Lung Ultrasound for Cardiogenic Shock in VA-ECMO

Publication date: Available online 14 October 2017 Source:Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition) Author(s): Javier Rodríguez-Fanjul, Julio Moreno Hernando, Joan Sánchez-de-Toledo
Source: Revista Espanola de Cardiologia - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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This is written by Brooks Walsh.https://twitter.com/BrooksWalshA 30 year-old woman was brought to the ED with chest pain.It had started just after nursing her newborn, about an hour prior, and she described it as a severe non-pleuritic “pressure” radiating to the back.She had given birth a week ago, and she had similar chest pain during her labor. She attributed the chest pain to anxiety and stress, saying " I'm just an anxious person. "A CXR and a CTA for PE were normal.The ECGsAn initial ECG was obtained as the pain was rapidly resolving:Minimal upsloping ST Elevation in III, with a steeply biphasic...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
This is by one of ouroutstanding 3rd year residents, Aaron Robinson, with some edits and comments by SmithEMS responded to a reported seizure in a 42 year old male. Per bystanders, he went down after some intense sporting activity, and had “shaking” type movement. He reports no personal or familial history of seizures.One of our EMS Fellows along with a Senior EM Resident were on duty that evening, and arrived on the scene with the Fire Department. When the physicians approached him, he was ashen, diaphoretic, and appeared in shock. Fire was able to obtain a BP of 60/palp and a pulse in the 40s. The physicians ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Abiomed, the maker of popular left ventricular assist devices, is releasing its newly FDA approved Impella CP with SmartAssist device. The pump features an optical sensor that physicians can use to position and reposition the device without relying o...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Radiology Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: This study highlights the role of point-of-care ultrasound (RUSH protocol) for early diagnosis of the shock etiology in emergency medicine department. Diagnosis using point-of-care ultrasound (RUSH protocol) significantly agreed with medical diagnosis. It showed good efficacy of point-of-care ultrasound (RUSH protocol) to differentiate causes of shock with good accuracy except distributive shock.
Source: Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
We present the case of a primigravid patient, who developed cardiogenic shock during the early postpartum period in the setting of retained placenta, uterine atony, and hemorrhage. Focused cardiac ultrasound played a central role in identifying the cause of hemodynamic instability. The decision to initiate venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was instrumental in the successful outcome for our patient, characterized by a full recovery without major neurological and cardiovascular sequelae.
Source: A&A Case Reports - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research
A 60-something presented with hypotension, bradycardia, chest pain and back pain.She had a h/o aortic aneurysm, aortic insufficiency, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension.  She had a mechanical aortic valve.  She was on anti-hypertensives including atenolol, and on coumadin, with an INR of 2.3. She was ill appearing.  BP was 70/49, pulse 60.A bedside echo showed good ejection fraction and normal right ventricle and no pericardial fluid. Here is the initial ECG:What do you think?This ECG actually looks like a left main occlusion (which rarely presents to the ED alive):  ST Elevation in...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Written by Pendell Meyers84 yo M with history of a “valve problem” presented for sudden onset chest pain and trouble breathing while eating lunch.He was sitting bolt upright, diaphoretic, tachypneic, with bilateral crackles. Although his BP was 126/84, he was in acute cardiogenic shock.Here is his initial ECG:Sinus tach with occasional PACs. Relatively normal QRS complex with diffuse significant ST depression including leads V2-V6, I, aVL, II, III, and aVF, with ST elevation in aVR. The vector of ST depression is maximal in leads V5 and II, consistent with diffuse subendocardial ischemia. There is no evidence o...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion of first report:In patients with anterior Killip class II or less ST-segment –elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, early intravenous metoprolol before reperfusion reduced infarct size and increased left ventricular ejection fraction with no excess of adverse events during the first 24 hours after STEMI.Conclusion of 2nd report: In patients with anterior Killip class  ≤II STEMI undergoing pPCI, early IV metoprolol before reperfusion resulted in higher long-term LVEF, reduced incidence of severe LV systolic dysfunction and ICD indications, and fe...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion:In hemodynamically stable patients with chest pain, sinus tachycardia aids in the identification of patients unlikely to have type I MI, especially in those with HR> 120 bpm.
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
One of our graduates, Rochelle Zarzar, who is now an education fellow, sent me this from one of the hospitals she works at now:An elderly woman presented with chest pain.  She had been nauseous the night before and did not feel well, then awoke 2 hours prior with chest pain.She had had a completely normal angiogram 3 months prior.Here is that angiogram report:The left main coronary artery is normal.Left anterior descending is a type 3 vessel and is normal.Left circumflex is nondominant and normal.The right coronary artery is dominant and normal.The nurses immediately recorded an ECG.  This was 2 hours after the o...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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