The Queer Utility of Narrative Case Studies for Clinical Social Work Research and Practice
AbstractThe author uses a queer critical lens to analyze the marginalization of case study research in the evidence-based practice model of clinical social work. He argues that narrative case studies are necessary for the production of context-dependent knowledge about social work practice and asserts that the method offers particular utility in conducting queer inquiry. The method is explored in relation to its capacity to describe non-normative phenomena and the impact of normative cultural pressures on queer subjects. An abbreviated case study by the author is included to demonstrate these capacities. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Developing a Problem-Solving Treatment for Gulf War Illness: Cognitive Rehabilitation of Veterans with Complex Post-Deployment Health Concerns
AbstractSocial workers play an essential role in facilitating veterans ’ reintegration into their communities and daily lives. Many veterans, particularly those who have been deployed, experience comorbid physical, psychological, and neurocognitive problems that significantly impact their health function in multiple domains. Veterans deployed to Operation Desert Shie ld/Operation Desert Storm have reported a wide range of persistent, diverse, medically unexplained symptoms that have come to be known as Gulf War Illness (GWI). These symptoms make it difficult for veterans to participate in daily activities, thereby im...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - February 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Predicting What Will Happen When You Intervene
AbstractThis paper offers some rules of thumb that practicing social workers can use for case studies that aim to construct, albeit not fully and never entirely reliably, models designed to help predict what will happen if they intervene in specific ways to help this particular client, here and now. We call these ’ex ante case-specific causal models’. ’Ex ante’ because they are for before-the-fact prediction of what the likely effects of proposed actions are. ’Case-specific’ because we are not concerned with studies that provide evidence for some general conclusion but rather with using ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - February 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

“Bridging Several Worlds”: The Process of Identity Development of Second-Generation Ethiopian and Eritrean Young Women in Canada
AbstractThis paper explores the social and cultural experiences of second-generation Ethiopian and Eritrean young women in relationship to expectations surrounding identity continuity by way of maintenance of traditional culture. From the analysis of ten in-depth interviews, complexities in family relationships emerged as a major category with interrelated concepts that particularize the social and cultural experiences of second-generation Ethiopian and Eritrean women with their process of identity formation. These included gendered intergenerational relationships whereby Ethiopian and Eritrean parents maintained a strong ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - February 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Case and Frame: Teaching Case Study Composition
AbstractHere is an explanation of the case and frame pedagogy that I use to teach case study composition. It is a “how-to” type teaching resource that describes a general outline of my work with students, and it is a “why” I think it is important to teach the case study. I use an example from my class to show how I take case material from its beginning stages and help a writer to craft her case study as a project in self-reflexivity and narrative with interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks. I discuss the intersection of the social sciences and the humanities in the case study as a way to de-silo k...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - February 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Living “Illegally”: On the Phenomenology of an Undocumented Immigrant
This article is a phenomenological exploration and description of particular aspects of living as an undocumented immigrant. In lieu of a political or economic approach to describe the undocumented immigrant experience, the phenomenological method I utilize allows for a more intimate exchange. What follows, then, is a necessarily detailed and subjective —albeit partial—exploration of my lived conscious experience: making sense of fixed limitations, the need to substantiate my worthiness, the embodiment of perpetual and pervasive fear, as well as my exploration of free will and the question of agency. I explore ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - January 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Clinicians ’ Reverie as Private Enactments
AbstractThis paper introduces a concept the authors refer to as private enactments. While the majority of the relational literature has focused on the more dramatic enactments in treatment, private enactments emerge as the therapist becomes aware through reveries and personal associations that she is facing a parallel struggle with the patient, one shaped by the unfolding relational unconscious cocreated in treatment. These moments are private in the sense that the therapist experiences them internally after a period of sustained, often confusing private reflection during moments of clinical impasse. The authors elucidate ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - January 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Psychoanalytic Contributions to the Understanding of Vulnerable Populations: A Case Illustration
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - November 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Triads in Equine-Assisted Social Work Enhance Therapeutic Relationships with Self-Harming Adolescents
This study aimed to reveal, through qualitative methods, the dyads within the triad that become stronger during the process of EASW, as well as the effect of the participation of the horse on the relationship between the counselor and client. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with nine female self-harming clients aged 15 –21 years and eight staff members. The interviews, together with video-recorded human–horse interactions with three staff members and four clients were analyzed, resulting in additional issues answered by these three staff members and four clients in a second interview. Criti...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - November 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Pragmatic Case Study in Psychotherapy: A Mixed Methods Approach Informed by Psychology ’s Striving for Methodological Quality
AbstractAt least as far back as Plato and Aristotle, psychology began as a stepchild of philosophy. The establishment by Wilhelm Wundt in 1879 of the first formal psychological laboratory focused on studying psychophysiological phenomena was psychology ’s declaration of independence as a discipline. By positioning itself as the application of natural-science-based, empirical methods involving quantitative, group-based approaches to psychological topics, the discipline consolidated its independence and its societal status and clout. This paper fi rst summarizes these developments, to highlight the causes of psychology...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - November 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Case Study Method in Psychodynamic Psychology: Focus on Addiction
AbstractThe case study method has been essential in psychoanalysis and psychodynamic therapy, since it is the only way to describe and explore the deepest levels of the human psyche. Addiction is no more and no less than a particular psychological mechanism, identical at its core to other psychological compulsions, and is therefore best understood and reported by this method that explores the mind in depth. We will discuss the value of the case report method in general and in specific with regard to psychoanalysis and addiction, criticisms raised about this method, and comparisons of it with nomothetic research. (Source: C...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - November 7, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Dyadic Traumatic Reenactment: An Integration of Psychoanalytic Approaches to Working with Negative Interaction Cycles in Couple Therapy with Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors
AbstractChildhood sexual abuse (CSA) survivors often face difficulties in their intimate relationships and struggle to engage in the process of couple therapy. Recent research has demonstrated that the negative interaction cycles of CSA survivors are more complex and entrenched than those of couples who do not present with a history of trauma (MacIntosh in J Couple Fam Psychoanal 3(2):188 –207,2013). This paper integrates the psychoanalytic concepts of repetition and enactment into the concept of the negative interaction cycle as articulated by Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT), to provide an expanded understanding o...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - November 3, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Change Research: Narrating Social Change from the Bottom-Up
In conclusion, I discuss the somewhat ironic challenges of trying to increase the legitimacy of such activist research in applied fields like social work where a n obsession with being seen as scientific is prevalent as a means to improve prestige of applied research. I discuss how we need less top-down research which focuses on a “what works” agenda that serves the management of subordinate populations and more research that provides bottom-up understan dings of a “what’s right” agenda tailored to empowering people in particular settings. Real social science research needs to listen to how pe...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Discussion: Case of Colette
AbstractThe case of Colette is discussed with “reading” considered as a metaphor for the process of thinking about the traumatic experiences to which Colette has been subject. From this perspective, there is a parallel between her work with Dr. Ganzer and her struggles around attending her program’s reading class. Consideration is given t o issues around termination in public sector clinical work. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - October 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Kleinian Conceptualization of Heroin Addiction, Part 1: The Paranoid-Schizoid Position
This article presents a theoretical framework for understanding heroin addiction, which is based on Melanie Klein ’s developmental theory, as it pertains to primary mental states. Its main premise is that Klein’s paranoid-schizoid position has many similarities to active drug addiction, and that heroin addicts use the same defense mechanisms as infants in coping with the anxieties arising from their struggl e with a persecutory internal and external reality. The similarity between the conflicts that characterize a drug addict’s mental life and the dramas that characterize an infant’s internal world ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - September 17, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

God as Selfobject and the Therapeutic Potential of Divine Failure
This article explores the potential for psychological growth inherent in a relationship with God. The ability to acknowledge and mentally process divine failure—those moments where for the believer God does not offer sought after support—seem to be the primary catalyst for exercising this potential growth. Clinical examples are provided to demonstrate how a relationship with God can be addressed in a therapeutic context. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - September 13, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Hiding in Plain Sight: The Significance of Recognizing What is Hidden
AbstractThis case commentary considers relational psychoanalytic treatment with a marginalized, traumatized client. It illustrates the centrality of a mutually developed, psychoanalytically informed generative relationship in clinical practice with oppressed clients. Such relationships promote the freedom to think, to reflect, and to make sense of one ’s experience. Treatment aims to help clients bear traumatic experiences, to deepen their subjectivity and to claim a sense of agency in their lives. Development of these capacities is especially important for work with oppressed clients since their histories and living...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - September 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Response to “Becoming Visible: The Case of Collette”
AbstractThe clinician ’s experiences of race outside of the treatment room contribute to the formation of a racialized self, which influences clinical work with all clients notwithstanding race. Multiracial individuals at times must balance their external physical presentation—and the corresponding race-related categ ories that others place on them—with their own internally constructed racial identifications. The mechanisms of identification and disidentification can provide safety for the multiracial individual. How can clinicians effectively acknowledge their own identifications and disidentifications a...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - September 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Perceptions and Experiences of an Attachment-Based Intervention for Parents Troubled by Intimate Partner Violence
In this study, 26 parents (16 mothers and 10 fathers) with a history of IPV participated in focus groups concerning their attachment-based group intervention experience in th e program Parenting and Violence. The transcripts, subjected to thematic analysis, showed that participants experienced the intervention as supportive and confirming of their role as parents. Parents described feeling more in control, more self-confident, more skilled in communicating, and more able to provide security for their children. However, they also expressed a need for continuing support to maintain their improved parenting strategies. (Sourc...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - September 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

How I Work, Then and Now: My Response to the Commentaries
AbstractThis response to the commentaries on Becoming Visible: The Case of Colette considers how creative reading of clinical material allows us to enter a text from multiple perspectives and examines how meaning is produced through personal and theoretical lenses of the commentators and becomes a form of supervision. The author reflects on  how she would work with the patient today and how she views the supervisory process. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - September 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

From Despair to Integrity: Using Narrative Therapy for Older Individuals in Erikson ’s Last Stage of Identity Development
AbstractAdults aged 65 and over are a growing population in the United States today. This population is underrepresented in the mental health literature despite the high rates of depression and suicide. Additionally, the newest generation of older individuals is more likely to seek therapy than past generations, furthering the need for mental health professionals to be prepared for treating older individuals. Erikson in Childhood and society, Norton, New York, (1950) describes this time period as being critical in terms of the final identity crisis, integrity versus despair. Integrity is marked by a positive evaluation of ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 17, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

I See Your Face Before Me: Some Thoughts on Carol Ganzer ’s Becoming Visible
AbstractThis commentary on Dr Ganzer ’s thoughtful account of her work with a challenging patient in a residential treatment setting is organized around three areas of interest. The first concerns the residential setting itself that, in my experience, is often characterized by tensions reflecting the complex interactions between the therapist, the patient and the staff. I note that the setting also provides a window into the patient’s experience beyond the psychotherapeutic hour. Secondly, I explore the patient’s history with an eye to its place in the treatment and the emergence of significant metaphors ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 10, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Neuropsychoanalytic Approach to Case Studies
AbstractNeuropsychoanalysis is an interdisciplinary field that attempts to generate links between psychoanalytic schools and the neurosciences. Historically speaking, neuropsychoanalysis emerged as a response to ‘cognitive’ views of the mind/brain problem, which tended to neglect the influence of emotional and instinctual processes in the constitution, and functioning, of the human mind. Since its origins, neuropsychoanalysis has used case studies, of brain injured individuals undergoing psychoanalytic treatment, to explore how focal damage to specific brain areas is related to changes in non-cognitive domains ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 3, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Pregnant Therapist: A Qualitative Examination of the Client Experience
This study seeks to begin to redress that crucial missing perspective by interviewing the cl ients of pregnant therapists, as well as first-time, formerly pregnant therapists. This article will look at the coded results of this qualitative study and the emergent themes from the client perspective, as well as discuss their implications for clinical social work practice. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - August 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A Lacanian Perspective on the Case of Colette
Abstract A Lacanian perspective privileges speech as the motor of cure in the treatment of this borderline patient. In assuming such an ethical position, the clinician fostered a symbolic transference marked by an outburst of rage that signified a rupture of her entanglement with her mother. In this way, the clinician ’s promotion of “full speech” breached the patient’s defensive need for “invisibility” and led her to produce a socially useful project. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Invisibility of Whiteness in Clinical Practice: Case Commentary on “Becoming Visible: The Case of Colette”
Abstract My critical analysis of “Becoming Visible: The Case of Colette” is informed by Lee and Bhuyan’s (Soc Serv Rev 87:98–130, 2013 ) approach to analyze cross-cultural clinical practice. It examines “invisible” discursive moments that functionally reproduce sociocultural power dynamics of discrimination and oppression within the clinical encounter. I explored several threads of the therapy narrative to make visible privileged identities and ideologies, such as the normative performance of w hiteness. In addition, my commentary demonstrates alternative narratives that resituate clini...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Colette: A Clinical Case Management Perspective
Abstract In this commentary, the author illustrates how a clinical case management approach would address Collette ’s environmental concerns alongside her psychic trauma. Appreciating the agency's function of helping homeless women function independently within a 12 month time frame, a clinical case management approach considers an array of interventions which would address the client's economic concerns along side her wish to regain custody of her children. While these environmental interventions are undoubtedly impacted by her trauma history, clinical social workers must intervene with both the client's inner and ...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Progress in Social and Educational Inquiry Through Case Study: Generalization or Explanation?
Abstract Although much of the most productive research in applied social science is case-based, there is still concern about the restricted utility of such research because of its limited power to offer generalizable findings. Such concern has contributed to a recent trend in policy-making circles —particularly those in education—to prefer experimentally orientated research for insights on policy. The argument is made here that concerns about generalization are exaggerated and that the focus upon them has allowed an evasion of issues about quality of explanation coming from different form s of social inquiry d...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Becoming Audible: Discussion of the Case of Colette
Abstract This commentary is a response to the case of Colette, a young woman whose self-esteem was severely wounded by sexual and verbal abuse. The commentary highlights the patient ’s mourning for the better life she might have had. It asks who the clinician needed to be, in order to treat Colette. Fortunately, Colette’s therapist helped her find her voice, in a compassionate and ultimately healing treatment. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Breaking the Chains of Psychological Handcuffing: Transference to a Young, White Therapist
Abstract In this case commentary, I offered my musings related to what I imagined thinking about if I encountered Colette in psychotherapy, highlighting potential interpersonal dynamics that could infuse the treatment relationship. I explored several clinical issues, including themes of race, repetition of abuse, enactments, working with trauma, and other unconscious dynamics at play in the treatment of traumatized patients. These thoughts were provided from the perspective of a young, White therapist who practices from a relational position. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Becoming Visible: The Case of Colette
Abstract The case describes a 1-year treatment, by an early career professional, of Colette, a homeless woman with significant childhood trauma and a history of substance use. As the treatment unfolds, Colette begins to participate in activities at the residence where she lives, becomes visible, and relates her story to others. The case illustrates work with complex issues through a psychoanalytic lens. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - July 15, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Embracing the Contribution of Both Behavioral and Cognitive Theories to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Maximizing the Richness
Abstract Cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the most popular intervention models used by social workers and other mental health professionals. CBT stems from two very distinct and unique theoretical paradigms with rich histories. Yet, in practice, the full potential of the model is not realized as behavioral theories are applied as secondary to cognitive theories. In this paper, we present a brief overview of the histories of both cognitive and behavioral theories, a summary of their explanatory and intervention theories, and describe how they have been merged to date to create an intervention mode...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Later Life Stages —Generativity Versus Cultural Stereotypes: Treatment Considerations
Abstract This work addresses divergent perspectives about the later life stages and elaborates upon the many-sided conflicts and challenges for those in their later years, which I choose to call “the Age of Wisdom and Experience”. It also addresses treatment implications in our work with those in their later stages, and the confusions and possible impasses which can occur when patients and their therapists are in the same later life stage. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Find Your Beat: Therapeutic Drumming for Parkinson ’s Disease
This article examines a therapeutic drumming program offered to patients with Parkinson’s disease at a large teaching hospital in the United States. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Introduction of Clinician ’s Thoughts on Aging
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Everything Ends: Identity and the Therapist ’s Retirement
Abstract This paper explores two sides of the coin with respect to the topic of the aging therapist in clinical practice: a diminution of health resulting in an inability to recognize the need to retire and a choice to retire while in good health to pursue other ways of living. It is my position that some distinguished practitioners of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy, for a myriad of complicated reasons, are unable to deal with the diminution of their faculties —a symptom of dementia—that renders them incapable of making a critical assessment as to whether they should continue to practice. Using mate...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Enhancing Parenting Practices with Latino/a Immigrants: Integrating Evidence-Based Knowledge and Culture According to the Voices of Latino/a Parents
Abstract Effective and emotionally nurturing parenting practices constitute salient protective factors in the lives of children and youth. Although social workers have influenced in important ways the scholarship associated with the development and dissemination of culturally relevant evidence-based parenting interventions for underserved populations, low-income ethnic minorities continue to lack access to culturally relevant and efficacious parenting interventions in the United States due to widespread mental health disparities. Addressing this gap in service delivery is necessary, particularly because population...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - June 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Rethinking Professional Identity in a Globalized World
Abstract Recent literature has shed light on changes in the development of personal identity as a result of globalization, but the development of professional identity in the era of globalization has not yet been examined. To fill this gap, we analyzed this issue in light of the traditional construction of the social work profession, the paradigm of cultural competence and cultural relativism, and International Social Work programs. The analysis revealed that professional efforts to cope with globalization might have the opposite effect by reinforcing individualism, nationalism, and oppression, as well as by reinf...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - May 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

In Memoriam
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - May 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Introduction of Clinician’s Thoughts on Aging
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - May 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Factors that Support the Use of Child –Parent Psychotherapy as an Intervention for Child–Parent Dyads Exposed to Pediatric Medical Traumatic Stress
Abstract Clinical interventions for young children who experience medical traumatic stress are needed however the effectiveness of treatments remains unclear. This paper explores the current conceptual literature for clinical interventions with young children who have experienced medical traumatic stress. Concepts from trauma and attachment theories are examined and applied to a case composite. In addition, empirical literature related to interventions with young children who have experienced medical traumatic stress will be reviewed. Child – parent psychotherapy (CPP) —is identified as a promising interventi...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Factors that Support the Use of Child–Parent Psychotherapy as an Intervention for Child–Parent Dyads Exposed to Pediatric Medical Traumatic Stress
Abstract Clinical interventions for young children who experience medical traumatic stress are needed however the effectiveness of treatments remains unclear. This paper explores the current conceptual literature for clinical interventions with young children who have experienced medical traumatic stress. Concepts from trauma and attachment theories are examined and applied to a case composite. In addition, empirical literature related to interventions with young children who have experienced medical traumatic stress will be reviewed. Child–parent psychotherapy (CPP)—is identified as a promising interv...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 20, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Starting Where the Client Is: Harm Reduction Guidelines for Clinical Social Work Practice
This article reiterates that harm reduction is a viable approach to clinical social work practice with individuals who have drug- and alcohol-related problems and for whom traditional approaches may be inappropriate. It focuses on harm reduction therapy as an emerging treatment model that can be implemented by clinical social workers and mental-health and substance use treatment providers. The article identifies and elaborates several basic tenets that can be incorporated into clinical social work. It is hoped that social workers who learn how harm reduction is implemented in clinical practice will be more apt to incorpora...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Experiential Learning: Developing Insights About Working with Older Adults
Abstract The experience of teaching a graduate seminar on aging led us to adapt and augment our teaching perspectives and approaches to help students gain insight into their own limitations in working with older adults. Role-play exercises helped students bring their own family of origin, personal experiences, biases, and beliefs about older adults into bold relief. New-found insights from these lived experiences included better understanding and appreciation for transference and countertransference issues, which are often overlooked or given short shrift in our training and work with older adults. Long considered...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - April 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Later Life Stages—Generativity Versus Cultural Stereotypes: Treatment Considerations
Abstract This work addresses divergent perspectives about the later life stages and elaborates upon the many-sided conflicts and challenges for those in their later years, which I choose to call “the Age of Wisdom and Experience”. It also addresses treatment implications in our work with those in their later stages, and the confusions and possible impasses which can occur when patients and their therapists are in the same later life stage. (Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - March 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Jewish Self-Hatred: The Internalization of Prejudice
Abstract Throughout history, the Jewish people have been despised and abused. As with other large groups subjected to trauma, they have developed deep psychological scars as well as defense mechanisms for coping with it. One manifestation of this trauma is Jewish self-hatred, which though considered common has been largely ignored by clinical social workers, including those who are Jewish. Understanding the etiology and psychodynamics of this self-hatred initially requires an examination of the history and large group psychology of the Jewish people. Only then can this form of self-hatred be understood in the indi...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - March 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Intersubjective Experience of the Physical Body in the Clinical Setting of Eating Disorders
Abstract This paper will illuminate one dimension of self-disclosure as it relates to the inescapable presence of the body in treatment, and the female clinician’s ability to bring her physical body into clinical discussions during an encounter with a female client with an eating disorder. Although the clinical literature on eating disorders validates that transference and countertransference issues are particularly powerful, it generally neglects the exploration of these issues specific to the body’s physical presentation. Since body dissatisfaction is increasingly normative for women today, female c...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - February 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Hegemonic Views of Masculinity and Bullying: Clinical Work with Men Who were Bullied as Children
Abstract Bullying behavior and the impact of bullying behavior on children and adolescents has received considerable attention in empirical and clinical literature over the last two decades. Increasingly, empirical research is demonstrating that the psychological effects of being bullied persist into adulthood. There is less literature available that describes clinical processes with adults who were bullied as children. After reviewing the literature that discusses the long-term effects on adults of being victimized by bullies, and the literature that describes hegemonic views of masculinity, this paper gives a de...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - February 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Presence of Compassion in Therapy
Abstract The article examines the uniqueness of compassion as a healing element in current therapeutic processes. It aims to distinguish compassion from concepts such as pity, consolation, sympathy, and empathy, which have been attributed to it in the past. Despite their linkage, the emotional component in compassion is perceived as dominant in contrast to the applied cognitive ingredient in empathy. The essence of compassion in this article has been examined along three major directions: the definitions of compassion in therapy, in a concrete and applicable manner; the perception of compassion as an intersubj...
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - February 13, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Erratum to: Body Dissatisfaction and the Relevance of Religiosity: A Focus on Ultra-Orthodox Jews in a Community Study of Adult Women
(Source: Clinical Social Work Journal)
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal - February 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research