Niger: Digital Press Briefing with U.S. Representative to the United Nations, Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield
[State Department] Digital press briefing with U.S. Representative to the United Nations, Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield. Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield discussed her trip to Mali, Niger, and Gabon. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 30, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Forest elephants are now critically endangered -- here's how to count them
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A team of scientists led by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and working closely with experts from the Agence Nationale des Parcs Nationaux du Gabon (ANPN) compared methodologies to count African forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis), which were recently acknowledged by IUCN as a separate, Critically Endangered species from African savannah elephants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Inside Ibogaine, One of the Most Promising and Perilous Psychedelics for Addiction
Amber Capone had become afraid of her husband. The “laid-back, bigger than life and cooler than cool” man she’d married had become isolated, disconnected and despondent during his 13 years as a U.S. Navy SEAL. Typically, he was gone 300 days of the year, but when he was home, Amber and their two children walked on eggshells around him. “Everyone was just playing nice until he left again,” Amber says. In 2013, Marcus retired from the military. But life as a civilian only made his depression, anger, headaches, anxiety, alcoholism, impulsivity and violent dreams worse. Sometimes he’d get up...
Source: TIME: Health - April 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized Drugs feature Magazine Mental Health Source Type: news

Long-term collapse in fruit availability threatens Central African forest megafauna
Afrotropical forests host much of the world’s remaining megafauna, although these animals are confined to areas where direct human influences are low. We used a rare long-term dataset of tree reproduction and a photographic database of forest elephants to assess food availability and body condition of an emblematic megafauna species at Lopé National Park, Gabon. Our analysis reveals an 81% decline in fruiting over a 32-year period (1986–2018) and an 11% decline in body condition of fruit-dependent forest elephants from 2008 to 2018. Fruit famine in one of the last strongholds for African forest elephants...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Bush, E. R., Whytock, R. C., Bahaa-el-din, L., Bourgeois, S., Bunnefeld, N., Cardoso, A. W., Dikangadissi, J. T., Dimbonda, P., Dimoto, E., Edzang Ndong, J., Jeffery, K. J., Lehmann, D., Makaga, L., Momboua, B., Momont, L. R. W., Tutin, C. E. G., White, L Tags: Ecology reports Source Type: news

Gambia/Gabon: GFF Responds to Gabon Delegation Claims
[The Point] The President of The Gambia Football Federation (GFF), Lamin Kaba Bajo, has strongly responded to allegations made by the Gabonese football delegation which attracted massive international media attention as most of which only relied on Arsenal and Gabon captain, Pierre Emerick Aubameyang's version on social media. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 21, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Stirling experts lead research into impact of climate change on rainforest elephants
(University of Stirling) Experts from the University of Stirling, working closely with the Government of Gabon, have led an international study into the impact of climate change on Central Africa's rainforests and the threat posed to elephant populations in the region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Building Back Greener in Africa
By Umberto LabateISTANBUL, Jul 7 2020 (IPS) COVID-19 continues to race across the African continent. People are dying, and even more are being pushed into hunger and poverty, in many cases risking to overturn years of development gains. The numbers are staggering. While the pandemic is only now taking root in Africa, there are at least 400,000 confirmed cases, and according to the World Health Organization (WHO), the outbreak is accelerating across the continent. Add to this the risks of hunger and poverty. Three out of four people on the continent are food insecure. More than 320 million people are without access to saf...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Umberto Labate Tags: Africa Climate Change Development & Aid Economy & Trade Financial Crisis Food & Agriculture Green Economy Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Yellow fever – Gabon
On 15 April 2020, WHO received information regarding a confirmed case of yellow fever in Magandi village, Tchibanga city in Nyanga Province of southern Gabon, 590 km from the capital, Libreville. The case is an 83-year-old male with no known vaccination history for yellow fever. He had onset of symptoms on 30 January 2020 and presented to a health facility on 2 February 2020 with abdominal pain and jaundice. Between 2 February and 9 April, he consulted the Urban Health Centre in Tchibanga, the Christian Alliance Hospital in Bongolo and the University hospital in the capital Libreville where the case received anti-malarial ...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - June 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Africa: Despite the Pandemic, Frontline Nations Push Ahead On Stronger Climate Plans
[Thomson Reuters Foundation] Countries from Jamaica to Kenya and Gabon "know how vital this process is" of boosting national action to meet global climate goals (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 7, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 & Human Health Risks Linked to Wildlife Trade Practices
An animal market in Indonesia. Credit: TRAFFICBy Steven BroadCAMBRIDGE, UK, May 7 2020 (IPS) At the time of writing, the COVID-19 pandemic is raging worldwide, causing human mortality and socio-economic disruption on a massive scale and it appears highly likely that profound impacts will continue for many years to come. Although the precise origins of the disease remain unproven, there are strong indications of a wild animal source and a direct link to wildlife trade in China. Even if evidence points elsewhere in future, the magnitude of the current outbreak places under an intense spotlight concerns raised by zoonotic d...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Steven Broad Tags: Civil Society Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Gabon: Govt Puts Libreville Under Lockdown as COVID-19 Cases Swell
[Nation] The Gabonese capital, Libreville, will be put under lockdown for 15 days effective from April 12 and "will be renewed if need be" as part of a raft of measures to curb spread of the coronavirus, Covid-19 pandemic in the country, the government announced Friday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 13, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Gabon: Fresh Questions Over Bongo's Fitness to Rule After UK Medical Trip
[RFI] Libreville has denied reports that President Ali Bongo Ondimba, who suffered a stroke last October while visiting Saudi Arabia, was in a London hospital in "worsening condition". (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 4, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Ancient rock wiggles could be earliest trace of moving organism
Scientists say 2.1bn-year-old fossils may show evidence of self-propelled motionA collection of short wiggly structures discovered in ancient rocks could be the earliest fossilised traces of organisms able to move themselves, scientists say.If scientists are correct, the 2.1bn-year-old structures point to an earlier origin than generally thought for eukaryotes – cells with a membrane-bound nucleus and which make up plants, animals and fungi – previouslybelieved to have first emerged about 1.8bn years ago. It also pushes back the earliest evidence of self-propelled movement of eukaryotes by 1.5bn years – s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Fossils Science Biology Evolution Gabon Africa Source Type: news

Gabon: Video of Ailing President Raises More Questions Than Answers
[RFI] Gabon's President Ali Bongo has for the first time, since his hospitalisation in Saudi Arabia last month, appeared in two videos filmed in Rabat where he is continuing treatment for an unknown illness. Bongo met with Moroccan King Mohammed VI as well as top government officials. However, his appearance continues to raise questions about the state of his health. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 6, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Africa:Health and Environment - Shaping a Better Future Together in Africa
[WHO] Libreville, 5 November 2018 - Aiming to identify emerging environmental threats to people's health and agree on a strategic action plan for the region, African Ministers of health and environment will meet for the Third Interministerial Conference on Health and Environment from 6 to 9 November in Libreville, Gabon. The conference jointly organized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UN Environment will discuss how to turn health and environmental policies into action. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 5, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among teens and adults in Gabon remains high
(PLOS) A study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, by Mirdad Kazanji, of the Centre International de Recherches Medicales de Franceville in Gabon, and the Institut Pasteur de la Guyane in French Guiana, suggests that 30 years after the first epidemiological survey of the seroprevalence of Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infections in Gabon, the country remains highly endemic, with a seroprevalence of 7.3 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 25, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Artist paints the stomach-churning inch-long parasitic worms that were living in his eyeballs  
Ben Taylor, an Australian-born painter who now resides in the UK, was infected with  Loa loa filariasis after a visit to rural Gabon, central Africa, in 2013. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gabon Accuses France's Veolia of Polluting Amid Concession Dispute Gabon Accuses France's Veolia of Polluting Amid Concession Dispute
Gabon accused French environmental services group Veolia on Tuesday of widespread pollution at SEEG, the power and water utility it operates there, amid a growing dispute over the company's concession.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Orange cave crocodiles may be mutating into new species
In 2008 an archaeologist discovered crocodiles living in remote caves in Gabon. Now, genetics hint that these weird cave crocodilians may be in the process of evolving into a new species.It sounds like something out of a children ’s book: it’s orange, it dwells in a cave and it lives on bats and crickets. But this isn’t some fairy story about a lonely troll – it’s the much weirder tale of a group of African dwarf crocodiles that are adapting to life in pitch-darkness.“We could say that we have a mutating species, because [the cave crocodile] already has a different [genetic] haplotype,&r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeremy Hance Tags: Environment Gabon Africa World news Biology Evolution Science Animal behaviour Animals Endangered species Conservation Wildlife Source Type: news

West Africa:Militants in Lake Chad Region Block Polio Program
[VOA] Scientists warn a campaign to eradicate polio in central Africa is falling short because of upheaval in the Lake Chad Basin area, where the Boko Haram militant group remains active. On the positive side, on country -- Gabon - has been declared polio-free. (Source: AllAfrica News: Polio)
Source: AllAfrica News: Polio - December 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gut microbiota of larvae has an impact on mosquito's ability to transmit human pathogens
This study represents an important step toward a more comprehensive understanding of how the environment shapes the risk of vector-borne disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New species of parasitic wasp discovered in the eggs of leaf-rolling weevils in Africa
A new species of parasitic wasp has been obtained from the eggs of weevils associated with bushwillows in northeastern Gabon. Given the tiny insect is the first record of its genus for West-Central Africa, the researchers decided to assign the wasp a name to celebrate its origin. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New species of parasitic wasp discovered in the eggs of leaf-rolling weevils in Africa
(Pensoft Publishers) A new species of parasitic wasp has been obtained from the eggs of weevils associated with bushwillows in northeastern Gabon. Given the tiny insect is the first record of its genus for West-Central Africa, the researchers Dr. Stefania Laudonia and Dr. Gennaro Viggiani decided to assign the wasp a name to celebrate its origin. The scientists have published their findings in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cameroon: Bushmeat Trade Tests Ebola Prevention
[Al Jazeera] Ebolowa -The market in Ambam, a colonial town with brick-red cottages and rusty roofs, near the southern borders with Equatorial Guinea and Gabon, is a cluster of booth-sized shops and stalls. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 22, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Poachers Have All But Emptied This 'Sanctuary' Of Forest Elephants
Poachers in just a decade slaughtered roughly 25,000 forest elephants in Africa’s Minkébé National Park ― as much as 81 percent of the population in what has been an important sanctuary for the species, according to a new study. The park’s population of elephants fell by at least 78 percent from 2004 to 2014, according to Duke University researchers, who calculated the loss by comparing elephant dung surveys. The dramatic decline is a “startling warning that no place is safe from poaching,” the study’s authors wrote.  Minkébé, a remote, 2,900-square-mile pres...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Poaching drives 80 percent decline in elephants in key preserve
Forest elephant populations in one of Central Africa's largest sanctuaries have declined between 78% and 81% because of poaching, a new study finds. More than 25,000 elephants in Gabon's Mink ébé National Park may have been killed for their ivory between 2004 and 2014. With nearly half of Central Africa's forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of elephants from the park is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 20, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Poaching drives 80 percent decline in elephants in key preserve
(Duke University) Forest elephant populations in one of Central Africa's largest sanctuaries have declined between 78% and 81% because of poaching, a new Duke-led study finds. More than 25,000 elephants in Gabon's Mink é b é National Park may have been killed for their ivory between 2004 and 2014. With nearly half of Central Africa's forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of elephants from the park is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study reveals 'nightmare' for Central Africa's forest elephants
(Cell Press) Forest elephants living in an area that had been considered a sanctuary in the Central African country of Gabon are rapidly being picked off by illegal poachers, who are primarily coming from the bordering country of Cameroon. Researchers reporting in Current Biology on February 20 found that the forest elephant population in Gabon has dropped by more than 80 percent in a decade--a loss of about 25,000 elephants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bushmeat hunting drives biodiversity declines in Central Africa
Hunting has dramatically reduced the diversity of animal communities in forests near villages in Gabon and may also be driving declines in similar landscapes across 53% of Central Africa, report investigators. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bushmeat hunting drives biodiversity declines in Central Africa
(Duke University) Bushmeat hunting has dramatically reduced animal biodiversity in forests near rural villages in the Central African nation of Gabon, a new Duke University-led study finds. By extrapolating their results from Gabon across similar landscapes throughout Central Africa, the researchers conservatively estimate that degraded animal communities are likely now found across 53 percent of the region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 7, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Traveling To Southeast Asia? Here's What You Need To Know About Zika Virus
The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has infected potentially millions of people and is pegged as the cause of congenital Zika syndrome, a birth defect affecting thousands of children in the region. It can cause brain damage, seizures, deafness, blindness and other neurological and physiological problems.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued travel advisories for 59 countries and territories throughout the world, including neighborhoods in Miami where the Zika virus continues to spread locally. Most of these areas are in Latin America and the Caribbean, while eight...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Traveling To Southeast Asia? Here's What You Need To Know About Zika Virus
The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has infected potentially millions of people and is pegged as the cause of congenital Zika syndrome, a birth defect affecting thousands of children in the region. It can cause brain damage, seizures, deafness, blindness and other neurological and physiological problems.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued travel advisories for 59 countries and territories throughout the world, including neighborhoods in Miami where the Zika virus continues to spread locally. Most of these areas are in Latin America and the Caribbean, while eight...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What 1989 And The Golden Girls Tell Us About Medicine Today
Today, 1989 may be most associated with Taylor Swift: It is the album that won her a second Grammy for Album of the Year. Not only that, it happens to be the year Swift was born--such a long, long time ago! People under 35 have no personal memory of 1980s pop culture, which is ironic since Swift's album in part pays homage to it. In the real 1989 (no offense to Swift and the 10 co-producers who made the album), all sorts of revolutions took place: Mr. Gorbachev tore down that pesky wall, for example. America's greatest antagonist, the Soviet Union, collapsed in 1989. Brazil conducted its first democrat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: Red Cross volunteers on front lines of relief as clashes increase following Gabon elections
[IFRC] Violent protests continue in many towns in Gabon, including the capital, following the announcement Wednesday night of the results of the presidential election, which indicated the re-election of the incumbent. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 5, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Watch This ‘Ring of Fire’ Solar Eclipse Block the Sun Over Africa
A halo of sun shone above parts of Africa on Thursday as the moon glided between the sun and the Earth, causing an annular or “ring of fire” eclipse. Unlike a total solar eclipse where the moon completely blocks the sun’s light, an annular eclipse occurs when the moon partially blocks the sun, leaving a run of sunlight around the edges. Thursday’s eclipse could be seen from countries including the Republic of Congo, Gabon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Madagascar and Mozambique, according to NASA. This video shows the view from the village of Saint-Gilles on Réunion, an island o...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Africa Annular Solar Eclipse moon Partial Solar Eclipse Source Type: news

The September night sky
What to look out for during the month of the equinox, with a solar eclipse over Africa, followed by a lunar eclipseThe month of our autumnal equinox opens with an annular or “ring” solar eclipse on 1 September which is visible along a path that sweeps across Southern Central Africa from Gabon to Madagascar. The surrounding area, where a partial solar eclipse is seen, does not extend as far north as Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 28, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Alan Pickup Tags: Astronomy Solar eclipses Lunar eclipses Mars Saturn Mercury Science Space World news Source Type: news

Discovery of new strains of the HTLV-4 virus in hunters bitten by gorillas in Gabon
(Institut Pasteur) Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS have identified two new strains of the HTLV-4 virus in two hunters who were bitten by gorillas in Gabon. These findings, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, support the notion that gorillas represent a major source of infectious agents that can be passed on to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 13, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cameroon: Poultry Ban Hurting Farmers
[Deutsche Welle] Gabon and Equatorial Guinea have imposed ban on table birds from Cameroon due to the resurgence of the avian influenza virus. Poultry farmers say the ban has hugely affected their business. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 2, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Meet some amazing animals and plants that are new to science
Life on Earth can be found in the most surprising places, from the deep sea to pitch-black caves to just off the main road of a Gabonese National Park. Each year, about 18,000 species are discovered and described by scientists in thousands of academic publications, where regular folks may never... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 23, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

Meet Pharma’s Biggest Innovators
With projects submitted from Scotland to Togo, the 2016 eyeforpharma Barcelona Awards were truly a global occasion. Although we had wide participation from pharma’s top 20 (18 out of 20 to be exact, we’ll get the full set in 2017), UCB once again stood out from the pack. 2016 marked the second consecutive year in which they have taken home two awards; this time in the ‘Most Valuable Pharma Collaboration’ and ‘Customer Innovator’ categories. Many entrants had a strong technology component, with patient support and HCP education apps, tech-inspired hackathons, and the first social network ...
Source: EyeForPharma - March 23, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Thomas Disley Source Type: news

NASA, partner space agencies measure forests in Gabon
A contingent of NASA airborne instruments and scientists on the ground, including some from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, has joined colleagues from space agencies in Gabon and Europe this month to study the dense African tropical forests in Gabon. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What You Need to Know About the Zika Virus
The rapid spread of Zika virus through the Americas, together with the association of infection with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have propelled this previously ignored virus into the limelight. What is this virus and where did it come from? History Zika virus was first identified in 1947 in a sentinel monkey that was being used to monitor for the presence of yellow fever virus in the Zika Forest of Uganda. At this time, cell lines were not available for studying viruses, so serum from the febrile monkey was inoculated intracerebrally into mice. All the mice became sick, and the virus isolated from thei...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our Fate Tied to the Ocean's Fate
World leaders and the international community are gathering soon at the United Nations to adopt the Sustainable Development Goals, which will guide the UN and member states for the next 15 years. A critical component of achieving all the goals will be conservation and sustainable use of the world's ocean, seas, and marine resources -- Goal 14. This is good news. A healthy ocean is essential to ending poverty, drives prosperity, and ensures the health of our planet for generations to come. The ocean makes this planet habitable for human life. It generates half the oxygen we breathe and regulates our climate. Our fate is tie...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

How DNA Could Help Catch Elephant Poachers
Every year criminals around the world trade billions of dollars in products derived from wildlife. The elephant trade in particular has rankled government officials around the world with tens of thousands of the large mammals killed in Africa every year—a conservation threat, given the dwindling numbers of elephants in the wild. Now, scientists say that they may be able to use DNA from government seizes of illegal ivory tusks to trace elephants’ origins, a potentially groundbreaking method for law enforcement. Large-scale poaching, which accounts for more than 70% of the ivory trade, may be confined to just two...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - June 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals Source Type: news

Our Fate Is Tied to Our Ocean
It's not an exaggeration to say that we depend upon the ocean for our very existence. It regulates our climate and our weather. It generates half of the oxygen we breathe. It provides food and income for billions of people. Covering almost three-quarters of the planet, the mighty ocean is -- without a doubt -- a natural resource like no other. Our fate is inextricably tied to the ocean's fate and the ocean is in trouble. Many of the world's fish stocks are depleted and continue to be overfished. Runoff and debris are choking our waters. The very chemistry of the ocean is changing, becoming more acidic because of the carbo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Largest turtle breeding colony in the Atlantic discovered
A new study has revealed that the Central African country of Gabon is providing an invaluable nesting ground for a vulnerable species of sea turtle considered a regional conservation priority. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Plant genus named after Sir David Attenborough
Key taxonomical classification of rare plant with fleshy flowers discovered in the rainforest of Gabon in central Africa is named after British naturalist Grasshoppers, shrimps, spiders and other creatures have all been named after Sir David Attenborough, but now a whole genus of endangered plants will bear the naturalist’s name.Identified by a team of researchers in Gabon, a renowned botanical hotspot, the Sirdavidia flowering plants are believed to be the first plant genus – a taxonomical ranking one step above a species – named after the broadcaster. Related: Species named after Sir David Attenborough ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 5, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Adam Vaughan Tags: Wildlife Environment Plants Science David Attenborough Television & radio Biology Gabon Africa Endangered species Endangered habitats IUCN red list of endangered species Trees and forests Source Type: news

Scientists Ask If Ebola Could Be Silently Immunizing Some People While Killing Others
By Kate Kelland and Emma Farge LONDON/DAKAR (Reuters) - A recent sharp drop in new Ebola infections in West Africa is prompting scientists to wonder whether the virus may be silently immunizing some people at the same time as brutally killing their neighbors. So-called "asymptomatic" Ebola cases - in which someone is exposed to the virus, develops antibodies, but doesn't get sick or suffer symptoms - are hotly disputed among scientists, with some saying their existence is little more than a pipe dream. Yet if, as some studies suggest, such cases do occur in epidemics of the deadly disease, th...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Shedding new light on diet of extinct animals
A study of tooth enamel in mammals living today in the equatorial forest of Gabon could ultimately shed light on the diet of long extinct animals, according to new research. The researchers found that magnesium isotopes are particularly well suited to deciphering the diet of living mammals and, when used in conjunction with other methods such as carbon isotopes, they could open up new perspectives on the study of fossilized animals. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Shedding new light on the diet of extinct animals
A study of tooth enamel in mammals living today in the equatorial forest of Gabon could ultimately shed light on the diet of long extinct animals, according to new research from the University of Bristol. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 22, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, International; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news