Treatment Decisions for a Future Self

Interview with Claire J. Creutzfeldt, MD, author of Treatment Decisions for a Future Self: Ethical Obligations to Guide Truly Informed Choices
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: podcasts

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Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is classified into six types based on codon 129 polymorphism in the PRNP gene and the protease-resistant prion-related protein, PrP [1,2]. This classification corresponds well with the clinical course and the pathological findings. MM2-cortical type sCJD (MM2C-sCJD) is clinically characterized by slow progressive dementia, increased levels of 14 –3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and no periodic synchronous discharge (PSD) in electroencephalography [3].
Source: Journal of the Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
dez M PMID: 31994168 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Revista de Neurologia - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Rev Neurol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 28 January 2020Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Andrew R. Brodbelt, Jacqui Vinten, Susan LarkinAbstractThe unanticipated diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (sCJD) in a patient after previous neurosurgery can lead to difficult decisions on informing contacts. A patient developed sCJD three years after neurosurgery. There were 29 potential contacts and 26 were contacted. Twelve completed a questionnaire. The majority of patients wished to know about the contact, to be seen face-to-face, and their main concern was developing the disease, despite verbal and written...
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Campaigners have argued for open access to scientific research since the dawn of the internet – so why is it taking so long?In December 2002, a Belfast teenager made world headlines after his father, Don Simms, won him the legal right to access an experimental drug. Jonathan Simms had been diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a cruel and fatal neurodegenerative condition that gives sufferers an average of one year to live.After receiving the drug pentosan polysulfate, Jonathan lived for another 10 years, defying all medical expectations. The court ruling made medical history: until that point the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Universities Education Higher education Global research Research publishing Science Source Type: news
Campaigners have argued for open access to scientific research since the dawn of the internet – so why is it taking so long?In December 2002, a Belfast teenager made world headlines after his father, Don Simms, won him the legal right to access an experimental drug. Jonathan Simms had been diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a cruel and fatal neurodegenerative condition that gives sufferers an average of one year to live.After receiving the drug pentosan polysulfate, Jonathan lived for another 10 years, defying all medical expectations. The court ruling made medical history: until that point the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Universities Education Higher education Global research Research publishing Science Source Type: news
AbstractPrions, which cause fatal neurodegenerative disorders such as Creutzfeldt ‐Jakob disease (CJD), are misfolded and infectious protein aggregates. Currently, there are no treatments available to halt or even delay the progression of prion disease in the brain. The infectious nature of prions has resulted in animal paradigms that accurately recapitulate all aspects of prio n disease, and these have proven to be instrumental for testing the efficacy of candidate therapeutics. Nonetheless, infection of cultured cells with prions provides a much more powerful system for identifying molecules capable of interfering with...
Source: Journal of Neurochemistry - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: REVIEW ARTICLE Source Type: research
Contributors : Penny J Norsworthy ; Andrew G Thompson ; Tze H Mok ; Ross W Paterson ; Jonathan M Schott ; John Collinge ; Simon Mead ; Emmanuelle A Vir éSeries Type : Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensSporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) presents as a rapidly progressive dementia which is usually fatal within six months. No blood tests are currently available for diagnosis or disease monitoring. Here, we profile blood microRNA (miRNA) expression in sCJD. Small RNA-sequencing of 57 sCJD patients and 50 healthy controls reveals differential expression of hsa-let-7i-5p, h...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
This review found that although Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), particularly iatrogenic CJD, is rare, the incidence of sporadic CJD is increasing. Clinicians and surveillance programmes should maintain awareness of CJD to mitigate future incidences of its transmission.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: Pharmacology &TherapeuticsAuthor(s): Yutaka Nakagawa, Shizuo YamadaAbstractCreutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is characterized by a rapidly progressive dementia often accompanied by myoclonus and other signs of brain dysfunction, relying on the conversion of the normal cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) to a misfolded form (PrPSc). The neuropathological changes include spongiform degeneration, neuronal loss, astrogliosis, and deposition of PrPSc. It is still unclear how these pathological changes correlate with the development of CJD symptoms because few pa...
Source: Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: Anaesthesia &Intensive Care MedicineAuthor(s): Michelle LeemansAbstractThe prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), are a group of neurodegenerative diseases. They are caused by an abnormal form of a naturally occurring cellular protein, known as prion protein. All prion diseases are fatal and without cure. Although all are rare, interest has increased over the last 20 years due to the appearance of a new prion disease called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. This disease is transmissible via medical devices and blood and therefore ...
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
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