Impact of BMI on Open Ventral Hernia Repair Impact of BMI on Open Ventral Hernia Repair

Dr Lowenfels comments on a study examining the relationship between obesity and complications after open ventral hernia repair, published in Surgery.Medscape General Surgery
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: General Surgery Viewpoint Source Type: news

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We aimed to assess the impact of modifiable comorbidities —obesity, diabetes, and smoking—and their aggregate effect on wound complications after incisional hernia repair.
Source: Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionWe present a case report of inguinal bladder hernia in a middle-aged man that presented as left lower quadrant pain, groin pain, and dysuria. Diagnosis was confirmed preoperatively with radiographic imaging. The hernia was surgically reduced and the defect repaired without complications.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsExhortations for pre-operative and post-operative weight management are not often successful or sustainable, implying a need for individualized holistic approaches.
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeBody mass index (BMI)  ≥ 35 kg/m2 is a known independent risk factor for complications following open ventral hernia repair (VHR). We sought to examine the relationship between BMI and minimally invasive VHR.MethodsThe ACS-NSQIP database was queried for all patients age  ≥ 18 years undergoing minimally invasive VHR (2005–2015). Patients were stratified into seven BMI classes: underweight (BMI   30 kg/m2. When stratified by BMI class, we found significant differences in age, gender, race, comorbidities, and pre-operative characteristics acro...
Source: Hernia - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Exercise and weight loss are recommended for patients with obesity undergoing elective complex ventral hernia repair (cVHR).
Source: American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsIPOM for the general surgeon is a relatively safe and effective method of repairing ventral hernias, with a low recurrence rate.
Source: Irish Journal of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionsIPOM for the general surgeon is a relatively safe and effective method of repairing ventral hernias, with a low recurrence rate.
Source: Irish Journal of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions: The addition of a panniculectomy to ventral hernia repair increases surgical-site occurrences but does not increase complications that require an intervention. As such, ventral hernia repair with concurrent panniculectomy can be considered in obese patients with a symptomatic panniculus who wish to have a single-stage operation and the lifestyle benefits of a panniculectomy. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, III.
Source: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Reconstructive: Trunk: Original Articles Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Reconstructive: Trunk: Original Articles Source Type: research
In this study, we investigate the viability of complex ventral hernia repair with epigastric artery perforator sparing skin incisions, component separation, and wide-spanning retrorectus mesh reinforcement for patients with BMI of greater than or equal to 40 kg/m2 (class III obesity). Methods A single surgeon retrospective review of our prospectively maintained database was performed. We restricted this data to class III morbidly obese patients undergoing open VHR with component muscle separation and wide-spanning mesh reinforcement. Results Between 2010 and 2017, 131 patients met the inclusion criteria for our study...
Source: Annals of Plastic Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Reconstructive Surgery Source Type: research
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