Department of Health Services Teams with the Milwaukee Brewers to Promote Immunizations

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) is excited to announce that it has partnered with the Milwaukee Brewers Community Foundation topromote immunizations through public service announcements (PSA ’s) recorded in Spanish by Brewers’ catchers Yasmani Grandal and Manny Pina. In the sixty-second PSA’s, Grandal and Pina talk about importance of protecting your family by having them vaccinated against diseases like measles, mumps, whooping cough,...(see release)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - Category: Hospital Management Authors: Source Type: news

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Preterm babies were more than 20 percent less likely to have had required shots by 19 months.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Premature Babies Babies and Infants Whooping Cough Tetanus Vaccination and Immunization Hepatitis Mumps Measles Source Type: news
Legislators trying to curb the numbers of unvaccinated children have been met with vigorous opposition from upset parents.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Children and Childhood Parenting Freedom of Religion Whooping Cough Medicine and Health Measles Law and Legislation Mumps Epidemics Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Centers for Disease Control Source Type: news
Christina Hildebrand went down a rabbit hole and emerged at the statehouse in Sacramento. That’s how she describes it–going down a rabbit hole–and in her case it happened 14 years ago, when she was pregnant with her first child. In a world filled with chemicals and toxins, processed foods and GMOs, she decided her baby would be brought up as naturally and chemical-free as possible. It was when she was researching how best to achieve that goal that she bumped into vaccines. That was a bad time to begin thinking about such things. The fraudulent 1998 paper by British physician Andrew Wakefield ostensibly li...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized vaccines Source Type: news
(VANCOUVER, Wash.) — Parents in Washington state will no longer be able to claim a personal or philosophical exemption for their children from receiving the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine before attending a day care center or school under a measure signed Friday by Gov. Jay Inslee. The state saw more than 70 cases of measles this year, and Inslee signed the bill at Vancouver City Hall, in the county where most of those cases were centered. The new law takes effect at the end of July. Inslee said that while the bill was an important step in public health, he warned it doesn’t do “everything ne...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized measles onetime washington Source Type: news
Anti-vaccination movements lure increasingly more people into skipping potentially life-saving immunization against infectious diseases, such as measles, mumps, or rubella, highly impairing herd immunity for entire communities. Social media platforms could restrict the reach of anti-vax messages, groups, and activities, with algorithms recommending tailor-made content and health apps providing information about vaccinations. Here’s our collection of the most recent steps and digital tools supporting the fight against anti-vaccination and its believers. 300 percent increase in measles globally In a widely shared...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Empowered Patients Future of Medicine anti-vaccination anti-vax anti-vaxxer digital disease disease outbreak facebook figth Health Healthcare infection Innovation measles movement social media technology Source Type: blogs
Do vaccines cause autism? Is it OK to skip certain vaccines? Get the facts on these and other common questions. Childhood vaccines protect children from a variety of serious or potentially fatal diseases, including diphtheria, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and others. If these diseases seem uncommon -- or even unheard of [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news
She walked into the emergency room with an infant in her arms. "My baby, please help my baby," she said between sobs. I followed her into the room and asked what her baby's name was and whether I could hold her.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
[The Conversation Africa] Over the years vaccines have prevented countless cases of disease and saved millions of lives. Infectious diseases like polio, measles, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), rubella (German measles), smallpox, mumps, tetanus and rotavirus used to be common around the world. Today vaccines can prevent them.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, got her granddaughter immunized using a mix of private and public clinics. Credit: Veronique Magnin – Habari Kibra VolunteerBy Joyce NgangaNAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 25 2018 (IPS)Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, is certain that her grand-daughter needs to get all her vaccines for her to grow up healthy and strong. She uses a mix of private and public clinics in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlement in Nairobi, to get the 15-month-old the shots she needs. Mary Awour, mother to two-year-old Vilance Amondi, also believes immunization is important to protect her ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
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