “not enough.” We need people “in the flesh” from “cradle to grave.” Unfortunately, this need is more difficult to meet in our later years...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 3, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Technology, Relationships and Culture: Clinical and Theoretical Implications
Abstract The increasing popularity of the Internet and social media has generated concerns and disputes about their effects on brain, behavior, and relationships. While many positive outcomes are associated with cybercommunication, some individuals experience negative consequences. This, in turn, has roused theoretical and clinical debates about the impact of technology on psychotherapy and the stances therapists should take in their own work with clients. Understanding the emerging digital culture, which includes how the Internet, social media, video games, reality, identity, relationships, and the self are expe...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - March 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Cyber Counseling: Illuminating Benefits and Challenges
Abstract The ascendancy of the cyber world has led to increasing client demand for online counseling and a dramatic growth in cyber counseling, a trend that is expected to continue in the coming years. Recognizing the need for social workers who can competently utilize communication technology in their practice, we developed a 4-year pilot project as a practicum in which second year MSW students provided cyber and face-to-face counseling to undergraduate students who presented with a range of issues. The purpose of this paper is to report on an exploratory study which examined the perspectives of the student inte...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - March 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Clinical Social Work in a Digital Environment: Ethical and Risk-Management Challenges
Abstract Clinical social workers’ use of digital and other technology to provide distance counseling services is proliferating. Increasing numbers of contemporary practitioners are using video counseling, email chat, social networking websites, text messaging, smartphone apps, avatar-based websites, self-guided web-based interventions, and other technology to provide clinical services to clients, some of whom they may never meet in person. The advent of this technology has produced a wide range of ethical challenges related to social workers’ application of traditional social work ethics concepts: cli...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - March 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Transference and Countertransference Issues During Times of Violent Political Conflict: The Arab Therapist–Jewish Patient Dyad
Abstract The complexity of long-term, dynamically oriented psychotherapy with a patient who belongs to an “enemy” national group, requires more than cultural sensitivity, especially during ongoing violent political conflict. This paper deals with some of the transference–countertransference dynamics that face therapists from a minority group involved in a political conflict with the patient’s majority group. Clinical examples from the Palestinian therapist–Jewish patient therapeutic dyad are presented in order to clarify these issues as they relate to setting, contract, interpreta...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - March 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research