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Having the confidence to help
It’s a long way from Kenya to a primary school in the East Midlands, but for teaching assistant Hasmita Dhamelia it’s a journey that has reaped benefits for her and many around her. In a traditional terrace house in Leicester, her front room has a shrine to gods and figures from Hindu, Christian and Buddhist religious traditions, together with shelves of books that range from Oliver Twist through The Colour Purple to a collection of Italian recipes. And for our chat, Somali-style coffee with honey and ginger accompanies Jaffa Cakes. It’s all evidence of how in Hasmita’s life cultures cross-pollinate...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Magazine activists' learning East Midlands learning reps stars in our schools teaching assistants UNISON Learning Rep Source Type: news

Contaminants in food: Health risks of natural origin are frequently underestimated
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) Just under 60 percent of the German population view undesirable substances in food as a high or very high health risk. The most well-known of these substances, which are scientifically denoted as contaminants, are mercury compounds and dioxins. In contrast, only around 13 percent of respondents have heard of the natural contaminants pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) in honey or tea - and only roughly one in three of those who have heard of PAs believe these substances pose a significant health risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study confirms Bayer's neonic pesticides are destroying honeybee pollinators... yet the EPA does nothing
(Natural News) A new study affirmed that neonicotinoid pesticides — also known as “neonics” which are chemically related to nicotine — harm both honey bees and wild bees, as reported by BBC. Researchers found that the chemical exposure decreased the survival of honey bee hives during winter, while bumblebees and solitary bees produced fewer queens.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mad honey poisoning: a review - Gami R, Dhakal P.
Mad honey, which is different from normal commercial honey, is contaminated with grayanotoxins and causes intoxication. It is used as an alternative therapy for hypertension, peptic ulcer disease and is also being used more commonly for its aphrodisiac eff... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Second-degree burns after the application of a mustard-and-honey body wrap - Rita Gaiser M, K öhl H.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Have flowers devised the ultimate weapon of distraction?
(University of Portsmouth) Nectar, the high-energy 'honey' produced by flowers, might be a brilliant distraction technique to help protect a flower's reproductive parts, according to new research.Rather than merely providing a 'come-on' to bees and other insects to attract them to pollinate the flower, nectar could be playing a much more subtle and entrancing role. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Forget ‘the environment’: we need new words to convey life’s wonders | George Monbiot
Language is crucial to how we perceive the natural world. Help me to find better ways of describing nature and our relationships with it so we can better defend itIf Moses had promised the Israelites a land flowing with mammary secretions and insect vomit, would they have followed him into Canaan? Though this means milk and honey, I doubt it would have inspired them.Related:The word-hoard: Robert Macfarlane on rewilding our language of landscapeContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: George Monbiot Tags: Environment Language Animals Wildlife Science World news Source Type: news

Asian hornet to colonize UK within 2 decades without action
(University of Warwick) The yellow legged or Asian hornet -- a voracious predator of honey bees and other beneficial insects -- could rapidly colonize the UK unless its spread is combated, according to new research by the universities of Warwick and Newcastle, working with the National Bee Unit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ten reasons to call the pediatrician about a cough
Every child gets a cough from time to time; there’s really no escaping them. It’s completely normal for children to catch several colds a year, especially if they are in daycare or go to school, and common allergies can cause a cough too. Most of the time, it’s nothing to worry about. Most of the time, some rest, plenty of fluids, honey (for children over a year old) and some patience and TLC do the trick. But sometimes, it’s important to call the doctor. Here’s when you should worry about a cough: 1. Your child is having trouble breathing. Signs of this include: Breathing quickly “Suc...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 4, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Claire McCarthy Tags: Health & Wellness Claire McCarthy MD cough Source Type: news

Technology tracks 'bee talk' to help improve honey bee health
(Simon Fraser University) A Simon Fraser University researcher has devised a new bee monitoring system to better understand what more than 20,000 honeybees housed in hives in a local field are 'saying' to each other -- looking for clues about their health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rather sizeable fibroid and my recovery – Anne-Marie ’ s story
The post Rather sizeable fibroid and my recovery – Anne-Marie’s story appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. I underwent an abdominal hysterectomy on 14th June this year having had problems for the last two years due to a rather sizeable fibroid – everything was taken out with the exception of my ovaries. There seems to be very little information available generally with the exception of what is provided through the Hysterectomy Association and the forums and information they provide which have proven invaluable and very reassuring. I was really quite anxious in the days leading up to the operation &...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - July 25, 2017 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Tags: Your Stories fibroids manuka honey Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can you really use honey and cinnamon for weight loss?
Honey and cinnamon are often touted as natural weight loss solutions. How effective are they and what evidence is there to support their use? (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Symbiosis: Butter for my honey
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Textbooks tell us that, in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses, the host plant supplies its fungal symbionts solely with sugars, in return for inorganic nutrients. New findings by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers now show that lipids are also on the menu. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Health Tip: Eat Less Sugar
-- Too much sugar makes you gain weight and can harm your health. And you have to be especially careful about how much sugar you eat if you have diabetes. The American Heart Association advises: Not adding table sugar, syrup or honey to cereal,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Kingdom Honey for Her Contains Hidden Drug Ingredient
FDA advises consumers not to purchase or use Kingdom Honey for Her, a product promoted and sold for sexual enhancement. (Source: NCCAM Featured Content)
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - July 19, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: NCCIH Source Type: news

Royal Honey VIP Contains Hidden Drug Ingredient
FDA advises consumers not to purchase or use Royal Honey VIP, a product promoted and sold for sexual enhancement. (Source: NCCAM Featured Content)
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - July 19, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: NCCIH Source Type: news

Kingdom Honey for Him Contains Hidden Drug Ingredient
FDA advises consumers not to purchase or use Kingdom Honey for Him, a product promoted and sold for sexual enhancement. (Source: NCCAM Featured Content)
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - July 19, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: NCCIH Source Type: news

Humanity's chemical SUICIDE confirmed: Pesticides sprayed on food crops are wiping out food pollinators, leading toward a global food collapse
(Natural News) The next time you sit down to a delicious meal, consider the fact that bees are responsible for every third bite you eat. Honey bees take care of about 80 percent of all pollination, with just one bee colony pollinating upwards of 300 million flowers in a single day. In fact, 70 percent of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Manuka honey: Is it really a superfood?
Manuka honey has become highly popular, mainly because it's being called a superfood. Learn about the reported benefits, uses, and risks of Manuka honey. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Country-specific effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees and wild bees
Neonicotinoid seed dressings have caused concern world-wide. We use large field experiments to assess the effects of neonicotinoid-treated crops on three bee species across three countries (Hungary, Germany, and the United Kingdom). Winter-sown oilseed rape was grown commercially with either seed coatings containing neonicotinoids (clothianidin or thiamethoxam) or no seed treatment (control). For honey bees, we found both negative (Hungary and United Kingdom) and positive (Germany) effects during crop flowering. In Hungary, negative effects on honey bees (associated with clothianidin) persisted over winter and resulted in ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Woodcock, B. A., Bullock, J. M., Shore, R. F., Heard, M. S., Pereira, M. G., Redhead, J., Ridding, L., Dean, H., Sleep, D., Henrys, P., Peyton, J., Hulmes, S., Hulmes, L., Sarospataki, M., Saure, C., Edwards, M., Genersch, E., Knäbe, S., Pywell, R Tags: Ecology reports Source Type: news

Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids reduces honey bee health near corn crops
Experiments linking neonicotinoids and declining bee health have been criticized for not simulating realistic exposure. Here we quantified the duration and magnitude of neonicotinoid exposure in Canada’s corn-growing regions and used these data to design realistic experiments to investigate the effect of such insecticides on honey bees. Colonies near corn were naturally exposed to neonicotinoids for up to 4 months—the majority of the honey bee’s active season. Realistic experiments showed that neonicotinoids increased worker mortality and were associated with declines in social immunity and increased quee...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tsvetkov, N., Samson-Robert, O., Sood, K., Patel, H. S., Malena, D. A., Gajiwala, P. H., Maciukiewicz, P., Fournier, V., Zayed, A. Tags: Ecology reports Source Type: news

A study of the origin of chloramphenicol isomers in honey - Yanovych D, Berendsen B, Zasadna Z, Rydchuk M, Czymai T.
Due to the unexpected detection of chloramphenicol isomer residues in honey, we have studied the hypothesis of unauthorized or unintended use of unregistered veterinary drug preparations. First we have investigated honey samples in which a discrepancy was ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Probiotics found to protect honey bees from toxic effects of pesticides
(Natural News) Probiotics — the live bacteria found inside your gut — can be the answer to saving mankind. According to a recent study from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University, probiotics can protect honey bees from the fatal side effects of pesticides that people use to protect their crops. Honey bees play an important... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HONEY found to reduce arterial plaque by an astonishing 30%... could it prevent heart attacks?
(Natural News) Could honey be a natural way to prevent heart disease? That may just be the case. New research has found that a natural sugar found in honey, known as trehalose, can help to reduce the presence of arterial plaque by up to 30 percent. This natural sugar is also found in some other... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Honey vs. sugar: Is honey really better for you?
What are the benefits of honey and sugar compared to their disadvantages and risks? What are the similarities and differences between honey and sugar? (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Honey, I love you: our 40,000-year relationship with the humble bee
Humans have always had a special relationship with bees. And while the archaeological evidence is sparse, what does exist shows the richness of ancient human activitiesEarlier this month I received my first package of bees. A package refers to a box containing 3 pounds of bees, or roughly 12 thousandApis Melliforia. And while introducing a new species of animal to your home seems like a hugely cathartic event, there was no ceremonious exchange of insect between myself and the store from which I ordered them, which was a bit of a let down. I accepted the humming box, placed it in the hatchback of the family car, and drove h...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Holly Norton Tags: Science Archaeology Bees Environment Insects Source Type: news

Common pesticide damages honey bee's ability to fly
(University of California - San Diego) Biologists at UC San Diego have provided the first evidence that a widely used pesticide can significantly impair the ability of otherwise healthy honey bees to fly. The study, which employed a specially constructed bee 'flight mill,' raises concerns about how pesticides affect the honey bees' capacity to pollinate and long-term effects on the health of honey bee colonies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Making Mayo's Recipes: Honey sage carrots
You'll be fighting over this bowl of sweet sauteed carrots with fresh sage and honey. Watch how you can quickly embellish boiled carrots with fresh sage and honey. Each Thursday one of the 100+ tasty video recipes from the?Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program?is?featured on the Mayo Clinic News Network, just in time for you to [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 13, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

HONEY: Is this ancient medicinal food the key to fighting deadly drug-resistant infections?
(Natural News) Exotic honey can be used as a powerful alternative when treating one of the deadliest infections in the U.S. today. A report published in the International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents confirms that exotic honey can battle antibiotic-resistant infections, like Clostridium difficile. Interestingly, C.difficile is caused by an overdose of antibiotics. Two researchers from Elisabeth-TweeSteden Hospital’s Department... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: The cautions and benefits of honey
Does substituting honey for sugar make for a healthier diet? The answer depends on how much of the sticky sweetener you include in your day. In this Mayo Clinic Minute, dietitian Kate Zeratsky explains how, when used correctly, honey and other natural sweeteners can help your health. Jeff Olsen reports. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Meet The Woman Rescuing Millions of Honey Bees
Yesterday, the Trump White House placed the rusty patched bumble bee, one of America’s most important pollinators, on the endangered species list. It becomes the first bumble bee in the United States to receive federal protections. To make things clear, this wasn’t an act of genuine compassion from Donald Trump but the result of a lawsuit prompting the Federal government to take action. Bee populations have been on the decline for decades due to pesticides, loss of habitat, and climate change leaving environmentalists struggling to find a solution. Luckily, YouTuber and activist Rob Greenfield’s new video...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

At mealtime, honey bees prefer country blossoms to city blooms
Hungry honey bees appear to favor flowers in agricultural areas over those in neighboring urban areas. The discovery has implications for urban beekeepers and challenges assumptions that farmland and honey bees are incompatible, said authors of a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

At mealtime, honey bees prefer country blossoms to city blooms
(Ohio State University) Hungry honey bees appear to favor flowers in agricultural areas over those in neighboring urban areas. The discovery has implications for urban beekeepers and challenges assumptions that farmland and honey bees are incompatible, said authors of a new study from The Ohio State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Honey as a Potential Agent in Urinary Catheter Management Honey as a Potential Agent in Urinary Catheter Management
Could a low dilution of honey, which is well-established as a bactericide, significantly inhibit biofilm development on indwelling plastic devices such as urinary catheters?Journal of Clinical Pathology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Scientists reveal core genes involved in immunity of honey bees
A core set of genes involved in the responses of honey bees to multiple diseases caused by viruses and parasites has been identified by an international team of researchers. The findings provide a better-defined starting point for future studies of honey-bee health, and may help scientists and beekeepers breed honey bees that are more resilient to stress. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Honey bee genetics sheds light on bee origins
Where do honey bees come from? A new study clears some of the fog around honey bee origins. The work could be useful in breeding bees resistant to disease or pesticides. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Honey bee genetics sheds light on bee origins
(University of California - Davis) Where do honey bees come from? A new study from researchers at UC Davis and UC Berkeley clears some of the fog around honey bee origins. The work could be useful in breeding bees resistant to disease or pesticides. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Manuka honey kills more bacteria than all available antibiotics
(NaturalNews) Not all honey is created equal. While the benefits of raw, unprocessed honey have been well-documented over the centuries, Australian researchers have found one type of honey, called Manuka honey, to be better than all known antibiotics. Manuka honey is produced by bees that forage on the nectar of Leptospermum Scoparium, or New Zealand’s... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Honey bee teenagers speed up the aging process of their elders
In honey bee colonies, a single queen is laying eggs from which thousands of worker bees are born. At a young age, workers care for the brood, then build and defend the nest and eventually, towards the end of their lives, leave the safety of the nest to forage for food. This major step in their lives is speeding up ageing because searching the environment for food exposes these foragers to a wide range of stressors, such as pathogens, predators and adverse weather conditions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Egyptian Man Has One Honey Of A Bee Beard
Mohamed Hagras stands barechested as dozens of honeybees congregate around his face, eventually forming what he calls the “Beard of Bees.” To attract the insects he has a box housing their queen’s hormones strapped to his chin. The 31-year-old engineer-turned-beekeeper has been doing this for years both competitively ― he fondly recalls a Canadian model’s “Bikini of Bees” at a beekeeping event - and as an effort to educate Egyptians on the usefulness of bees. “The goal is to show that bees are not aggressive,” he told Reuters at his farm in Shibin El Kom, the capital of th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 2, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Could honey bee brood be the future of food?
Honey bee brood – the larvae and pupae of drones – has great potential as a food source. It is already eaten as a delicacy in many countries, including Mexico, Thailand and Australia. It has a nutty flavor with a crunchy texture when eaten cooked or dried, and is a versatile ingredient used in soups and egg dis hes. It also has high nutritional value, similar to beef in terms of protein quality and quantity, say researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New findings about the deformed wing virus, a major factor in honey bee colony mortality
In recent years, massive losses of honey bee colonies have occurred during winter in Europe and North America. It could be shown that the Varroa mite and the deformed wing virus are the main factors responsible for the alarming bee mortality. Researchers have succeeded for the first time in simulating the course of disease using artificial genetic material of the virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Manuka honey may be the future of antibacterial superbug medicine
(NaturalNews) Honey has been prized for centuries for its antibacterial and other medicinal properties, and in recent years, Manuka honey from New Zealand has become extremely popular due to its particularly impressive nutritional and health-boosting qualities.New research has... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Honey and water mixture may be a powerful weapon against hospital infections and deadly superbugs
(NaturalNews) Sometimes it's the simplest things that make all the difference for health, and researchers from the UK have confirmed just that with regards to urinary tract infections (UTI). A basic mixture of honey and water, they recently discovered, is a highly effective solution... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deadly infections from medical devices could be ended by using Manuka honey
(NaturalNews) Manuka honey is a unique and highly beneficial type of honey produced in Australia and New Zealand by bees that pollinate the Manuka bush, also known as tea tree. Recently touted as a superfood, Manuka honey has been used by indigenous cultures for thousands of years... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High number of pesticides within colonies linked to honey bee deaths
Honey bee colonies in the United States have been dying at high rates for over a decade, and agricultural pesticides -- including fungicides, herbicides and insecticides -- are often implicated as major culprits. Until now, most scientific studies have looked at pesticides one at a time, rather than investigating the effects of multiple real-world pesticide exposures within a colony. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Manuka honey curbs bacteria growth, Southampton study claims
Ryan MaassSOUTHAMPTON, England, Sept. 28 (UPI) -- Low dilutions of Manuka honey have the ability to deter bacterial growth, scientists from the University of Southampton claim in a new study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Honey'Could Reduce Catheter Infections'Honey'Could Reduce Catheter Infections '
Manuka honey could hold the key to keeping flexible tubes used in hospitals bug-free, says a UK study.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Manuka honey could stave off catheter-associated UTIs
Manuka honey shows promise for tackling catheter-associated urinary tract infections, after a study found it halted the formation of bacterial biofilms. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news