The Emergency Department Diagnosis and Management of Urinary Tract Infection.

The Emergency Department Diagnosis and Management of Urinary Tract Infection. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2018 Nov;36(4):685-710 Authors: Long B, Koyfman A Abstract Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection seen in the emergency department. The spectrum of UTI includes simple versus complicated infection and lower versus upper UTI. No one history or examination finding is definitive for diagnosis. Testing often includes urinalysis and/or urine dipstick, and several pitfalls may occur in interpretation. Urine cultures should be obtained in complicated or upper UTIs but not simple and lower tract UTIs, unless a patient is pregnant. Imaging often is not required. Most patients with simple cystitis and pyelonephritis are treated as outpatients. A variety of potentially dangerous conditions may mimic UTI and pyelonephritis. PMID: 30296999 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Emerg Med Clin North Am Source Type: research

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ConclusionsThis is the first randomised investigation of BP self-monitoring for the management of pregnancy hypertension and indicates that a large RCT would be feasible.
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Jaspreet Dhanda, James Gray, Ellen Knox, Amreen Bashir
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
In the original publication of this article [1], there are error in the Fig.  5, the “ml” should be replaced by “mL” (Fig. 5A) and “IFNγ” should be “IFN-γ” in Fig. 5A, B. The correct figure is below:
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection seen in the emergency department. The spectrum of UTI includes simple versus complicated infection and lower versus upper UTI. No one history or examination finding is definitive for diagnosis. Testing often includes urinalysis and/or urine dipstick, and several pitfalls may occur in interpretation. Urine cultures should be obtained in complicated or upper UTIs but not simple and lower tract UTIs, unless a patient is pregnant. Imaging often is not required. Most patients with simple cystitis and pyelonephritis are treated as outpatients. A variety of potentially dangerous...
Source: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Kalinderi K, Delkos D, Kalinderis M, Athanasiadis A, Kalogiannidis I Abstract Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infection in pregnancy, increasing the risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Urinary tract infections may present as asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis or pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen associated with both symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria. If asymptomatic bacteriuria is untreated, up to 30% of mothers develop acute pyelonephritis, with an increased risk of multiple maternal and neonatal complications, such a...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
ConclusionWithin the current limited evidence, the decision regarding SNM activation or deactivation should be individualized. A registry for those patients is recommended.
Source: International Urogynecology Journal - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Abstract The most common cause of acute dysuria is infection, especially cystitis. Other infectious causes include urethritis, sexually transmitted infections, and vaginitis. Noninfectious inflammatory causes include a foreign body in the urinary tract and dermatologic conditions. Noninflammatory causes of dysuria include medication use, urethral anatomic abnormalities, local trauma, and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. An initial targeted history includes features of a local cause (e.g., vaginal or urethral irritation), risk factors for a complicated urinary tract infection (e.g., male sex, pregnancy,...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
Abstract Bacteriuria during pregnancy may be classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria, infections of the lower urinary tract (cystitis), or infections of the upper urinary tract (pyelonephritis). Lower tract bacteriuria is associated with an increased risk of developing pyelonephritis in pregnancy, which is itself associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Pregnant women should be screened for the presence of bacteriuria early in pregnancy. All bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated, and antimicrobial choice in pregnancy should reflect safety for both the mother and the fetus. After treatment of bacter...
Source: The Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Urol Clin North Am Source Type: research
Bacteriuria during pregnancy may be classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria, infections of the lower urinary tract (cystitis), or infections of the upper urinary tract (pyelonephritis). Lower tract bacteriuria is associated with an increased risk of developing pyelonephritis in pregnancy, which is itself associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Pregnant women should be screened for the presence of bacteriuria early in pregnancy. All bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated, and antimicrobial choice in pregnancy should reflect safety for both the mother and the fetus. After treatment of bacteriuria, patients sh...
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Receiving an adequate antibiotic regimen for a UTI is important to prevent treatment failure and the emergence of resistant organisms. Overall, the studied antibiotic regimens prescribed for various UTIs diagnosed in the clinic did not align with the IDSA recommendations. PMID: 25972219 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Southern Medical Journal - Category: Journals (General) Tags: South Med J Source Type: research
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