Young Black Adults More Prone to Stroke, but Don't Know It

THURSDAY, Feb. 13, 2020 -- Young black Americans face higher rates of stroke than others as a result of high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity, new research suggests. But the same study finds they typically underestimate their stroke risk. " If...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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Abstract Primary Prevention of Acute Stroke Abstract. Strokes are frequent. Vascular risk factors are increasing the stroke risk. Most vascular risk factors are treatable. Their therapy is important in the primary prevention of stroke. According to the INTERSTROKE study, arterial hypertension, inactivity, overweight, dyslipidemia, smoking, unhealthy diet, cardiac pathologies such as major arrhythmia, diabetes mellitus, stress/depression and overconsumption of alcohol are the most important treatable vascular risk factors. In this article, we will also report on at present less well known treatable vascular risk fa...
Source: Praxis - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Praxis (Bern 1994) Source Type: research
Unhealthy food habits are associated with non-communicable diseases (NCD) [1 –3] and nutritional deficiencies [4]. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) [5], more than half of all deaths were due to ten main causes, with the leading killers being ischaemic heart disease and stroke. Diets characterized by a low intake of fruit and vegetable (FV) and fibre increas e the risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), obesity, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), gastrointestinal cancers, nutritional deficiencies, pancreatic diseases, depression and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia [4–7].
Source: Maturitas - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
By KOUSIK KRISHNAN, MD As many industries and individuals are struggling publicly with burnout, a new study from the European Journal of Preventative Cardiology links the “burnout syndrome” with atrial fibrillation (afib). The findings are both interesting and valuable. In general, the public benefits from anything that can raise awareness of heart disease, because early intervention directly impacts improved patient outcomes. However, headlines that describe afib as a “deadly irregular heartbeat” go too far in the name of public awareness. The truth is,...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Patients afib atrial fibrillation cardiac care irregular heartbeat Kousik Krishnan Source Type: blogs
This study was not perfect. You could argue, as these authors do, that the fact that participants chose their preferred diet is a good thing, as it could theoretically improve adherence. However, it also resulted in very different-sized groups to start with. The varying adherence and exercise option choices were adjusted for as well as possible. And the study relied heavily on self-reporting, which is always iffy. Healthy eating patterns have benefits beyond weight loss But we can still learn a great deal here. The Mediterranean approach to eating (which can be easily modified to suit any country or cultural food preferenc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cooking and recipes Diet and Weight Loss Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: BMI has a nonlinear relationship with 1-year unplanned readmission in patients with myocardial infarction. The 1-year unplanned readmission rate of overweight patients (BMI > 29.3 kg/m2) has increased significantly. Obesity paradox does not exist in terms of readmission of Chinese patients with myocardial infarction after PCI. PMID: 32148951 [PubMed]
Source: Cardiology Research and Practice - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Cardiol Res Pract Source Type: research
mmittee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality, and healthcare use. Great strides have been made in stroke prevention and rhythm control strategies, yet reducing the incidence of AF has been slowed by the increasing incidence and prevalence of AF risk factors, including obesity, physical inactivity, sleep apnea, diabetes melli...
Source: Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circulation Source Type: research
Much more than just a cosmetic issue, obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, fatty liver disease, sleep apnea, arthritis, gallbladder disease and more, according to the U.S. National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
TUESDAY, Feb. 25, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Risk factors that can lead to heart disease and stroke include obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure. For African Americans, another issue also threatens their cardiovascular health:...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
ConclusionsPatients with CMS were more likely to present with increased comorbidities. Patients with CMS undergoing CABG were at risk for worse short ‐term secondary postoperative outcomes and reduced long‐term survival. The data supports the need for further investigation for risk reduction surrounding operative revascularization.
Source: Journal of Cardiac Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
(Natural News) Heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases (e.g., stroke) are the leading causes of death in western countries. These diseases are caused by several factors, such as hypertension, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, smoking and obesity. However, recent studies have found that there is another unexpected contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis (blood clot...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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