Pulp Chamber Temperature Increase from Curing Light Units: An In Vitro Study

Source: Journal of Dentistry for Children - Category: Dentistry Authors: Tags: Scientific Articles Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 15 November 2018Source: Interdisciplinary NeurosurgeryAuthor(s): Jitender Chaturvedi, Garga Basu, Divya Singh, Neha Singh, Anil Sharma, Harsh Deora, Priyadarshi DikshitAbstractIntraventricular meningiomas (IVM) are rare and constitutes only 1% of all such tumours, intracranially. This is supported by the fact that there had only been two case series from India. Both these studies are from major centres and have reported just nine and twelve cases of IVM respectively, over a span of twelve years. As compared to larger lesions, smaller ones do not manifest early, due to sufficient accommoda...
Source: Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 November 2018Source: Contemporary Educational PsychologyAuthor(s): Jamie L. Tock, K.A. EricssonAbstractPrevious research has indicated positive relations between a curricular emphasis during college and improvements in GRE performance for content that matches that emphasis. However, measurement issues and a lack of a theoretical approach have contributed to a lack of precision and detail in the estimates of the relation between college experiences and performance for relevant content. In the current study, we hypothesized that differences in training between students majoring in math r...
Source: Contemporary Educational Psychology - Category: Child Development Source Type: research
Driving can be fun, but mostly it is a utilitarian activity, often boring, but potentially lethal, particularly when the driver engages in a distracting secondary task such as texting (or emailing or dialing) (texting while driving [TWD]). Secondary tasks are not essential to the driving task and distracting to the extent they take the driver's eyes and mind off the driving task. The longer a driver's eyes are off the forward roadway for any reason, the greater the likelihood of a crash, a wayward glance of 2 seconds approximately doubling the risk of a crash [1,2].
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Over the last two decades, there has been attention to promoting meaningful youth “engagement,” “participation” and “voice” in adolescent health [1–3]. UN and other investments in reports, network-building, and meetings like the Bali Global Youth forum raised the visibility of youth engagement as a priority, sharing principles, examples, and challenges across divers e contexts [2,4–14]. Recently, the Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing provided an overview of youth engagement and health, including barriers to meaningful engagement [15].
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
The face of anorexia nervosa (AN) is changing, with a large and growing number of atypical patients. Atypical anorexia nervosa (AAN) describes patients with significant weight loss who meet the criteria for AN but are not underweight [1]. A few available studies of AAN describe this group as largely overweight or obese prior to illness [2] and inclusive of more boys and lower socioeconomic status youth [3]. While they are not technically underweight, patients with AAN present for care with marked malnutrition.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Suicides triggered by the suicide of a peer, celebrity, or fictional character, often referred to as “copycat” suicides, have been reported for centuries [1–5]. The closely related concept of “suicide contagion” or “suicide clusters” is based on the idea that one inciting suicide triggers the suicide of others in time or space [6–8]. On March 31st, 2017, Netflix released 13 Reasons Why, a 13-part series about a high school student who commits suicide after being repeatedly bullied and assaulted.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
The millennial generation, defined by the US Census Bureau as those born between 1982 and 2000, outnumber the previous baby boomer generation by 10% [1]. Nineteen percent, or 61 million people, of the US population are between the ages of 12 and 26 [2]. Among this transition-aged group, 25% –30% have one or more chronic conditions [3,4]. Over the last several decades, due to advances in pediatric care and early identification efforts, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of youth with chronic conditions, with important implications for transition to adult health care.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
In this issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health, a study by Carrasco-Garrido et al. assessed trends in misuse of prescription tranquilizers, sedatives, and sleeping pills over time in a school-based sample of adolescents in Spain [1]. Their results showed that the prevalence of misuse increased significantly from 2004 –2014, that girls had a higher prevalence of misuse than boys, and that the use of alcohol and other drugs was a strong correlate of misuse. This research is important in that it shines a light on a class of prescription drugs that have been overlooked.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
This study aimed to identify trends in self-harm admissions to a tertiary children's hospital with special attention paid to the time after series release.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
This study compared total weight loss and recent weight loss with admission weight as predictors of physical and psychological complications.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
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