Emotional Abuse and Adolescents ’ Social Anxiety: the Roles of Self-Esteem and Loneliness

AbstractWhile emotional abuse has effects on social anxiety, little is known about mechanisms of this relationship, particularly in China. To address this gap, this cross-sectional study estimated mediating roles of self-esteem and loneliness in the relationship between emotional abuse and social anxiety in Chinese culture. 569 adolescents and pre-adolescents (aged between 10 and 15  years, M = 11.68, SD = 0.83; 50.62% boys) completed a series of questionnaires inquiring about emotional abuse, social anxiety, loneliness, and self-esteem. Structural equation modeling was used to examine mediating roles of self-esteem and loneliness in the relationship between emotional abuse and social anxiety. The results revealed that emotional abuse was positively associated with social anxiety and loneliness (r = .36, .29, respectively,p 
Source: Journal of Family Violence - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

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This study examined the content-specificity of dysfunctional social beliefs to Social Anxiety Disorder (SoAD) in a large, clinically referred sample of children with a variety of anxiety, mood and externalizing disorders. The effects of c...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2020Source: Journal of Anxiety DisordersAuthor(s): Jiemiao Chen, Esther van den Bos, P. Michiel WestenbergAbstractAlthough visual avoidance of faces is a hallmark feature of social anxiety disorder (SAD) on clinical and theoretical grounds, empirical support is equivocal. This review aims to clarify under which conditions socially anxious individuals display visual avoidance of faces. Through a systematic search in Web of Science and PubMed up to March 2019 we identified 61 publications that met the inclusion criteria. We discuss the influence of three factors on the extent to ...
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
“Care about what other people think and you will always be their prisoner.” ~ Lao Tzu We carefully pick out what we wear to the gym to make sure we look good in the eyes of the other gym goers. We beat ourselves up after meetings running through everything we said (or didn’t say), worried that coworkers will think we aren’t smart or talented enough. We post only the best picture out of the twenty-seven selfies we took and add a flattering filter to get the most likes to prove to ourselves that we are pretty and likable. We live in other people’s heads. And all it does is make us judge ourselve...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General LifeHelper Publishers Self-Esteem Self-Help Tiny Buddha Social Anxiety Worry Source Type: blogs
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Source: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
This study analyze...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
You're reading How to Beat Your Social Anxiety in 2020, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Bidding farewell to the past year and welcoming the next can be incredibly exciting and promising. If the thought of attending a New Year's Eve bash leaves you with sweaty palms and heart palpitations, however, you're not alone. About 15 million people in America, including myself, struggle with social anxiety. This disorder can make the new year an extremely stressful event.  Luckily, if you've resolved to bea...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured psychology self confidence self improvement anxiety pickthebrain social anxiety Source Type: blogs
It’s completely normal to feel anxious in social situations. Be it giving a speech or talking on the phone, social anxiety affects a surprisingly large percentage of the population. However, when one experiences considerable distress and an impaired ability to function in parts of their daily life, it is likely they will be diagnosed as social anxiety disorder.1 Many people with social anxiety disorder do not know that they have it. They may recognize that there is something “wrong,” but do not know what it is or what to do about it. This is where mindfulness can help. By being mindful, aware of the prese...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mindfulness Jon Kabat Zinn Meditation secular mindfulness Social Anxiety Source Type: blogs
;a-Chong MG Abstract INTRODUCTION: Several studies have found that individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience relatively high rates of anxiety and depression; however, there are few reports about social anxiety in individuals with MS. AIM: To analyze the prevalence of social anxiety disorder and other psychiatric comorbidities in MS patients compared to matched controls. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We included 50 patients with MS that were seen during regularly scheduled visits and 50 sex- and age-matched participants from the general population within a six-month interval. All included participants c...
Source: Revista de Neurologia - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Rev Neurol Source Type: research
BACKGROUND: The social, normative nature of alcohol use may make college students with social anxiety vulnerable to problematic alcohol use. Yet, social anxiety is typically unrelated to drinking quantity or frequency. One potential explanation is that res...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
ConclusionsThe study is the first to demonstrate in an ecologically valid manner that DP/DR regularly occur in relation to feelings of embarrassment in controls and in individuals suffering from SP or MDD. DP and DR might be responses to strong emotions, like embarrassment, or might be attempts at coping. The higher emergence of embarrassment itself might be viewed as an indicator of maladaptation. Treatment interventions correcting for these misinterpretations might reduce DP/DR.
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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