food allergy and anaphylaxis.

[FOOD ALLERGY AND ANAPHYLAXIS]. Arerugi. 2018;67(1):1-7 Authors: Miura K PMID: 29459519 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Allergology International - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Arerugi Source Type: research

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Jared Huston, MD, a trauma surgeon at Northwell Health on New York's Long Island, spoke straight to the point about the current state of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. While traumatic wounds to extremities can be treated with a tourniquet, such wounds suffered internally are often fatal unless the patient can be transported quickly to an operating room. "There are no efficacious approaches to treating noncompressible hemorrhage," Huston said. "That's really the problem. If you're injured intra-abdominally or in the chest, and you're not brought somewhere where a trauma surgeon can operate on you and stop t...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Electronics Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Samantha Platt, Scott H. Sicherer
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
We report a case of an 8-year-old boy who developed a cochineal allergy.Current disease history: He has been suffering from atopic dermatitis, bronchial asthma, and food allergies since childhood. At the age of seven, he experienced an unknown anaphylaxis reaction twice. When he was 8 years old, he ate a frankfurter containing hypoallergenic cochineal for the first time; cold sweat, intraoral discomfort, respiratory distress, and urticaria appeared throughout the body. His skin prick tests were positive, with a result of 2+to frankfurter and cochineal dyes (color value 0.1 and 0.01). In the immunoblot assay, binding of IgE...
Source: Arerugi - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Arerugi Source Type: research
Deaths due to food allergy are incredibly rare (1), but it is now understood that food is the most commonly identified trigger of anaphylaxis (2). In the United States, deaths from food anaphylaxis are broadly estimated to occur at a rate of 5-200 cases per year (3).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Perspective Source Type: research
ConclusionThis study demonstrates that an AA ‐based diet can at least partially prevent allergic symptoms of CMA in mice. Differences in FoxP3+ cell counts and serum levels of IgG2a and IgG1 may suggest enhanced anti ‐inflammatory and tolerizing capacities in AA‐fed mice. This, combined with the absence of effects in sham‐sensitized mice indicates that AAFs for the prevention of food allergies may be an interesting concept that warrants further research.
Source: Immunity, Inflammation and Disease - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Tree nut allergy remains an understudied area of food allergy research with limited region specific studies based on robust food allergy measures in population cohorts with longitudinal follow up. This currently limits our understanding of tree nut allergy prognosis. PMID: 32044450 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Abstract Inotodiol is a lanostane triterpenoid found only in Chaga mushroom. In the previous study investigating anti-allergic effects of fractionated Chaga mushroom extracts, we have found evidence that purified inotodiol holds an activity to suppress the mast cell function in vivo. To address the therapeutic relevance of the finding, in this study, we investigated whether inotodiol could also alleviate allergy symptoms observed in a chicken ovalbumin (cOVA)-induced mouse model of food allergy. Like the crude 70% ethanol extract of Chaga mushroom (320 mg/kg), oral administration of inotodiol (20 mg/kg),...
Source: International Immunopharmacology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Int Immunopharmacol Source Type: research
(CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug to treat peanut allergies in children on Friday, following an advisory committee vote of approval in September. The drug, Palforzia, can be used for children between 4 and 17 years old. It’s designed to minimize the incidence and severity of a child’s allergic reaction to peanuts, as even a small amount of exposure can be harmful to children with the allergy. Children are left attempting to avoid exposure to peanuts to avoid reactions. Though that will continue to be necessary with Palforzia, the risk of a reaction will be lessened, says ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Peanut Allergy Source Type: news
This article provides highlights of the clinically impactful original studies and reviews published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice in 2019 on the subjects of anaphylaxis, asthma, dermatitis, drug allergy, food allergy, immunodeficiency, immunotherapy, rhinitis/sinusitis, and urticaria/angioedema/mast cell disorders. Within each topic, practical aspects of diagnosis and management are emphasized. Treatments discussed include lifestyle modifications, allergen avoidance therapy, positive and negative effects of pharmacologic therapy, and various forms of immunologic and desensitization manageme...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Cow's milk (CM) is a common allergen present in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergy in children. The management of CM allergy (CMA) requires the replacement of milk protein with alternative protein and calcium sources. Extensively hydrolyzed formulas (eHFs) are alternative, hypoallergenic formulas that are recommended as standards for children with CMA.1 IgE-mediated immediate reactions to eHFs, such as life-threatening anaphylaxis, rarely occur.2 Patients with hyperresponsiveness to eHFs may be at a high risk because they are on a complete elimination diet.
Source: Pediatrics and Neonatology - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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