Speech Therapy as Treatment for Supragastric Belching

AbstractThe purpose of this study was to describe a newly developed speech therapy program as an innovating therapeutic approach and to assess the results of this intervention in patients with supragastric belching. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered data from 73 patients with supragastric belching who were treated with speech therapy between 2007 and 2017. Of these, 48 were included for evaluation of therapy. Thirty patients had supragastric belching proven by 24-h impedance measurements. Eighteen patients were diagnosed by an experienced speech language pathologist as having supragastric belching according to precise criteria. Speech therapy consists of explanation, creating awareness of esophageal air influx and exercises to discontinue the supragastric belching mechanism. Therapy effect was measured by comparing visual analogue scale (VAS) scores on belching and related symptoms. The median symptom duration at the start of therapy was 2  years. Supragastric belching symptoms decreased significantly with a total median VAS score of 406 (291–463) prior to treatment and a median VAS score of 125 (17–197) following treatment. Forty patients (83%) had a sufficient to major result with a median therapy duration of 3 months and ten sessions. Speech therapy was an effective treatment in the majority of patients with supragastric belching.
Source: Dysphagia - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

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Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Advocacy Audiology News Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: blogs
Purpose The purpose of this introduction is to provide an overview of the articles in this special issue ofAJSLP. These articles originated from the presentations at the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference in September 2017.
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions The role of parents is key in modeling resilient responses to children and creating a resilience-rich environment. As children who stutter may be more vulnerable to adversity, some may benefit from targeted support to build their resilience, in order to enhance their ability to overcome challenges and thrive.
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusion Desensitization activities can be implemented with parents of CWS to help them recognize and manage their emotional reactions to their child's stuttering, to support parents to feel knowledgeable and confident in managing their child's stuttering, and ultimately to enhance the child's progress in therapy.
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions Although a nascent field, MBIs may be useful as a part of therapy for children and adolescents who stutter. The concepts highlighted by MBIs may also help to resolve some clinical issues.
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions Participants identified a range of outcomes that were important to achieve as a result of speech and language therapy. The findings suggest a need for a more holistic view of what is meant by successful therapy, incorporating improvements in the ability to communicate and participate in daily situations. The findings suggest that an integrated or holistic approach to intervention would be required to achieve these goals and should include significant others from the child's environment. The important statements identified in this study could be used to inform the content of therapy and to evaluate change over t...
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions The findings point to the importance of considering the environment, including significant relationships and social structures, in our understanding of stuttering. They also provide insights regarding intrapersonal and interpersonal processes, which can influence the development of stuttering or pave the way to stuttering becoming less problematic for the person who stutters.
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusion Although research recognizes that the experience of the stuttering disorder involves more than just speech behaviors, people who stutter experience stuttering behaviors in time as involving more than just the disruption in speech. This finding has implications for both the theoretical understanding of stuttering and the clinical evaluation and treatment of the stuttering disorder.
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions This experimental study demonstrated that it is possible to positively modify stuttering attitudes of teachers as well as university students. It has implications for the length, content, and experiential components of interventions designed to improve public attitudes toward stuttering.
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions The results demonstrate that, over a year, children who attend a course of Palin Parent –Child Interaction show reduced stuttering frequency and a more positive attitude to speech. In addition, parents observe these improvements in the child, feel more confident in managing the stuttering, and are less worried about it. The different times at which specific variables significantly im proved provides insight to a process of change over time. Results suggest that parents' ability to notice positive change in fluency and the impact that these observations have on both the child and the family are linked to t...
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
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