Historical case studies on pandemics
(Kiel University) Whether it's the plague, cholera or currently COVID-19: epidemics are part of human history. Long before there were vaccinations or microscopes for the investigation of pathogens, societies had to develop coping strategies. These are described in the brochure 'Distant Times so Close: Pandemics and Crises reloaded', which is the first in a series of historical-archaeological publications on current topics published by the Cluster of Excellence 'ROOTS - Social, Environmental, and Cultural Connectivity in Past Societies' at Kiel University (CAU). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 4, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How Data Visualization During Public Health Crises Has Saved Lives for Centuries
When publicized far and wide enough, infographics, some experts argue, can save lives. The communicative value in visualizing data towards improving public health outcomes is long-established, going back over two centuries. And while the earliest examples were intended to inform discussion and debate among an elite social sphere, they also sought to address real-world problems. From 1820 to 1830, an enthusiasm for statistics began to emerge across the western world, leading to an era of statistics concerned with reform. It was led by individuals who sought to disrupt what they saw as the chaos of politics and replace it wi...
Source: TIME: Health - August 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Murray Dick / The MIT Press Reader Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 health Public Health syndication Source Type: news

What We Don ’t Know About COVID-19 Can Hurt Us
Countries around the world have introduced stringent control measures to stop COVID-19 outbreaks growing, but now many find themselves facing the same situation again. From Melbourne to Miami, the relaxation of measures had led to increasing flare-ups, which in some places has already meant reclosing schools, businesses or travel routes. Within the U.S. and among different countries, places with wildly varying public-health policies have experienced wildly diverse outcomes. Most ominously, infections are rising rapidly in many places where they once were falling. So how do countries avoid an indefinite, unsustainable, cycl...
Source: TIME: Health - August 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Kucharski Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Microbiome confers resistance to cholera
(University of California - Riverside) Many parts of the world are in the midst of a deadly pandemic of cholera, an extreme form of watery diarrhea. UC Riverside scientists have discovered specific gut bacteria make some people resistant to it -- a finding that could save lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opinion: Look to Cholera Vaccine Campaigns for COVID-19 Guidance
Accounting for a limited stockpile of cholera vaccine can provide insight into the most effective way to distribute future COVID-19 vaccines. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 15, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Human and Societal Behaviour: How Pandemics Have Shaped Them
Left: German Ambassador to Singapore Ulrich Sante and Foreign Minister Vivian Balakrishnan at the official opening of the German European School Singapore on Sept 13, 2018. Dr Sante says he will be leaving Singapore with a heavy heart but also a treasure trove of good memories. PHOTO: GERMAN EUROPEAN SCHOOL SINGAPOREBy Dr. Iftekhar Ahmed ChowdhurySINGAPORE, Jun 15 2020 (IPS-Partners) The departing German envoy in Singapore, Ambassador Ulrich Sante, in a recent published article in the Straits Times shared some of his thoughts with the readership including on the impact on the community of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Among other...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury Tags: Economy & Trade Health Source Type: news

Slowing the Coronavirus Is Speeding the Spread of Other Diseases
Many mass immunization efforts worldwide were halted this spring to prevent spread of the virus at crowded inoculation sites. The consequences have been alarming. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jan Hoffman and Ruth Maclean Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Vaccination and Immunization Measles Poliomyelitis Cholera Congo, Democratic Republic of (Congo-Kinshasa) your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

What is lost in the smoke of COVID-19
Devyn Holliday, Research Officer, Economic, Youth & Sustainable Development Directorate   This blog is part of the seminar series on ‘The Economics of COVID-19’.By Devyn HollidayJun 10 2020 (IPS-Partners) When countries shuttered their shops, closed their markets, and cordoned off places of gathering to help ward off the coronavirus, they did so out of immediate concern for the health and wellbeing of their citizens. However, as these measures endure the virus is no longer the sole threat to the health and wellbeing of citizens. People across the globe are facing mounting threats to their wellbeing ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Devyn Holliday Tags: Economy & Trade Health Labour Source Type: news

Africa: Africa's COVID-19 Resilience Must Not Lead to Complacency
[Chatham House] Africa is confounding predictions of a COVID-19 apocalypse, but widespread anxiety remains. Valuable lessons must be taken forward from the successful national responses so far across public health, security, and the economy. COVID-19 responses across Africa built on lessons learned from combatting infectious diseases such as cholera and tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and Ebola, using World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines tailored to local demands. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 8, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Donors pledge $8.8bn for global vaccination programmes
Support is projected to save up to 8m lives from diseases such as measles and cholera (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - June 4, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

DRC has seen epidemics before, but Covid-19's toll on older people leaves me sleepless
Many of the people I support in Kinshasa have no money, no soap, no water – and when they are struggling to breathe, no ventilatorsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWe ’re used to emergencies and people dying in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, whether it’s a result of the long-runningconflict or Ebola, cholera and malaria. But coronavirus has knocked us for six, because it has affected people we are very close to.I ’ve been working in development for decades, but I have to admit I have shed tears these past few weeks.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Anatole Bandu Tags: Global development Democratic Republic of the Congo Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science World news Africa Source Type: news

How data analysis helped Mozambique stem a cholera outbreak
Silicon Valley start-up Zenysis drafted in to help authorities tackle disease (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - May 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cholera Fast Facts
Read CNN's Fast Facts about cholera and learn more about the acute diarrheal infection. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Vaccine Against COVID-19 Would Be the Latest Success in a Long Scientific History
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - May 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news

New Resource for Spotting COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories
The COVID-19 pandemic provides fertile ground for the emergence and spread of new conspiracy theories, often with significant negative implications for public health and well-being. A new resource has been developed by experts in communications and the spread of misinformation to help people spot and respond to conspiracy theories. "How to Spot COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories," was developed by Stephan Lewandowsky, John Cook, Ullrich Ecker, and Sander van der Linden. According to the authors: "When people suffer a loss of control or feel threatened, they become more vulnerable to believing conspiracies....
Source: AIBS News - May 11, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

New Resource for Spotting COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories
The COVID-19 pandemic provides fertile ground for the emergence and spread of new conspiracy theories, often with significant negative implications for public health and well-being. A new resource has been developed by experts in communications and the spread of misinformation to help people spot and respond to conspiracy theories. “How to Spot COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories,” was developed by Stephan Lewandowsky, John Cook, Ullrich Ecker, and Sander van der Linden. According to the authors: “When people suffer a loss of control or feel threatened, they become more vulnerable to believing conspiracies. ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 11, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Time for the World Bank and IMF to Be the Solution, Not the Problem
Franciscka Lucien is Executive Director of the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti. Joel Curtain is the Director of Advocacy at Partners in Health.By Franciscka Lucien and Joel CurtainPORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti and BOSTON, May 7 2020 (IPS) The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) have a historic opportunity to help stabilize a world reeling from COVID-19. Doing so will require the institutions to change course and aggressively support poor countries’ ability to invest broadly in the government services their populations need. The pandemic is exposing the consequences of four decades of reduced ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Franciscka Lucien and Joel Curtain Tags: Aid Economy & Trade Education Financial Crisis Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Polio, Measles Outbreaks ‘Inevitable’, Say Vaccine Experts
A young boy in Pakistan receives an oral polio vaccine (OPV). Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Laura MackenzieMay 6 2020 (IPS) Interruptions to vaccination programmes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic could result in new waves of measles or polio outbreaks, health experts warn. A growing number of one-off immunisation campaigns and national routine vaccine introductions are being delayed amid social distancing and other measures to curb the spread of SARS-CoV-2, leaving millions unprotected. With both preventive campaigns and routine immunisations impacted, “we’ll have an increasing number of children who will becom...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Laura Mackenzie Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Cholera Outbreak --- Zimbabwe, September 2018--March 2019
A 2018 cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe underscored the importance of community-wide water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions, as well as vaccination and outbreak detection in reducing cholera's impact. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - April 30, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: Cholera (Vibrio cholerae) MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Outbreaks Source Type: news

Dr. Larry Brilliant and Dr. Leana Wen on How We Need to Prepare for the Next Pandemic
This article is part of #TIME100Talks: Finding Hope, a special series featuring leaders across different fields sharing their ideas for navigating the pandemic. Want more? Sign up for access to more virtual events, including live conversations with influential newsmakers. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME 100 TIME100 Talks video Source Type: news

Cholera studies reveal mechanisms of biofilm formation and hyperinfectivity
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Free-swimming cholera bacteria are much less infectious than bacteria in biofilms, aggregates of bacterial cells that form on surfaces. This accounts for the surprising effectiveness of filtering water through cloth, such as a folded sari, which can reduce infections dramatically in places where the disease is endemic, despite the fact that individual cholera bacteria easily pass through such a filter. A new study goes a long way toward explaining the hyperinfectivity of cholera biofilms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Coronavirus could erode global fight against other diseases
As the world focuses on the pandemic, experts fear losing ground in the long fight against other infectious diseases like AIDS, tuberculosis and cholera that kill millions every year. Also at risk are decades-long efforts that allowed the World Health Organization to set target dates for eradicating malaria, polio and other illnesses. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - April 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tanzania: Don't Forget Cholera, Malaria, Zanzibar Residents Told
[Daily News] AS Zanzibar, just like other parts of Tanzania, continues to receive heavy rains, residents have been reminded that malaria and cholera still pose public health concern and economic threat. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - April 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Elimination: what New Zealand's coronavirus response can teach the world | Michael Baker and Nick Wilson
New Zealand ’s drive against Covid-19 is showing promise and it is not too late for other countries to followEpidemiologists love to evoke the memory of John Snow, who famously advocated removing the handle from the Broad Street pump in London, an action that helped toend a severe outbreak of cholera. In the face of the Covid-19 pandemic we need to take the same kind of decisive action, yet western countries have appeared remarkably slow to do so, despite the advantages of immense scientific knowledge and modern tools of pandemic control.New Zealand now appears to be the only “western” nation following an...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Michael Baker and Nick Wilson Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Science New Zealand Asia Pacific Australia news Jacinda Ardern New Zealand politics Source Type: news

Few Doctors, Fewer Ventilators: African Countries Fear They Are Defenseless Against Inevitable Spread of Coronavirus
Zororo Makamba wasn’t supposed to die of the novel coronavirus. Not just because of his age, which at 30 placed him well out of the at-risk category for COVID-19 complications, but because of who he was. A well-known, pro-government media personality in Zimbabwe, and the son of a prominent business mogul, Makamba had the wealth and the connections that should have guaranteed him the best care possible. Instead, on March 23, Zimbabwe’s first confirmed case of the coronavirus died alone in a quarantined hospital, three days after his diagnosis. Hospital staff, lacking protective equipment, were afraid to come nea...
Source: TIME: Health - April 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aryn Baker / Cape Town Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Coronavirus is shining a light on the wretched universal credit system | Daniel Lavelle
A million people, myself included, have turned to UC in Britain ’s lockdown. Now we will see the ordeals claimants face• Coronavirus latest updates• See all our coronavirus coverageBritish governments are notoriously bad at recognising a crisis until it impacts them, or their class, directly. London ’s pioneering sanitation system was not developed until the cholera epidemics of the early 19th century had reached parliament’s windows, with the“Great Stink” wafting in from the Thames. Similarly, now that the middle classes are sharing the same unemployment line as the people who serve...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Lavelle Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science World news Universal credit Society Benefits UK news Welfare Politics Austerity Economics Business Source Type: news

Nigeria: COVID-19 a New Threat for 1.5 Million Internally Displaced People in Borno State
[MSF] After more than a decade of armed conflict, outbreaks of severe malnutrition, malaria, measles and cholera, approximately 1.5 million internally displaced people (IDPs) in Borno state now face the spectre of COVID-19. Many live in vastly overcrowded camps with poor water and sanitation facilities, limited supplies of hygiene essentials such as soap and water, and often no individual space at all. Functioning health infrastructure in Borno is scarce, and the capacity to refer patients is extremely limited. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 3, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Congo-Kinshasa: Children in the DR Congo at Risk From Killer Measles, Cholera Epidemics - UNICEF
[Unicef] The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)'s battered healthcare system needs urgent support as it struggles with measles and cholera epidemics that kill thousands of children, as well as the mounting threat from the coronavirus, COVID-19, says UNICEF. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 1, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus poses latest threat to battered health system in DR Congo
The looming threat of the new coronavirus disease COVID-19 is just the latest challenge to the beleaguered health care system in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which is struggling with deadly measles and cholera epidemics that have killed thousands of children over the past year, the UN children’s fund (UNICEF) said on Tuesday. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - March 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Key Messages: Epidemics, Pandemics and Humanitarian Challenges: Lessons from a Number of Health Crises
Source: Groupe URD (Urgence R éhabilitation Développement). Published: 3/29/2020. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, this 40-page report brings together the lessons from work on major health crises, humanitarian response, and crisis management so that they can be shared. It discusses how health systems react to crises, whether it be in terms of war and disaster medicine, regular public health systems, or the management of major health crises, such as cholera and Ebola. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

I ’ve Seen Wars and Epidemics Unfold. But Now That I Have an Immunocompromised Partner, the Coronavirus Makes Me Truly Scared
At midnight on Thursday March 26, all of South Africa went into lockdown. For the next 21 days, no one is to leave their homes unless they are going to the grocery store, the pharmacy or to seek medical help. No dog walking, no jogging, no food delivery services. Only essential workers are exempt, and that list is small. When President Cyril Ramaphosa made the announcement on March 23, a week after shutting the nation’s schools, there were only 402 confirmed COVID-19 cases. But it was essential, he said, to “flatten the curve” before widespread outbreaks overwhelmed the country’s fragile medical sys...
Source: TIME: Health - March 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aryn Baker Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news

We ’re Moving Fast to Help Health Workers Worldwide Combat COVID-19
By Polly Dunford, President and Chief Executive OfficerMarch 26, 2020Today, asCOVID-19 continues to invade our thoughts and lives, my mind is on frontline health workers.They don’t have the option to work from home, as many of us are doing today. They’re on the front lines as I write this—in hospitals, clinics, and triage centers around the world—putting themselves at risk to stop this pandemic. Now, more than ever,health workers need our support.Last week, as I began my new job as president& CEO at IntraHealth International, I saw that our country and global teams had mobilized immediately to...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: COVID-19 Digital Health Health Workers Source Type: news

COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan
By PRESS RELEASEMar 25 2020 (IPS-Partners) A global approach is the only way to fight COVID-19, the UN says as it launches humanitarian response plan • UN humanitarian chief warns that failing to help vulnerable countries fight the coronavirus now could place millions at risk and leave the virus free to circle back around the globe. • UN launches US$2 billion global humanitarian response to fight COVID-19 across South America, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. • Governments urged to commit to fully supporting the global humanitarian response plan, while sustaining funding to existing humanitarian appeals. U...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: PRESS RELEASE Tags: Health Humanitarian Emergencies Source Type: news

10 Global Digital Health Solutions for International Coronavirus Response
By Wayan Vota, Director of digital health Photo courtesy of ICTWorks.March 18, 2020Global coronavirus infections now exceed 200,000 confirmed cases in 144 countries, with over 8,205 deaths from COVID-19, leading to international travel bans and almost 40 conference cancellations across the international development industry.Donors like USAID, DFID, World Bank, and Gates Foundation are asking,“What global digital health solutions are available for international COVID response that can be implemented by government health systems in low- and middle-income countries? "We a...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: cbishopp Tags: Infectious Diseases Digital Health Source Type: news

Why Nigeria Knows Better How to Fight Corona Than the US
This article was originally published in International Politics and Society. Based in the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung’s Brussels office, International Politics and Society aims to bring the European political debate to a global audience, as well as providing a platform for voices from the Global South. The post Why Nigeria Knows Better How to Fight Corona Than the US appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Crystal Simeoni is currently the Economic Justice lead at FEMNET – one of Africa’s largest women’s rights networks where she leads a body of work that intersects pan-African feminist narra...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Crystal Simeoni Tags: Africa Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

The World Changed Its Approach to Health After the 1918 Flu. Will It After The COVID-19 Outbreak?
As the world grapples with a global health emergency that is COVID-19, many are drawing parallels with a pandemic of another infectious disease – influenza – that took the world by storm just over 100 years ago. We should hope against hope that this one isn’t as bad, but the 1918 flu had momentous long-term consequences – not least for the way countries deliver healthcare. Could COVID-19 do the same? The 1918 flu pandemic claimed at least 50 million lives, or 2.5 per cent of the global population, according to current estimates. It washed over the world in three waves. A relatively mild wave in the ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 health History ideas Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Govt Says '100 Percent' Prepared For Coronavirus
[VOA] As the coronavirus spreads globally, Zimbabwe says it is ready for the infection, despite a struggling health care sector and collapsing economy.Describing the coronavirus as a "catastrophe which waits us," Zimbabwe's Health Minister Obediah Moyo told journalists Monday that the country had learned from previous cholera epidemics and are prepared to tackle the virus, also known as COVID-19. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 4, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Mozambique: Cholera in Three Cabo Delgado Districts
[AIM] Maputo -The Mozambican health authorities have declared a cholera outbreak in three districts in the northern province of Cabo Delgado - namely Macomia, Mocimboa da Praia and Ibo. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 25, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Legal Authorities for Isolation and Quarantine
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC OID). Published: 2/24/2020. This resource, updated on February 24, 2020, provides information about legal authorities for isolation and quarantine, which are public health practices used to stop or limit the spread of disease. Federal isolation and quarantine are authorized for these communicable diseases: Cholera, diphtheria, infectious tuberculosis, plague, smallpox, yellow fever, viral hemorrhagic fevers (including Ebola), severe acute respiratory syndromes, and flu that can cause a pandemic. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Gu...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mozambique: MSF Improving Healthcare in Remote and Conflict-Ridden Northern Mozambique
[MSF] MSF has been providing healthcare in Cabo Delgado province, one of the poorest and most isolated regions of Mozambique, since February 2019. Early activities were rapidly disrupted by Cyclone Kenneth in late April 2019, and replaced with emergency response to displacement and cholera. Since then, MSF has been building up healthcare activities. Bruno Cardoso, MSF's project coordinator, has just returned from Mozambique and tells us more about the situation and what MSF does there. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 17, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Pandemics, regional outbreaks, and sudden-onset disasters - Gully PR.
Pandemics of influenza, cholera, and plague are part of global history. Regional epidemics and pandemics of infectious diseases, primarily influenza A, continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality while remaining unpredictable in nature. Sudden-on... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

Rapid Response Toolbox
Source: Medical Mission Institute. Published: 2/2020. This toolbox, updated in February 2020, provides information and materials about rapid response to diseases and outbreaks, including situation reports about COVID-19 (coronavirus disease), plague, cholera, Marburg Virus, and Yellow Fever. It provide clinical guidelines, including for COVID-19,chikungunya, dengue, Ebola, and Zika; information about communication and training; and prevention and control information. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EU Panel Backs Cholera Vaccine Vaxchora for Adults, Children EU Panel Backs Cholera Vaccine Vaxchora for Adults, Children
The European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use recommended marketing authorization for Vaxchora recombinant, live, oral cholera vaccine.International Approvals (Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines - January 31, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Infectious Diseases News Alert Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Harare, Cassava Allay Cholera Fears
[Zimbabwe Standard] Harare City Council and Clean City, a subsidiary of smart digital technology provider Cassava Smartech, which is part of the Econet Group, have moved in to ensure that no fresh outbreak of cholera occurs in the capital after entering into a partnership targeting suburbs vulnerable to waterborne diseases. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 27, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Haiti cholera outbreak ‘stopped in its tracks’
After a nine-year long cholera outbreak in Haiti that killed close to 10,000 people, this week the country reached the milestone of an entire year free from any new cases of the deadly waterborne disease. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Somalia: 145 Cases of Suspected Cholera Reported
[Dalsan Radio] The Ministry of Health of Somalia has announced 145 new suspected cases of cholera, with one death reported, for epidemiological week 2 (6-12 January 2020). The cumulative total number of suspected cholera cases since the beginning of this outbreak is 10 113, including 51 associated deaths. So far in 2020, active transmission has been reported from Banadir and Lower Shebelle regions. Of the 145 cases reported during this week, 79% of the cases (114) are children under 5 years of age. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 21, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Ebola and Cholera Epidemics: An ALNAP Lessons Paper
Source: Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action (ALNAP). Published: 1/17/2020. This 41-page paper aims to inform future humanitarian responses to epidemics or in contexts of an epidemic by drawing lessons for humanitarian practitioners from the responses to Ebola and cholera epidemics since 2010. It details nine lessons to limit the number of cases and deaths, and three lessons to limit the spillover effects of epidemics. It discusses how epidemics are happening more frequently and taking more lives in contexts where humanitarian actors operate. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resour...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why cholera is noninflammatory
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: VanHook, A. M. Tags: twis Source Type: news