Killed by cholera, Yemeni doctor knew he was fighting 'disastrous' epidemic

Yemeni doctor Mohammed Abdul-Mughni described the surge in cholera cases he was treating as "disastrous" in a country battered by years of war and short of medical staff.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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At midnight on Thursday March 26, all of South Africa went into lockdown. For the next 21 days, no one is to leave their homes unless they are going to the grocery store, the pharmacy or to seek medical help. No dog walking, no jogging, no food delivery services. Only essential workers are exempt, and that list is small. When President Cyril Ramaphosa made the announcement on March 23, a week after shutting the nation’s schools, there were only 402 confirmed COVID-19 cases. But it was essential, he said, to “flatten the curve” before widespread outbreaks overwhelmed the country’s fragile medical sys...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
By Polly Dunford, President and Chief Executive OfficerMarch 26, 2020Today, asCOVID-19 continues to invade our thoughts and lives, my mind is on frontline health workers.They don’t have the option to work from home, as many of us are doing today. They’re on the front lines as I write this—in hospitals, clinics, and triage centers around the world—putting themselves at risk to stop this pandemic. Now, more than ever,health workers need our support.Last week, as I began my new job as president&CEO at IntraHealth International, I saw that our country and global teams had mobilized immediately to ...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Digital Health Health Workers Source Type: news
By Wayan Vota, Director of digital health Photo courtesy of ICTWorks.March 18, 2020Global coronavirus infections now exceed 200,000 confirmed cases in 144 countries, with over 8,205 deaths from COVID-19, leading to international travel bans and almost 40 conference cancellations across the international development industry.Donors like USAID, DFID, World Bank, and Gates Foundation are asking,“What global digital health solutions are available for international COVID response that can be implemented by government health systems in low- and middle-income countries? "We a...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases Digital Health Source Type: news
This article was originally published in International Politics and Society. Based in the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung’s Brussels office, International Politics and Society aims to bring the European political debate to a global audience, as well as providing a platform for voices from the Global South. The post Why Nigeria Knows Better How to Fight Corona Than the US appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Crystal Simeoni is currently the Economic Justice lead at FEMNET – one of Africa’s largest women’s rights networks where she leads a body of work that intersects pan-African feminist narra...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
by Fahima Chowdhury, Taufiqur Rahman Bhuiyan, Afroza Akter, Md Saruar Bhuiyan, Ashraful Islam Khan, Motaher Hossain, Imam Tauheed, Tasnuva Ahmed, Shaumik Islam, Tanzeem Ahmed Rafique, Shah Alam Siddique, Nabila Binta Harun, Khaleda Islam, John D. Clemens, Firdausi Qadri After the large influx of Rohingya nationals (termed Forcibly Displaced Myanmar National; FDMN) from Rakhine State of Myanmar to Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh, it was apparent that outbreaks of cholera was very likely in this setting where people were living under adverse water and sanitation condit ions. Large campaigns of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) wer...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract The epidemic diarrheal disease cholera is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae virulence factors include the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin, which are major factors responsible for host colonization and production of diarrhea. Expression of cholera toxin and TCP genes is controlled by the ToxR regulon. The ToxR regulon includes the transcriptional activators ToxR, TcpP, and ToxT. ToxT directly initiates transcription of the cholera toxin and TCP genes. TcpP and ToxR are necessary for expression of toxT. TcpP and ToxR activity requires TcpH and ToxS, respectiv...
Source: Archives of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Arch Microbiol Source Type: research
As the world grapples with a global health emergency that is COVID-19, many are drawing parallels with a pandemic of another infectious disease – influenza – that took the world by storm just over 100 years ago. We should hope against hope that this one isn’t as bad, but the 1918 flu had momentous long-term consequences – not least for the way countries deliver healthcare. Could COVID-19 do the same? The 1918 flu pandemic claimed at least 50 million lives, or 2.5 per cent of the global population, according to current estimates. It washed over the world in three waves. A relatively mild wave in the ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 health History ideas Source Type: news
[VOA] As the coronavirus spreads globally, Zimbabwe says it is ready for the infection, despite a struggling health care sector and collapsing economy.Describing the coronavirus as a "catastrophe which waits us," Zimbabwe's Health Minister Obediah Moyo told journalists Monday that the country had learned from previous cholera epidemics and are prepared to tackle the virus, also known as COVID-19.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Forecasting the spatiotemporal spread of infectious diseases during an outbreak is an important component of epidemic response. However, it remains challenging both methodologically and with respect to data requirements, as disease spread is influenced by numerous factors, including the pathogen’s underlying transmission parameters and epidemiological dynamics, social networks and population...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
Pandemics of influenza, cholera, and plague are part of global history. Regional epidemics and pandemics of infectious diseases, primarily influenza A, continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality while remaining unpredictable in nature. Sudden-on...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news
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