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Gut microbiota of larvae has an impact on mosquito's ability to transmit human pathogens
This study represents an important step toward a more comprehensive understanding of how the environment shapes the risk of vector-borne disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New species of parasitic wasp discovered in the eggs of leaf-rolling weevils in Africa
A new species of parasitic wasp has been obtained from the eggs of weevils associated with bushwillows in northeastern Gabon. Given the tiny insect is the first record of its genus for West-Central Africa, the researchers decided to assign the wasp a name to celebrate its origin. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New species of parasitic wasp discovered in the eggs of leaf-rolling weevils in Africa
(Pensoft Publishers) A new species of parasitic wasp has been obtained from the eggs of weevils associated with bushwillows in northeastern Gabon. Given the tiny insect is the first record of its genus for West-Central Africa, the researchers Dr. Stefania Laudonia and Dr. Gennaro Viggiani decided to assign the wasp a name to celebrate its origin. The scientists have published their findings in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cameroon: Bushmeat Trade Tests Ebola Prevention
[Al Jazeera] Ebolowa -The market in Ambam, a colonial town with brick-red cottages and rusty roofs, near the southern borders with Equatorial Guinea and Gabon, is a cluster of booth-sized shops and stalls. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 22, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Poachers Have All But Emptied This 'Sanctuary' Of Forest Elephants
Poachers in just a decade slaughtered roughly 25,000 forest elephants in Africa’s Minkébé National Park ― as much as 81 percent of the population in what has been an important sanctuary for the species, according to a new study. The park’s population of elephants fell by at least 78 percent from 2004 to 2014, according to Duke University researchers, who calculated the loss by comparing elephant dung surveys. The dramatic decline is a “startling warning that no place is safe from poaching,” the study’s authors wrote.  Minkébé, a remote, 2,900-square-mile pres...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Poaching drives 80 percent decline in elephants in key preserve
Forest elephant populations in one of Central Africa's largest sanctuaries have declined between 78% and 81% because of poaching, a new study finds. More than 25,000 elephants in Gabon's Mink ébé National Park may have been killed for their ivory between 2004 and 2014. With nearly half of Central Africa's forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of elephants from the park is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study reveals 'nightmare' for Central Africa's forest elephants
(Cell Press) Forest elephants living in an area that had been considered a sanctuary in the Central African country of Gabon are rapidly being picked off by illegal poachers, who are primarily coming from the bordering country of Cameroon. Researchers reporting in Current Biology on February 20 found that the forest elephant population in Gabon has dropped by more than 80 percent in a decade--a loss of about 25,000 elephants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Poaching drives 80 percent decline in elephants in key preserve
(Duke University) Forest elephant populations in one of Central Africa's largest sanctuaries have declined between 78% and 81% because of poaching, a new Duke-led study finds. More than 25,000 elephants in Gabon's Mink é b é National Park may have been killed for their ivory between 2004 and 2014. With nearly half of Central Africa's forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of elephants from the park is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bushmeat hunting drives biodiversity declines in Central Africa
Hunting has dramatically reduced the diversity of animal communities in forests near villages in Gabon and may also be driving declines in similar landscapes across 53% of Central Africa, report investigators. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bushmeat hunting drives biodiversity declines in Central Africa
(Duke University) Bushmeat hunting has dramatically reduced animal biodiversity in forests near rural villages in the Central African nation of Gabon, a new Duke University-led study finds. By extrapolating their results from Gabon across similar landscapes throughout Central Africa, the researchers conservatively estimate that degraded animal communities are likely now found across 53 percent of the region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 7, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Traveling To Southeast Asia? Here's What You Need To Know About Zika Virus
The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has infected potentially millions of people and is pegged as the cause of congenital Zika syndrome, a birth defect affecting thousands of children in the region. It can cause brain damage, seizures, deafness, blindness and other neurological and physiological problems.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued travel advisories for 59 countries and territories throughout the world, including neighborhoods in Miami where the Zika virus continues to spread locally. Most of these areas are in Latin America and the Caribbean, while eight...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Traveling To Southeast Asia? Here's What You Need To Know About Zika Virus
The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has infected potentially millions of people and is pegged as the cause of congenital Zika syndrome, a birth defect affecting thousands of children in the region. It can cause brain damage, seizures, deafness, blindness and other neurological and physiological problems.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued travel advisories for 59 countries and territories throughout the world, including neighborhoods in Miami where the Zika virus continues to spread locally. Most of these areas are in Latin America and the Caribbean, while eight...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What 1989 And The Golden Girls Tell Us About Medicine Today
Today, 1989 may be most associated with Taylor Swift: It is the album that won her a second Grammy for Album of the Year. Not only that, it happens to be the year Swift was born--such a long, long time ago! People under 35 have no personal memory of 1980s pop culture, which is ironic since Swift's album in part pays homage to it. In the real 1989 (no offense to Swift and the 10 co-producers who made the album), all sorts of revolutions took place: Mr. Gorbachev tore down that pesky wall, for example. America's greatest antagonist, the Soviet Union, collapsed in 1989. Brazil conducted its first democrat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: Red Cross volunteers on front lines of relief as clashes increase following Gabon elections
[IFRC] Violent protests continue in many towns in Gabon, including the capital, following the announcement Wednesday night of the results of the presidential election, which indicated the re-election of the incumbent. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 5, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Watch This ‘Ring of Fire’ Solar Eclipse Block the Sun Over Africa
A halo of sun shone above parts of Africa on Thursday as the moon glided between the sun and the Earth, causing an annular or “ring of fire” eclipse. Unlike a total solar eclipse where the moon completely blocks the sun’s light, an annular eclipse occurs when the moon partially blocks the sun, leaving a run of sunlight around the edges. Thursday’s eclipse could be seen from countries including the Republic of Congo, Gabon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Madagascar and Mozambique, according to NASA. This video shows the view from the village of Saint-Gilles on Réunion, an island o...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Africa Annular Solar Eclipse moon Partial Solar Eclipse Source Type: news

The September night sky
What to look out for during the month of the equinox, with a solar eclipse over Africa, followed by a lunar eclipseThe month of our autumnal equinox opens with an annular or “ring” solar eclipse on 1 September which is visible along a path that sweeps across Southern Central Africa from Gabon to Madagascar. The surrounding area, where a partial solar eclipse is seen, does not extend as far north as Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 28, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Alan Pickup Tags: Astronomy Solar eclipses Lunar eclipses Mars Saturn Mercury Science Space World news Source Type: news

Discovery of new strains of the HTLV-4 virus in hunters bitten by gorillas in Gabon
(Institut Pasteur) Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS have identified two new strains of the HTLV-4 virus in two hunters who were bitten by gorillas in Gabon. These findings, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, support the notion that gorillas represent a major source of infectious agents that can be passed on to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 13, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cameroon: Poultry Ban Hurting Farmers
[Deutsche Welle] Gabon and Equatorial Guinea have imposed ban on table birds from Cameroon due to the resurgence of the avian influenza virus. Poultry farmers say the ban has hugely affected their business. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 2, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Meet some amazing animals and plants that are new to science
Life on Earth can be found in the most surprising places, from the deep sea to pitch-black caves to just off the main road of a Gabonese National Park. Each year, about 18,000 species are discovered and described by scientists in thousands of academic publications, where regular folks may never... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 23, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

Meet Pharma’s Biggest Innovators
With projects submitted from Scotland to Togo, the 2016 eyeforpharma Barcelona Awards were truly a global occasion. Although we had wide participation from pharma’s top 20 (18 out of 20 to be exact, we’ll get the full set in 2017), UCB once again stood out from the pack. 2016 marked the second consecutive year in which they have taken home two awards; this time in the ‘Most Valuable Pharma Collaboration’ and ‘Customer Innovator’ categories. Many entrants had a strong technology component, with patient support and HCP education apps, tech-inspired hackathons, and the first social network ...
Source: EyeForPharma - March 23, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Thomas Disley Source Type: news

NASA, partner space agencies measure forests in Gabon
A contingent of NASA airborne instruments and scientists on the ground, including some from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, has joined colleagues from space agencies in Gabon and Europe this month to study the dense African tropical forests in Gabon. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What You Need to Know About the Zika Virus
The rapid spread of Zika virus through the Americas, together with the association of infection with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have propelled this previously ignored virus into the limelight. What is this virus and where did it come from? History Zika virus was first identified in 1947 in a sentinel monkey that was being used to monitor for the presence of yellow fever virus in the Zika Forest of Uganda. At this time, cell lines were not available for studying viruses, so serum from the febrile monkey was inoculated intracerebrally into mice. All the mice became sick, and the virus isolated from thei...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our Fate Tied to the Ocean's Fate
World leaders and the international community are gathering soon at the United Nations to adopt the Sustainable Development Goals, which will guide the UN and member states for the next 15 years. A critical component of achieving all the goals will be conservation and sustainable use of the world's ocean, seas, and marine resources -- Goal 14. This is good news. A healthy ocean is essential to ending poverty, drives prosperity, and ensures the health of our planet for generations to come. The ocean makes this planet habitable for human life. It generates half the oxygen we breathe and regulates our climate. Our fate is tie...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

How DNA Could Help Catch Elephant Poachers
Every year criminals around the world trade billions of dollars in products derived from wildlife. The elephant trade in particular has rankled government officials around the world with tens of thousands of the large mammals killed in Africa every year—a conservation threat, given the dwindling numbers of elephants in the wild. Now, scientists say that they may be able to use DNA from government seizes of illegal ivory tusks to trace elephants’ origins, a potentially groundbreaking method for law enforcement. Large-scale poaching, which accounts for more than 70% of the ivory trade, may be confined to just two...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - June 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals Source Type: news

Our Fate Is Tied to Our Ocean
It's not an exaggeration to say that we depend upon the ocean for our very existence. It regulates our climate and our weather. It generates half of the oxygen we breathe. It provides food and income for billions of people. Covering almost three-quarters of the planet, the mighty ocean is -- without a doubt -- a natural resource like no other. Our fate is inextricably tied to the ocean's fate and the ocean is in trouble. Many of the world's fish stocks are depleted and continue to be overfished. Runoff and debris are choking our waters. The very chemistry of the ocean is changing, becoming more acidic because of the carbo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Largest turtle breeding colony in the Atlantic discovered
A new study has revealed that the Central African country of Gabon is providing an invaluable nesting ground for a vulnerable species of sea turtle considered a regional conservation priority. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Plant genus named after Sir David Attenborough
Key taxonomical classification of rare plant with fleshy flowers discovered in the rainforest of Gabon in central Africa is named after British naturalist Grasshoppers, shrimps, spiders and other creatures have all been named after Sir David Attenborough, but now a whole genus of endangered plants will bear the naturalist’s name.Identified by a team of researchers in Gabon, a renowned botanical hotspot, the Sirdavidia flowering plants are believed to be the first plant genus – a taxonomical ranking one step above a species – named after the broadcaster. Related: Species named after Sir David Attenborough ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 5, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Adam Vaughan Tags: Wildlife Environment Plants Science David Attenborough Television & radio Biology Gabon Africa Endangered species Endangered habitats IUCN red list of endangered species Trees and forests Source Type: news

Scientists Ask If Ebola Could Be Silently Immunizing Some People While Killing Others
By Kate Kelland and Emma Farge LONDON/DAKAR (Reuters) - A recent sharp drop in new Ebola infections in West Africa is prompting scientists to wonder whether the virus may be silently immunizing some people at the same time as brutally killing their neighbors. So-called "asymptomatic" Ebola cases - in which someone is exposed to the virus, develops antibodies, but doesn't get sick or suffer symptoms - are hotly disputed among scientists, with some saying their existence is little more than a pipe dream. Yet if, as some studies suggest, such cases do occur in epidemics of the deadly disease, th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Shedding new light on diet of extinct animals
A study of tooth enamel in mammals living today in the equatorial forest of Gabon could ultimately shed light on the diet of long extinct animals, according to new research. The researchers found that magnesium isotopes are particularly well suited to deciphering the diet of living mammals and, when used in conjunction with other methods such as carbon isotopes, they could open up new perspectives on the study of fossilized animals. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Shedding new light on the diet of extinct animals
A study of tooth enamel in mammals living today in the equatorial forest of Gabon could ultimately shed light on the diet of long extinct animals, according to new research from the University of Bristol. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 22, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, International; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Shedding new light on the diet of extinct animals
(University of Bristol) A study of tooth enamel in mammals living today in the equatorial forest of Gabon could ultimately shed light on the diet of long extinct animals, according to new research from the University of Bristol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 22, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Africa: Thirteen Countries Move Closer to Eradicating Hunger
[FAO]Rome -FAO honors achievements of Brazil, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Gabon, the Gambia, Iran, Kiribati, Malaysia, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, the Philippines and Uruguay (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 1, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

South Africa Turns To New Breed Of Anti-Poaching Crime Fighters
RUSTENBURG, South Africa (AP) — Venom and Killer. These are members of a furry breed of anti-poaching operatives, dogs that can detect a whiff of hidden rhino horn in a suspect's vehicle or follow the spoor of armed poachers in South Africa's besieged wildlife parks. Dogs are a small part of an increasingly desperate struggle to curb poaching in Africa, where tens of thousands of elephants have been slaughtered in recent years to meet a surging appetite for ivory in Asia, primarily China. In South Africa, poachers have killed more than 1,000 rhinos this year, surpassing the 2013 record. Countries and conservat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 29, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Canadian Ebola vaccine to be tested in Europe, Gabon, Kenya
LONDON (Reuters) - Trials of an experimental vaccine developed by the Canadian government and licensed to NewLink Genetics will begin swiftly in healthy volunteers in Europe, Gabon and Kenya, under a program with funding from the Wellcome Trust. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

ANH-Intl Feature: Musings on Ebola – a case for immune-modulation therapy
ANH-Intl’s Rob Verkerk argues for a concerted effort on immune support to help stem West Africa’s Ebola epidemic (Source: Alliance for Natural Health)
Source: Alliance for Natural Health - October 15, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Sophie Tags: CDC Centres for Disease Control collared bat drugs ebola epidemic europe Gabon GlaxoSmithKline GSK Guinea hammer-headed fruit bat Hypsignathus monstrosus immune international Liberia Myonycteris torquata selenium Sierra Source Type: news

WHO Director-General addresses high-level meeting on the Ebola response
Good morning, Excellencies, Thank you for giving us your time, your expertise, and your support to get a grip on this epidemic and turn it around. (Source: WHO Director-General speeches)
Source: WHO Director-General speeches - September 25, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, African Region [region], Gabon [country], Speech [doctype] Source Type: news

Africa: Ebola - Relief for Nigeria, As AU Moves Against Travel Bans
[Guardian]THE African Union (AU) has urged member states to lift all travel bans and restrictions related to the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak. This came as some African countries, the latest being Gabon, continue to embarrass Nigeria with travel bans over the Ebola virus. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 15, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Polio: Mutated virus breaches vaccine protection
(University of Bonn) Thanks to effective vaccination, polio is considered nearly eradicated. Each year only a few hundred people are stricken worldwide. However, scientists of the University of Bonn, together with colleagues from Gabon, are reporting alarming findings: a mutated virus that was able to resist the vaccine protection to a considerable extent was found in victims of an outbreak in the Congo in 2010. The pathogen could also potentially have infected many people in Germany. The results appear now in the magazine PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 21, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tropical countries' growing wealth may aid conservation
(Duke University) Attainment of upper middle income in Brazil, Costa Rica, Mexico, Gabon, Malaysia, Peru and Thailand -- nations that contain nearly 80 percent of the world's primary tropical forests -- may shift the financial burden for tropical forest conservation. Rising public opinion and donations to conservation causes provide '...strong evidence that as countries reach upper-middle-income status, support for conservation and willingness to pay for it grows ..." (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Oldest biodiversity found in Gabonese marine ecosystem
Researchers have discovered, in clay sediments from Gabon, fossils of the oldest multicellular organisms ever found. In total, more than 400 fossils dating back 2.1 billion years have been collected, including dozens of new types. The detailed analysis of these finds reveals a broad biodiversity composed of micro and macroscopic organisms of highly varied size and shape that evolved in a marine ecosystem. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 26, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nearly One-Third of World’s Population Is Overweight
Schools around the world, like this one in Melilla, Uruguay, are trying to introduce healthy eating habits to bring down rates of obesity and overweight. Credit: Victoria Rodríguez/IPSBy Farangis AbdurazokzodaWASHINGTON , May 31 2014 (IPS) Over two billion people – or 30 percent of the world’s population – are either obese or overweight, and no country has successfully reduced obesity rates to date, according to a new study published this week by the British medical journal, The Lancet. The number of overweight and obese people increased from 857 million in 1980 to 2.1 billion in 2013, according to...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 31, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Farangis Abdurazokzoda Tags: Development & Aid Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Population Poverty & MDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations World Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Body Mass Index Michelle Obama obesity Overweight The Source Type: news

Morocco: HM the King and Gabonese Pres. Visit Agondjé University Hospital Center in Libreville
[MAP]Libreville -HM King Mohammed VI and Gabonese president Ali Bongo Ondimba visited, on Thursday, the Agondjé University Hospital Center (CHU) in Libreville. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 7, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Morocco: HM the King and Gabonese Pres. Visit Libreville Cancer Treatment Institute of Agondjé University Hospital Center
[MAP]Libreville -HM King Mohammed VI and Gabonese president Ali Bongo Ondimba visited, on Thursday, the Libreville Cancer Treatment Institute, located at the Agondjé University Hospital Center (CHU), north of the Gabonese capital. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 7, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Birds' migration secrets to be revealed by space tracker
Icarus, a wildlife receiver circling above Earth, will monitor the epic journeys of tiny birds and insects, helping to warn us of volcanic eruptions and to protect us from diseasesSmall birds, butterflies, bees and fruitbats will be fitted with tiny radio transmitters and tracked throughout their lifetimes from space when a dedicated wildlife radio receiver is fitted to the International Space Station next year.The ability to follow the movements of very small organisms hour by hour from space will revolutionise our understanding of long-distance bird migrations, and give advance warnings of volcanic eruptions and earthqua...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2014 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Bird flu World news Health Society Birds Animals International Space Station Insects The Observer Environment Science Wildlife Source Type: news

Starwatch: The November night sky
One month away from Comet ISON's Sun-grazing perihelion on 28 November, it is still anyone's guess as to whether it will flourish or flop. Meanwhile, Jupiter is now our brightest non-lunar object for much of the night.Venus, brilliant at mag -4.4 to -4.6, stands low in the SSW at sunset, though its altitude improves from about 7° to 11° as it turns northwards again and by the 30th it sets later than 18:30. Look for it 8° below-left of the young Moon on the 6th when it stands further S against the stars than it has been since 1930.Jupiter, mag -2.4 to -2.6, sits below and right of Castor and Pollux in Gemini. Ri...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 28, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Alan Pickup Tags: The Guardian Astronomy Comets Features Science Space Source Type: news

New consortium to advance first-ever clinical testing of human hookworm vaccine in Gabon
(Sabin Vaccine Institute) The HOOKVAC consortium, led by the Academic Medical Center, has been awarded a grant of six million Euros from the European Commission FP7 programme to expand the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership's work to develop and test a vaccine for human hookworm, which infects 600-700 million of the world's poorest people. Under this grant, the HOOKVAC consortium will begin the first clinical testing of the human hookworm vaccine in Gabon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 26, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Element of the week: einsteinium | video | @GrrlScientist
What do Ivy Mike, plutonium and Gabon, Africa share in common?This week, we meet the element einsteinium, which has the atomic symbol Es and the atomic number 99. The atomic symbol was originally E but was later changed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) to conform to their new rule that all newly named elements must have symbols with two letters. The inspiration for this element's name should be obvious.Einsteinium is a soft silvery-white metal that is radioactive. The resulting radio-decay is accompanied by both heat and light (see right). It was first identified in the aftermath of the Ivy ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2013 Category: Science Authors: GrrlScientist Tags: theguardian.com Blogposts Chemistry Science Source Type: news

Africa: Yvonne Chaka Chaka: Why We Need to Back the Global Fund Now
[Global Fund]We were coming home from a musical festival in Gabon when a musician from my group felt unwell and was driven home to rest. No one detected that her malaise was a malaria infection. By the time Phumzile Ntuli was taken to the hospital in South Africa, she had developed cerebral malaria. To my greatest shock and dismay, she fell into a coma and died shortly after. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - April 10, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

11,000 elephants slaughtered in national park once home to Africa’s largest forest elephant population
The Wildlife Conservation Society has just announced that a national park, once home to Africa’s largest forest elephant population, has lost a staggering 11,100 individuals due to poaching for the ivory trade. The shocking figures come from Gabon's Minkebe Park, where recent surveys of areas within the park revealed that two thirds of its elephants have vanished since 2004. The majority of these losses have probably taken place in the last five years. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 6, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news

Plants help dispose of toxic threat
This article appeared in Guardian Weekly, which incorporates material from Le Monde PlantsChemistryPollutionPierre Le Hirguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 5, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Pierre Le Hir Tags: News Plants Guardian Weekly Science Source Type: news