Using 'Acid Reflux' To Kill Cancer Cells

A University of Central Florida chemist has come up with a unique way to kill certain cancer cells - give them acid reflux. Chemistry professor Kevin Belfield used a special salt to make cancer cells more acidic - similar to the way greasy foods cause acid reflux in some people. He used a light-activated, acid-generating molecule to make the cells more acidic when exposed to specific wavelengths of light, which in turn kills the bad cells. The surrounding healthy cells stay intact. The technique is a simple way around a problem that has frustrated researchers for years...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

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Conclusions: The expression of MMP-9 is most common in severe forms compared to the mild forms of GRD. PMID: 31264989 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cirugia y Cirujanos - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Cir Cir Source Type: research
Gluten? Lactose? Stomach pain? Digestive troubles? Way too many people suffer from gastrointestinal issues, and much less are aware of the digital technologies that can come to their aid. Did you know that digestibles could successfully replace the dreaded colonoscopy? Or have you heard about microbiome testing? What about the swarm of health apps supporting dietary restrictions? We took a deep breath and jumped into the universe of digital technologies just to bring you as much information about the future of gastroenterology as possible. Will you jump after us? IBS, colorectal cancer, and other animals Referring to...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers diet dieting digestibles digestion digital health gastro gastroenterologist gastroenterology gastrointestinal gluten gut Innovation lactose microbiome stomach techno Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: The history of renal scleroderma crisis and the positivity of anti-topoisomerase I antibodies were associated with an increased risk of cancer in SSc patients in this monocentric study. PMID: 31255252 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Revue de Medecine Interne - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Rev Med Interne Source Type: research
Esophageal surgery has become quite specialized, and both dedicated diagnostic and refined surgical techniques are required to deliver state-of-the-art care. The field has evolved to include endoscopic mucosal resection and radiofrequency ablation for early-stage esophageal cancer and minimally invasive esophagectomy with the reconstruction of a gastric conduit for carefully selected patients with esophageal cancer or those with “end-stage” esophagus from benign diseases. Reoperative esophageal surgery after esophagectomy deserves special mention given that these patients, with improved survival, are presenting...
Source: Journal of Thoracic Imaging - Category: Radiology Tags: Symposium: Imaging of Innovative and Contemporary Thoracic Interventions: State-of-the-Art Source Type: research
Authors: El-Salhy M, Gilja OH, Hatlebakk JG Abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) overlap. It is not clear whether GERD is caused by non‑erosive esophagitis, or erosive esophagitis. The Rome criteria are not widely used for the diagnosis of IBS in the clinic. In total, 1,489 IBS patients without red flags were included in the present retrospective study. They comprised of 1,331 females and 158 males with a mean age of 51 years. The diagnosis of IBS was verified by endoscopic and histopathological examinations. Whereas erosive esophagitis occurred in 97% of patient...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
In this study, repetitive applications of conjugated primary bile acids with unconjugated secondary bile acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), on human hypopharyngeal primary cells reveal that strongly acidic pH (4.0) optimally enhances the tumorigenic effect of bile, by inducing activation of NF‐κB, STAT3 nuclear translocation, bcl‐2 overexpression and significant overexpression of the oncogenic mRNA phenotype, compared to weakly acidic pH (5.5) or neutral pH (7.0). As the pH b ecomes less acidic the partially activated primary bile acids and activated DCA begin to exert their influence; however, with significantly less...
Source: Cancer Medicine - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
AbstractIn the West, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which is a long-term complication of damage by gastroesophageal reflux, has been rising over recent decades. Two main factors are likely to account for this increase. The first is the rising incidence of central obesity which promotes gastroesophageal reflux. The second is the falling incidence ofH. pylori infection and associated atrophic gastritis which reduces the acidity and peptic activity of gastric juice, the main factors damaging to the esophageal mucosa. The rise in esophageal adenocarcinoma has been mirrored by a fall in gastric cancer consistent wi...
Source: Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
New research finds a link between proton pump inhibitors and heightened risk of death from heart disease, kidney disease, and stomach cancer.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Acid Reflux / GERD Source Type: news
Endoscopic screening for Barrett esophagus (BE) is currently recommended for men with chronic (>5 years) and/or frequent (weekly or more) symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) with two or more additional risk factors (age>50, Caucasian, central obesity, smoking, confirmed family history). We hypothesized that individuals with EAC (cases) would be more likely to have frequent symptoms during early to mid-adulthood (age 18 to 50) compared to population controls. Our study aimed to determine whether cases were more likely to experience GERD symptoms through age 50 than individuals without EAC (population controls) ...
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Monday abstract Source Type: research
With increasing prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) worldwide, reflux symptoms have been associated with the cancer risk and reduced quality of life. Anti-reflux surgery has been the mainstay of treatment in GERD refractory to standard medical therapy; however adverse events such as dysphagia, flatulence, inability to belch, and invasiveness of surgical procedure remain a concern. Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) has been considered a minimally invasive procedure. Studies have reported good efficacy and safety profile making TIF a promising procedure to fill the gap between medical and surgical approach.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Tuesday abstract Source Type: research
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