The benefit of early survival on PD versus HD-Why this is (still) very important.

The benefit of early survival on PD versus HD-Why this is (still) very important. Perit Dial Int. 2020 Feb 18;:896860819895177 Authors: Marshall MR Abstract There are a number of misconceptions around the identified early survival benefit of peritoneal dialysis (PD) relative to hemodialysis (HD), including that such benefits "even out in the end" since the relative risk of death over time eventually encompasses 1.0 (or even an estimate that is unfavorable to PD); that the early benefit is, in fact, most likely due to unmeasured confounding; and such benefits are only due to the influence of central venous catheters and "crash starters" in the HD group. In fact, the early survival benefit results in a substantial gain of patient life years in PD cohorts relative to HD ones, even if it the benefit appears to "even out in the end," is relatively insensitive to unmeasured confounding, and persists even when the effects of central venous catheters are accounted for. In this review, the calculations and arguments are made to support these tenets. Survival on dialysis is still one of the most important considerations for all stakeholders in the end-stage kidney disease community, including patients who rank it among their top priorities. Shared decision-making is a fundamental patient right and requires both balanced information and an iterative mechanism for a consensual decision based on shared understanding and purpose. A corners...
Source: Peritoneal Dialysis International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Perit Dial Int Source Type: research

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Purpose of review This review aims to provide an up-to-date summary of the definition, current practice and evidence regarding the role of urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (USPD) in patients with end-stage kidney disease who present with unplanned dialysis requirement without functional access. Recent findings USPD can be broadly defined as peritoneal dialysis initiation within the first 2 weeks after catheter insertion. Published practice patterns, in terms of catheter insertion approach, peritoneal dialysis initiation time or initial fill volume, are highly variable. Most evidence comes from small, retrospective, si...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: DIALYSIS AND TRANSPLANTATION: Edited by Anil Chandraker and J. Kevin Tucker Source Type: research
Authors: Niyyar VD Abstract Sonography is increasingly being used by nephrologists and the field of dialysis access is no exception. Advances in technology have allowed the addition of this universally available, portable, non-invasive tool to the nephrologist's armamentarium, which provides information on both morphology and physiology without the need for contrast or radiation. Ultrasound may be used across the spectrum of dialysis access, including central venous catheter placements, vascular mapping, regional anesthesia, creation, maintenance and assessment of hemodialysis access as well as assessment of the ab...
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
Authors: Kim YS, Kim Y, Shin SJ, Lee HS, Kim SG, Cho S, Na KR, Kim JK, Kim SJ, Kim YO, Jin DC Abstract The prevalence rate and the incidence rate of hemodialysis and functioning kidney transplant recipients have continuously increased; on the contrary, those of peritoneal dialysis have continuously decreased since 2006. Dialysis patients have been getting older and have been maintained on dialysis longer. Diabetic nephropathy was the leading cause of end stage renal disease. The type of hemodialysis vascular access has been stable during the last 5 years (arteriovenous fistulas 76%, arteriovenous grafts 16%,...
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Only 23% of patients were referred for vascular access 6 months before the anticipated hemodialysis therapy. In addition, 53% of patients initiated hemodialysis with a central venous catheter. Avoidance of catheter insertion was mostly successful in patients referred 2 months before hemodialysis initiation. The most common modifiable barrier to the timely referral was noncompliance. PMID: 30958094 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
We describe two cases of end-stage renal disease patients with CIED and tunneled central venous catheter (CVC) who developed venous cava stenosis: (1) a 70-year-old man with sinus node disease and pacemaker in 2013, CVC, and a Brescia-Cimino forearm fistula in 2015; (2) a 75-year-old woman with previous ventricular arrhythmia with implanted defibrillator in 2014 and CVC in 2016. In either case, after about 1 year from CVC insertion, patients developed superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome due to stenosis diagnosed by axial computerized tomography. In case 1, the patient was not treated by angioplasty of SVC and removed CVC wit...
Source: Cardiorenal Medicine - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Abstract Urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (USPD) is increasingly seen as a viable alternative to hemodialysis through a central venous catheter for late-presenting end-stage renal disease patients. However, concerns remain about starting dialysis early following the surgical implantation of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter; urgent PD is often thought to be a safe option only after minimally invasive percutaneous catheter insertions. Analysis of the cumulative data from published literature presented in this review appears to negate this general perception and shows that compared to the percutaneous catheter i...
Source: Seminars in Dialysis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Semin Dial Source Type: research
Authors: Piccoli GB, Cabiddu G, Gallieni M Abstract Pregnancy in dialysis patients is a rare but important event that challenges our knowledge and demands re-thinking many aspects of our practice, including vascular access. This editorial briefly discusses some open questions on vascular access in this situation that challenge the motto 'fistula first' and underline the need for personalised approaches. Information on vascular access in pregnant women is scant. Different approaches may be considered between women on dialysis already on a well-functioning tunnelled catheter and newly placed catheters: while a tunnel...
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Noncuffed catheters (NCC) are often used for incident hemodialysis (HD) patients without a functional vascular access. This, unfortunately results in frequent catheter-related complications such as infection, malfunction, vessel stenosis, and obstruction, leading to loss of permanent central venous access with superior vena cava obstruction. It is important to preserve central vein patency by reducing the number of internal jugular catheter insertions for incident HD patients with a functional vascular access. We sought to achieve this by introducing in-patient intermittent peritoneal dialysis...
Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Med Sci Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Compared with patients with nonoptimal starts, patients with optimal ESRD starts have lower morbidity and mortality and less use of inpatient and outpatient care. Late-stage chronic kidney disease and ESRD care in an integrated system may be associated with greater benefits than those previously reported in the literature. PMID: 30325191 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The American Journal of Managed Care - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Am J Manag Care Source Type: research
This article examines the rationale and feasibility for starting peritoneal dialysis urgently in late-presenting end-stage renal disease patients and reviews the literature to compare the urgent-start peritoneal dialysis with conventional peritoneal dialysis and urgent-start haemodialysis. PMID: 29616470 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: J Nephrol Source Type: research
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