Jellybean 075 with Little Medic Aidan Baron

LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Government #FOAMed Warning; Life in the Fast Lane is apparently addictive. You have been warned. (It’s Jellybean 075 with Aidan Baron; @ALittleMedic ) Aidan Baron is not really that little when you meet him. He is quite big. If you do twitter you will have noticed this man before. I had doubts that he really existed. Was he something like Max Headroom or Ultron or Hobbs? No! He is a lovely man! He is a lovely man that has been enthusiastic about Para-medicine since, like, forever! Being a self confessed social media nerd he was way ahead of that curve when he stumbled upon all the #FOAMed fuss! He reached out to some of the people that he really admired, people like Cliff Reid (@cliffreid) and the rest is history. So lets get stuck in to some of his areas of interest because, basically, they are interesting. Even before paramedic training Aidan had a strong focus on ultrasound and #POCUS. He is a proper enthusiast too, he brought an ultrasound machine with him to Nepal just after he left school. Then it started to snow ball and ultrasound seems to have become a great partner in his training journey. The next thing you know he is writing a Masters on U/S and Paramedics. He is pushing paramedic research forward and using the SoMe skills he has gained to contribute. He has also recently spoken at the DFTB17 conferen...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: JellyBean aidan baron Source Type: blogs

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AbstractThe effect of a novel mentalization-based parenting intervention was explored on prenatal self-reported mentalization (P-PRFQ), attachment (MFAS), depression (EPDS) and anxiety (STAI) among women with substance use problems. The participants were 90 pregnant women referred to obstetric outpatient care due to recent or current substance use and randomized into intervention (n = 46) and control (n = 44) groups. The intervention group received three interactive 4D ultrasound sessions and a week-by-week pregnancy diary. The control condition was constituted of treatment-as-usual in obstetric...
Source: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
Wrapping up this year and looking back on the particularly interesting developments in medical technology, we at Medgadget are impressed and very excited about the future. We’re lucky to cover one of the most innovative fields of research and o...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
This study investigated in rats (male Sprague-Dawley rats) if aversive sounds modulate dopamine (DA) transmission in the mesolimbic reward system and cocaine reinforcement. For sound stimulation, we used artificial low-frequency ultrasound (ALFUS) in the frequency ranges (22 –38 kHz) which produces an aversive response in rats. Rats displayed increased anxiety-like behaviors, 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), and stress responses with ALFUS. In vivo extracellular recording and immunohistochemistry revealed that ALFUS stimulation activated central amygdalar neur ons and amygdalar GABAergic neurons. Amygdala...
Source: Molecular Neurobiology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA, MD Despite an area under the ROC curve of 1, Cassandra’s prophesies were never believed. She neither hedged nor relied on retrospective data – her predictions, such as the Trojan war, were prospectively validated. In medicine, a new type of Cassandra has emerged –  one who speaks in probabilistic tongue, forked unevenly between the probability of being right and the possibility of being wrong. One who, by conceding that she may be categorically wrong, is technically never wrong. We call these new Minervas “predictions.” The Owl of Minerva flies above its denominator. ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Data Medical Practice Physicians RogueRad @roguerad acute kidney injury AI deep learning machine learning predictions Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs
What would you do without your smartphone or laptop for a week? Some cannot even imagine putting them down for a second, not thinking much of the vulnerability of our entire digital existence. What if a hurricane destroys the electric grid? What if power supplies will get cut off by unstoppable rain? What about a future dystopic scenario with our traditional energy sources depleted due to overconsumption? And what if we just look at less fortunate parts of the world where stable electricity service is a rare treasure? We collected some examples of how medicine could become more independent from the traditional electricity ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Africa asia Caribbean development digital digital health Healthcare smartphone solar sustainability technology Source Type: blogs
Silvia Pregnolato1*, Elavazhagan Chakkarapani1, Anthony R. Isles2 and Karen Luyt1 1Department of Neonatal Neurology, Translational Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom 2Behavioural Genetics Group, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom Preterm birth complications are the leading cause of child death worldwide and a top global health priority. Among the survivors, the risk of life-long disabilities is high, including cerebral palsy and impairment of movement, cognition, and behavior. U...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Stroke is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the world. Besides the identified risk factor, Ischemic stroke evidence show drug use develops or exacerbates the atherosclerotic process. The current study aimed at comparing cerebrovascular ultrasounds ’ changes in addicted and nonaddicted people who developed ischemic stroke.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion This paper summarizes the current findings regarding the anti-colitis activity of plant-derived alkaloids and shows how these alkaloids exhibit significant and beneficial effects in alleviating colonic inflammation. These natural alkaloids are not only promising agents for IBD treatment but are also components for developing new wonder drugs. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms or toxicological evaluation of most plant-derived alkaloids still require much scientific research, and their actual efficacies for IBD patients have not been verified well in field research. Thus, further clinical trials to elu...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: There is little evidence about the effects of biomedical risk assessment as an aid for smoking cessation. The most promising results relate to spirometry and carotid ultrasound, where moderate-certainty evidence, limited by imprecision and risk of bias, did not detect a statistically significant benefit, but confidence intervals very narrowly missed one, and the point estimate favoured the intervention. A sensitivity analysis removing those studies at high risk of bias did detect a benefit. Moderate-certainty evidence limited by risk of bias did not detect an effect of feedback on smoking exposure by CO monito...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
The evolution of VR hardware and software What’s the best VR will do VR, AR, MR or spatial computing? The potential of interactive immersive reality Challenges and obstacles in adoption How will immersive reality transform everyday life? What was the last time you met sci-fi? The dark side of technology Imagine that a doctor sits down in Starbucks, places some glasses on his head, instantly invokes five screens and starts doing his diagnostic work. Robert Scoble, virtual reality expert, and tech evangelist believes that will be possible in the coming years – sooner than we might think. He told us why his wi...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Great Thinkers AR augmented reality future HoloLens Innovation MR Oculus technology virtual virtual reality VR XR Source Type: blogs
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