East African Environmental Activist Wins Major Prize
By Lisa VivesNEW YORK, Apr 22 2015 (IPS)On Earth Day, Apr. 22, Kenyan activist Phyllis Omido takes the stage in Washington DC to receive the Goldman Environmental Prize for her efforts to defend her community from lead poisoning and force the closure of a lead smelting plant that was emitting fumes and spewing untreated acid wastewater into streams, poisoning the neighbourhood – including her own baby.Courtesy of the Goldman Prize.“At first we thought he had malaria or typhoid, but doctors found he was suffering from lead poisoning,” Omido recalled. The lead was traced to a smelter where Phyllis had recen...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Lisa Vives Tags: Active Citizens Africa Civil Society Environment Headlines Health Newsbrief TerraViva United Nations Goldman Environmental Prize Phyllis Omido Source Type: news

UK drew wrong conclusion from its neonicotinoids study, scientist says
Reanalysis of a Food and Environment Agency study may provide first conclusive evidence that neonicotinoids pesticides are a key factor in bee decline, despite it originally being used to support the opposite view Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 26, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Karl Mathiesen Tags: Bees Pesticides Environment Farming Insects Wildlife UK news Science Source Type: news

Florida Reportedly Bans Environment Officials From Mentioning Climate Change
Underscoring the divisiveness of climate change in American politics, government officials at Florida’s main environment agency have reportedly been asked to refrain from mentioning it. Officials from the state’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) were given an unwritten order not to use the words climate change or global warming in any official communication or reports, the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting (FCIR) claimed on Sunday. “We were told not to use the terms climate change, global warming or sustainability,” Christopher Byrd, an attorney in DEP’s Office of General ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - March 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: iyengarrishi Tags: Uncategorized banned Christopher Byrd climate change DEP Environment Florida global warming rick scott Source Type: news

Properties worth a total of £1bn will fall into the sea because of coastal erosion over next century
Nearly 7,000 properties worth over £1bn will fall into the sea because of coastal erosion over the next century, according to an Environment Agency report. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - December 29, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

EU Just Shy Of Meeting 2020 Emissions Goal After New Greenhouse Gas Cuts Announced
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — The European Union's environment agency says the bloc's greenhouse gas emissions dropped by nearly 2 percent last year, putting the EU very close to reaching its emissions target for 2020. That goal is to reduce emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases by 20 percent compared to 1990 levels. The European Environment Agency said Tuesday that emissions already have fallen 19 percent, meaning the 28-nation bloc is likely to exceed its target. The EEA projected that 2020 emissions will be 21 percent or 24 percent lower than they were in 1990, depending on whether planned ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 28, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

The guillemots of Skomer need YOU!
In 2013, Natural Resources Wales axed funds (around £12,000 per year) for one of the longest running animal studies on record. Tim Birkhead recalls his early research on the guillemots of Skomer and asks for your help to keep the project going Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 27, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Tim Birkhead Tags: Zoology Science Birds Evolution Environment Wildlife Oceans Marine life Fishing Conservation Biology Environment Agency Animals Climate change Oil spills Source Type: news

Engaging with climate change after the UK floods
Extreme weather events are critical opportunities for joining the dots between climate impacts and people's lives, but it's easier to mobilise around other targetsThe Cambrian News, a local newspaper covering mid and west Wales, recently reported that Gwynedd Council was seeking to implement a "managed retreat" (ie, an evacuation) from the tiny town of Fairbourne.Four hundred people – about half the population of the picturesque coastal settlement – attended a town hall meeting where the council made the case that Fairbourne could not be saved from rising sea levels (at least, not in an economically f...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Adam Corner Tags: Comment Guardian Professional Flooding Communication Climate change Sustainability Guardian sustainable business Sustainable living Source Type: news

HS2 rail link: archaeologists and English Heritage clash over the route through a nation's past
Discussion of it is limited to two paragraphs, and the impacts on it limited to three," says English Heritage.Buckinghamshire county council estimates that some 7,000 designated heritage assets will be affected by the London to Birmingham phase of HS2 alone. This includes ancient field boundaries and tracks, historic buildings, hamlets, villages and major archaeological sites. The actual number at risk could be far higher, since that figure excludes historic buildings, sites and remains which have no statutory protection – a large proportion of them.English Heritage has identified a series of listed historic ass...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Robin Stummer Tags: HS2 Culture News Archaeology Heritage Environment Agency The Observer Rail transport Science UK news Source Type: news

HS2 rail link: archaeologists and English Heritage clash over the route through a nation's past
Discussion of it is limited to two paragraphs, and the impacts on it limited to three," says English Heritage.Buckinghamshire county council estimates that some 7,000 designated heritage assets will be affected by the London to Birmingham phase of HS2 alone. This includes ancient field boundaries and tracks, historic buildings, hamlets, villages and major archaeological sites. The actual number at risk could be far higher, since that figure excludes historic buildings, sites and remains which have no statutory protection – a large proportion of them.English Heritage has identified a series of listed historic ass...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Robin Stummer Tags: HS2 Heritage Archaeology Environment Rail transport Culture Science Environment Agency The Observer News UK news Source Type: news

All by myself: is loneliness bad for you?
If you're happily married but want to be alone all the time, is it healthy? Or does solitude start a vicious circle?Perhaps I should feel more concerned about my wife's habit of apologising for me before I meet anyone she knows. The truth is, I'm not even sure what she's apologising for, except that I'm occasionally not that chatty. And I fidget. And my eyes stray about the place when people are talking to me. And I sometimes ask questions that can come off as a bit direct. There was that time, too, at the engagement picnic in Hyde Park, when I excused myself from all the socialising and went and stood by a ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Will Storr Tags: The Guardian Family Psychology Health & wellbeing Life and style Editorial Relationships Source Type: news

Climate change deniers have grasped that markets can't fix the climate | Seumas Milne
The refusal to accept global warming is driven by corporate interests and the fear of what it will cost to try to stop itIt's an unmistakable taste of things to come. The floods that have deluged Britain may be small beer on a global scale. Compared with the cyclone that killed thousands in the Philippines last autumn, the deadly inundations in Brazil or the destruction of agricultural land and hunger in Africa, the south of England has got off lightly.But the message has started to get through. This is exactly the kind of disaster predicted to become ever more frequent and extreme as greenhouse gas-driven climat...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Seumas Milne Tags: Comment The Guardian David Cameron Flooding World news Natural disasters and extreme weather Climate change Politics Climate change scepticism Environment Science Comment is free Source Type: news

How we ended up paying farmers to flood our homes | George Monbiot
This government let the farming lobby rip up the rulebook on soil protection – and now we are suffering the consequencesIt has the force of a parable. Along the road from High Ham to Burrowbridge, which skirts Lake Paterson (formerly known as the Somerset Levels), you can see field after field of harvested maize. In some places the crop lines run straight down the hill and into the water. When it rains, the water and soil flash off into the lake. Seldom are cause and effect so visible.That's what I saw on Tuesday. On Friday, I travelled to the source of the Thames. Within 300 metres of the stone that marked it were p...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2014 Category: Science Authors: George Monbiot Tags: Comment The Guardian David Cameron Farming Flooding World news Natural disasters and extreme weather Owen Paterson Politics UK news Environment Agency Conservatives Labour Agriculture Comment is free Source Type: news

How we ended up paying farmers to flood our homes | George Monbiot
This government let the farming lobby to rip up the rulebook on soil protection – and now we are suffering the consequences• George Monbiot canoes across the UK floods – videoIt has the force of a parable. Along the road from High Ham to Burrowbridge, which skirts Lake Paterson (formerly known as the Somerset Levels), you can see field after field of harvested maize. In some places the crop lines run straight down the hill and into the water. When it rains, the water and soil flash off into the lake. Seldom are cause and effect so visible.That's what I saw on Tuesday. On Friday, I travelled to the source o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2014 Category: Science Authors: George Monbiot Tags: Farming Flooding Owen Paterson Agriculture David Cameron Environment Agency World news Labour Politics Conservatives Natural disasters and extreme weather UK news The Guardian Comment Comment is free Source Type: news

George Monbiot canoes across the UK floods – video
The environmentalist floats across the flood plains in Hurley, Berkshire, one of the villages worst hit by the floodsGuy GrandjeanGeorge Monbiot (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Guy Grandjean, George Monbiot Tags: Farming Flooding UK news Environment Natural disasters and extreme weather David Cameron Politics Owen Paterson Agriculture Environment Agency theguardian.com Comment Comment is free Source Type: news

Flood defences: George Osborne tackled yesterday's crisis at the cost of today's | Chris Huhne
The chancellor's flood defence cuts were driven by deficit reduction. But we can't continue learning by drowningThere is no excuse. In 2010 the coalition slashed spending on flood defences when it should have gone up. Even last year's increase in flood defence spending was under duress. The insurers, some of the most enlightened big businesses on this issue, have repeatedly warned about the rising claims and losses from climate change-induced extreme weather.A confidential deal struck last June, ahead of the spending review, increased flood defence spending as a payback for the insurance companies continuing to provide cov...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Chris Huhne Tags: Comment The Guardian George Osborne Flooding Society Public sector cuts Climate change Politics UK news Conservatives Environment Science Comment is free Source Type: news

The government has to act now on climate change | John Gummer
Floods and extreme weather will become more intense, so Britain needs a long-term plan. The time for buck-passing is overThe harrowing pictures of flood victims, ruined property and stranded stock have brought home the damage the forces of nature can wreak even in our gentle and temperate climate. We must expect this extreme weather to become more frequent, made worse by the warming of the atmosphere. The UK's floods, Australia's record heat, the intense cold in the US, and the unparalleled force of Asian storms remind us that the real issue is intensity. We have to prepare, not just for too much water, but too little; not...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2014 Category: Science Authors: John Gummer Tags: Comment The Guardian Flooding Nicholas Stern Climate change UK news Environment Agency Comment is free Source Type: news

UK floods making climate sceptics hot under the collar | Bob Ward
Bid by Lord Lawson to question the link between global warming and extreme weather is undermined by irrefutable evidenceThe UK floods are not just causing misery for thousands of people around the country whose lives and livelihoods have been disrupted. They are also making a few climate change sceptics hot beneath the collar.No doubt they are finding it an uncomfortable experience to realise that their misleading attempts to inform the public into believing that climate change poses no threat to the UK are now being undermined by the irrefutable evidence provided by the record rainfall and storm surges.First, Peter Lilley...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Bob Ward Tags: Comment theguardian.com Peter Lilley Flooding Natural disasters and extreme weather Climate change Politics UK news Met Office Environment Agency Climate change scepticism Conservatives Science Source Type: news

Climate change means we won't in future be able to engineer our way out of flooding | Hannah Cloke
The Environment Agency could spend its entire budget on flood prevention and Somerset would still be submerged. 'Soft' engineering – using nature – is cheaper and more effectiveThe Environment Agency is battling not only flood water, but a rising tide of criticism. A rural crisis has turned into a political bunfight in which scientific fact plays second fiddle to political expediency.Even some Conservative ministers might think it a bit harsh, and poor spelling, to describe Chris Smith, the Environment Agency's embattled chairman, as a Cnut. But like the 11th century Danish king of England, Lord Smith has shown...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 11, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Cloke Tags: Comment theguardian.com Flooding World news Engineering Technology Natural disasters and extreme weather Climate change UK news Environment Agency Science Comment is free Source Type: news

Nuclear weapons research body gives £8m a year to British universities
A report due out on Wednesday exposes the extent of links between the Atomic Weapons Establishment and universitiesBritain's secretive nuclear weapons research organisation gives over £8m a year in research funding to more than 50 universities, according to documents released under the Freedom of Information Act.The Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), a private consortium that runs nuclear plants at Aldermaston and Burghfield in Berkshire for the Ministry of Defence (MoD), puts most of the money into five of the UK's leading universities with which it has formed "strategic alliances".They are Imperial Colle...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 11, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Rob Edwards Tags: theguardian.com Controversies World news Higher education UK news Weapons technology Nuclear weapons University funding Science Source Type: news

January was England's wettest winter month in almost 250 years
Last month's seasonal total was higher than any since 1767 and three times the average levelThe deluge that has engulfed southern and central England in recent weeks is the worst winter downpour in almost 250 years, according to figures from the world's longest-running weather station.The rainfall measured at the historic Radcliffe Meteorological Station at Oxford University in January was greater than for any winter month since daily recording began there in 1767, and three times the average amount.The latest Met Office data shows that the region from Devon to Kent and up into the Midlands suffered its wettest January sin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 1, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Tags: Flooding News Climate change UK news Weather The Observer Environment Science Source Type: news

Dog disease outbreak prompts call to vets to send tissue samples for tests
Unidentified disease similar to Alabama rot has killed 13 animals across Britain in recent monthsInvestigators are calling on vets to take tissue samples from dogs that die from a mysterious disease that has killed 13 animals across Britain in recent months.The unidentified disease causes small skin ulcers to form on the dogs' legs, and within a week progresses to kidney failure which has been fatal in all but three confirmed cases.The disease is similar to another illness called Alabama rot, which was first spotted in greyhounds in the US in the 1980s. That disease is thought to have been caused by a toxin produced by E c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 23, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: theguardian.com News Animals UK news Life and style Pets Dogs Science Source Type: news

Weather watching: when will the message get through?
Research into public risk protection can only do so much, says David Uzzell – people will always be mesmerised by disasterAs an undergraduate living in a rundown part of Liverpool in the 1970s, I witnessed a fire in an abandoned workshop which my flat overlooked. I stood transfixed. Even at the time I remember thinking about my actions, or rather inactions. I was mesmerised by this elemental force. In a grey, rundown and defeated urban landscape, it was colourful, full of energy and spirit; it seemed to be an invincible force, a symbol of resistance.Several years later I was driving through a village in Cornwall and ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Psychology Blogposts Guardian Professional World news Academics Research Higher education Natural disasters and extreme weather Climate change Higher Education Network Environment Science Source Type: news

Drowning in money: the untold story of the crazy public spending that makes flooding inevitable | George Monbiot
Every year billions are spent in Britain and Europe on policies that wreck homes and lives through floodingWe all know what's gone wrong, or we think we do: not enough spending on flood defences. It's true that the government's cuts have exposed thousands of homes to greater risk, and that the cuts will become more dangerous as climate change kicks in. But too little public spending is a small part of the problem. It is dwarfed by another factor, which has been overlooked in discussions in the media and statements by the government: too much public spending.Vast amounts of public money, running into billions, are spent eve...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 13, 2014 Category: Science Authors: George Monbiot Tags: Comment The Guardian Flooding Climate change UK news Weather Environment Agriculture Science Comment is free Source Type: news

Storm chasing in the UK: Britain's wild weather enthusiasts
As fierce weather batters the UK, a growing number of storm hunters are taking to their cars to chase the wildest conditions. Why? To pit their wits against mother natureAs soon as he was old enough to ride a bike and get it up a hill, David Vicary began watching the weather, waiting for dramatic thunder and lightning, then going out to watch it – "chasing" storms. "As a kid I would look out at the clouds and want to know what was going on," he says. "And later, when I got a car, that opened up the whole world. The other week when storms rolled through London I got up on the roof to watch it....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Emine Saner Tags: The Guardian Hobbies World news Natural disasters and extreme weather Features Life and style Tornadoes Hurricanes Science Source Type: news

Flooding: advice to the public
A new leaflet, flooding: advice for the public, is now available. It was produced by Public Health England in collaboration with the Environment Agency (England) to help those at risk of flooding. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - December 27, 2013 Category: UK Health Authors: Maria Axford Source Type: news

UN agencies urge end to potentially deadly - but preventable - lead paint use
Pregnant mothers and young children in the developing world are exposed to high levels of lead through unsafe paints, particularly in colours yellow and red where lead is added as a pigment, United Nations environment agency today reported amid International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week of Action. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - October 22, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Air pollution still harming health across Europe
Around 90 % of city dwellers in the European Union (EU) are exposed to one of the most damaging air pollutants at levels deemed harmful to health by the World Health Organisation (WHO). This result comes from the latest assessment of air quality in Europe, published by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The report, 'Air quality in Europe - 2013 report', is an EEA contribution to the European Commission's review of air quality policy and the EU 'Year of Air'. Vehicles, industry, agriculture and homes are contributing to air pollution in Europe... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Water - Air Quality / Agriculture Source Type: news

Air pollution 'still harming health'
Some pollutants continue to pose a "significant threat" to European citizens' health and the environment, says a report by the European Environment Agency. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bulgaria’s Air Is Dirtiest in Europe, Study Finds, Followed by Poland
Bulgaria has the highest levels of two kinds of particulate matter that can lead to health problems from asthma to cancer, the European Union says in an environmental study.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By DANNY HAKIM Tags: Hazardous and Toxic Substances Ozone European Union Air Pollution European Environment Agency Sofia (Bulgaria) Source Type: news

Owen Paterson v the science of climate change
The environment secretary has told the Tory conference there are advantages to global warming, but he appears to be viewing the problem through a narrowly British lensThe UK environment secretary, Owen Paterson, has told a fringe meeting at the Conservative party conference: "People get very emotional about this subject [climate change] and I think we should just accept that the climate has been changing for centuries."The UN's climate science panel, the IPCC, said last Friday: "Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and since the 1950s, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to m...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 30, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Adam Vaughan Tags: theguardian.com Blogposts Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) World news Global climate talks United Nations Owen Paterson Politics UK news Conservative conference Conservative conference 2013 Green politics Conservati Source Type: news

Populations of grassland butterflies decline almost 50 percent over 2 decades
(Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres) Grassland butterflies have declined dramatically between 1990 and 2011. This has been caused by intensifying agriculture and a failure to properly manage grassland ecosystems, according to a report from the European Environment Agency. In the report the data of the Butterfly monitoring scheme in Germany have been incorporated, which is scientifically supported by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research. UFZ scientists have also contributed to the analysis of population trends. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 23, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Slug poison found in one in eight of England's drinking water sources
Slug pesticide used in gardens and agriculture linked to high concentrations of toxic chemical in rivers and reservoirsSlug poison was found in one in eight of England's rivers and reservoirs used for drinking water, according to the most recent comprehensive survey of the chemical.The Environment Agency (EA) told the Guardian that between 2009 and 2011 concentrations of metaldehyde, used by farmers to protect their crops from slugs, were found in 81 of England and Wales' 647 reservoirs, rivers and groundwater from which drinking water is sourced. The chemical is almost impossible to remove from drinking water using standa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Karl Mathiesen Tags: Farming News guardian.co.uk UK news Pesticides Gardens Environment Agriculture Source Type: news

Biofuels plant opens to become UK's biggest buyer of wheat
Vivergo plant near Hull will take 1.1m tonnes of wheat a year to turn into ethanol and animal feedA new biofuels plant that has opened today near Hull will be the UK's biggest buyer of wheat, and the biggest supplier of animal feed.Vivergo's plant at Saltend in the Humber estuary, opened with £350m investment, will take in 1.1m tonnes annually of wheat that would otherwise be used for animal feed and produce an estimated 420m litres a year of ethanol, to be mixed with petrol and used in vehicles. A byproduct of the process is high-protein feed for livestock, with about 500,000 tonnes expected a year.Vivergo said the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Tags: Energy News guardian.co.uk Technology Energy research UK news Biofuels Energy industry Environment Business Renewable energy Carbon emissions Science Source Type: news

Science should focus on 'new' environmental health risks, EU report says (Euractiv, 31 May 2013)
A new Environment and human health report published by the European Environment Agency and the European Commission's Joint Research Centre describes environmental policy issues in relation to human health. Full article (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 31, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

In campaign to stem food waste, UN agency spotlights traditional preservation methods
Fermenting birds, naturally freeze-drying potatoes and squeezing meat on a saddle are some of the traditional methods used by cultures around the world to preserve food highlighted today by the United Nations environment agency, which is stressing the importance of reducing food waste. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - May 21, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Radioactive materials lost in more than 30 incidents over past decade
Health and safety watchdog admits firms and hospitals have mislaid dangerous substances that could be used by terroristsRadioactive materials have gone missing from businesses, hospitals and even schools more than 30 times over the last decade, a freedom of information request to the UK's health and safety authorities has revealed.Nuclear experts have warned that some of the lost material could be used by terrorists and said there should be a crackdown by the regulators to ensure such "carelessness" is brought to a speedy halt.Among the big names that have lost potentially dangerous materials are Rolls-Royce at a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 5, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Terry Macalister Tags: Nuclear power The Guardian World news Society Nuclear waste UK news Hospitals Environment Science Source Type: news

'Alien' wildlife in Europe wreaks €12bn damage a year, study shows
From tiger mosquitoes to ragweed, more than 10,000 invasive species are putting increasing pressure on the natural worldAnimals and plants brought to Europe from other parts of the world are a bigger-than-expected threat to health and the environment costing at least €12bn (£10bn) a year, according to a study published on Thursday.More than 10,000 "alien" species have gained a foothold in Europe, from Asian tiger mosquitoes to North American ragweed, and at least 1,500 are known to be harmful, the European Environment Agency (EEA) said."In many areas, ecosystems are weakened by pollution, climate ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Biodiversity Biology World news guardian.co.uk Endangered species Europe Animals Plants Zoology Conservation Environment Invasive species Science Wildlife Source Type: news