DR ELLIE CANNON: How can I keep my gummy eyes clean?

Swollen, red and itchy eyes are very common in people of all ages, and especially those with allergies and asthma, writes DR ELLIE CANNON.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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When I worked at Greenpeace for five years before I attended medical school, a popular slogan was, “think globally, act locally.” As I write this blog about climate change and hay fever, I wonder if wiping off my computer that I’ve just sneezed all over due to my seasonal allergies counts as abiding by this aphorism? (Can you clean a computer screen with a tissue?) Come to think of it, my allergies do seem to be worse in recent years. So do those of my patients. It seems as if I’m prescribing nasal steroids and antihistamines, recommending over-the-counter eye drops, and discussing ways to avoid all...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Allergies Environmental health Source Type: blogs
ing Because of exposure to a number of potential health hazards within the work environment, hairstylists experience occupational diseases that include occupational asthma, skin conditions and musculoskeletal diseases. The paucity of studies assessing occupational safety and hygiene management among Afro-Caribbean hair salon operators in the UK promoted the study. QualtricsTM was used to assess the participants’ perception of exposure to hair products and their personal safety and hygiene knowledge, attitudes, awareness, and risk perceptions at work. In five salons, indoor air quality was monitored over one w...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Recent publications in The Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology have documented the pain and suffering associated with cutaneous allergy.1,2 In the current issue of The Annals, Jonathan Silverberg reviews a number of comorbid health problems associated with atopic dermatitis (AD). Of greatest interest to allergists, AD predisposes to a higher risk of food allergy, eosinophilic esophagitis, and respiratory allergy.3 The systemic effects of AD are also manifested by a higher risk for infectious and cardiovascular risk.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Discussion Atopic dermatitis (AD) has a prevalence of 3-5% in the overall U.S. population but is increasing with an estimated 10-15% lifetime risk in childhood. It is even more common in children of color with a prevalence in African-American/black children of 17% and Hispanic children of 14%. Health care utilization data also appears to support more severe disease in children of color also. Atopic dermatitis or eczema is a common dermatological skin problem which characteristically is a pruritic, papular eruption with erythema. Like most papulosquamous eruptions it often occurs in intertrigenous areas in people with alle...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) is a very common chronic inflammatory disease of the upper airways, characterized by symptoms such as nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, itching and also itchy-watery eyes 1. The disease has an estimated worldwide prevalence of 15-25% 2 carrying a high global burden particularly among children and adolescents 2,3.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease, characterized by a fluctuating course, intense itch, and strongly inflamed skin lesions,1 putatively caused by a complex interaction of genetic, immune and environmental factors.2 AD is a highly heritable disease, showing strong associations with filaggrin (FLG) gene null mutations and Th2 signaling pathways,2 that have implications for epithelial barrier and skin inflammatory properties in affected individuals, respectively.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, predominantly type 2 inflammatory skin disease that affects up to 10% of adults and 20% of children [1 –5]. Moderate-to-severe AD is characterized by extensive eczematous lesions, pronounced persistent, severe itch [6–8], substantial pain and discomfort [9–12], and is frequently associated with other type 2 (atopic/allergic) comorbidities, e.g. asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP), eosinophilic esophagitis, and food allergies [8,13–15], and a significant disease burden, e.g.
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Grains can play havoc with your skin. The prolamin proteins, such as gliadin,  trigger autoimmune skin reactions and turn antibodies against the skin enzymes, their lectins fan the fires of inflammation, their proteins provoke allergies, and their amylopectins send blood sugar and insulin sky-high and provoke the skin-disrupting hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF). The whole grain package adds up to an impressive collection of skin conditions that can take a variety of forms, from simple red, itchy rashes to scaly, oily raised patches to large vesicles to gangrene. B...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs
Grains can play havoc with your skin. The prolamin proteins, such as gliadin,  trigger autoimmune skin reactions and turn antibodies against the skin enzymes, their lectins fan the fires of inflammation, their proteins provoke allergies, and their amylopectins send blood sugar and insulin sky-high and provoke the skin-disrupting hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF). The whole grain package adds up to an impressive collection of skin conditions that can take a variety of forms, from simple red, itchy rashes to scaly, oily raised patches to large vesicles to gangrene. B...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs
If you shower before bed, you’ve probably wondered whether sleeping with damp hair is a problem. Maybe you’ve heard it could make you sick, or that it can damage your hair or skin. What’s the truth? Let’s address the “it can make you sick” myth first. “This idea seems to fit into the old bit of folklore that getting yourself chilled and wet will cause you to come down with a cold,” says Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. While this idea persists, Schaffner says it was long ago disprove...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
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