Temporal Trends in the Incidence of Anogenital Warts: Impact of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

Background Studies in countries with high human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage have demonstrated marked reductions in anogenital wart (AGW) incidence. Our goal was to assess the impact of HPV vaccination in a population with suboptimal coverage by comparing AGW incidence trends in the years before and after vaccine introduction. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of AGW incidence trends using an ecologic study design among 11- through 39-year-olds enrolled at Kaiser Permanente Northwest. We defined incidence as the proportion of persons who had a new AGW diagnosis for each calendar year in the prevaccine periods (2000 through 2006 for female individuals, 2000 through 2010 for male individuals) and the postvaccine periods (2007 through 2016 for female individuals, 2011 through 2016 for male individuals). We also described cumulative HPV vaccination coverage. Results The average annual AGW incidence rates in the prevaccine periods were 27.8 per 10,000 in female individuals and 26.9 per 10,000 in male individuals. In the postvaccine periods, AGW incidence rates decreased by 31% (P
Source: Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Category: Sexual Medicine Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research

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Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted virus. The high-risk HPV types (i.e., HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59) are considered to be the main etiological agents of genital tract cancers, such as cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, and anal cancers, and of a subset of head and neck cancers. Three prophylactic HPV vaccines are available that are bivalent (vs. HPV16, 18), tetravalent (vs. HPV6, 11, 16, 18), and non-avalent (vs. HPV6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33,45, 52, 58). All of these vaccines are based on recombinant DNA technology, and they are prepared from the purified L1 protein that s...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract HPV is still the most common sexually transmitted infection, leading to the onset of many disorders while causing an increase in direct and indirect health costs. High Risk (HR) HPV is the primary cause of invasive cervical cancer and contributes significantly to the development of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. The introduction of universal HPV vaccination has led to a significant reduction in vaccine-targeted HPV infections, cross-protective genotypes, precancerous lesions and anogenital warts. Despite the several limitations of HPV vaccination programs, including vaccine type specificity, differ...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
This is a public health success story. A landmark report on the effectiveness of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (4vHP) in the U.S. is now a matter of medical record. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S., with nearly 80 million people infected with some type of HPV at some point in their lives [1]. About 14 million Americans, including teens, become infected each year [2]. HPV causes genital warts and is associated with an estimated 33,700 newly diagnosed cancers every year in the U.S.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
AbstractIn the U.S. there is an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). One of the most prevalent STIs is the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Certain high risk strains of HPV are believed to cause virtually all cervical cancers, over 90% of anal cancers, 70% of oropharyngeal cancers, and the majority of anal  genital warts. HPV is preventable through vaccination and is available for both men and women. Several educational interventions have been employed, yet baseline awareness and knowledge related to HPV and 9vHPV remains relatively low among young men. What is not known is the most effective method for provid...
Source: Journal of Community Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
An analysis covering 66 million young people has found plummeting rates of precancerous lesions and genital warts after vaccination against the human papillomavirus.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Women and Girls Vaccination and Immunization Cervical Cancer Sexually Transmitted Diseases Warts Gardasil (Vaccine) Third World and Developing Countries Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Lancet, The (J Source Type: news
Conclusions Human immunodeficiency virus–positive men have a high burden of genital HPV infection and AGW. The ART and HPV vaccine could reduce this burden.
Source: Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Category: Sexual Medicine Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
In this study it was assumed that there was no immunity following resolution of natural infection. The modeling demonstrated that a vaccine of moderate efficacy could have a significant impact on the prevalence of gonorrhea if strategically implemented (23). While encouraging it does, of course, depend on the availability of a vaccine. From Ecological Data to Evidence The epidemiological evidence from Cuba, Brazil, and New Zealand demonstrates that N. meningitidis OMV vaccines are possibly able to provide some broader protection against meningococcal disease (17, 24), particularly in older children and adults (25). These...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions These findings suggest that the degree of HPV vaccine impact has varied substantially by age and sex. Achieving the full prevention potential of HPV vaccines will likely require greater coverage among both females and males. Post-licensure estimates of effectiveness demonstrate the real-world benefit of the vaccine.
Source: Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Category: Sexual Medicine Tags: Review Source Type: research
Conclusions: Genotyping of HPV provides significant clinical information regarding this family of viruses that play a role in the aetiology of a variety of genital cancers, as some of these malignancies are now considered preventable due to recent development of vaccines. We believe that our results may provide guidance on future vaccination programs in our country. PMID: 30858783 [PubMed]
Source: Advances in Dermatology and Allergology - Category: Dermatology Tags: Postepy Dermatol Alergol Source Type: research
Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection and is associated with the development of cervical cancer. The purpose of this report is to provide the literature evidences on selecting the HPV vaccine for national immunization program (NIP) in Korea. To complete these tasks, we reviewed domestic and foreign literature on the current status of HPV infection, efficacy and effectiveness of HPV vaccine, safety of vaccine and cost effectiveness analysis of vaccination business. Given that the median age of first sexual intercourse is continuing to fall, this may have ser...
Source: J Korean Med Sci - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
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