Can Omega-3s Reduce Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms?

Date: Wednesday, 01 18, 2017; Speaker: Yutaka MATSUOKA, M.D., Ph.D., National Cancer Center Japan, Division of Health Care Research, Center for Public Health Sciences; 5625 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD; 5th floor conference room
Source: NIH Calendar of Events - Category: American Health Source Type: events

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Condition:   Cancer Intervention:   Other: Survey to assess Post traumatic stress and anxiety at inclusion and 6 months later Sponsor:   Institut Paoli-Calmettes Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Cancer Intervention:   Other: Survey to assess Post traumatic stress and anxiety at inclusion and 6 months later Sponsor:   Institut Paoli-Calmettes Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
In conclusion, our results suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby the canonical NF-κB cascade and a mitochondrial fission pathway interdependently regulate endothelial inflammation. Lin28 as a Target for Nerve Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/05/lin28-as-a-target-for-nerve-regeneration/ Researchers here show that the gene Lin28 regulates axon regrowth. In mice, raised levels of Lin28 produce greater regeneration of nerve injuries. Past research has investigated Lin28 from the standpoint of producing a more general improvement in regenerative capacity. It improves mitoch...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Objective: To explore how oncology healthcare workers' (HCPs) personal experiences with suicide impacts their practice with cancer patients.Design: The study was designed using Grounded Theory strategies in data collection and analysis.Par...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
ke MA Abstract Chronic cancer-related symptoms (stress, fatigue, pain, depression, insomnia) may be linked with sympathetic nervous system over-activation and autonomic imbalance. Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of autonomic dysregulation that is commonly observed among cancer survivors. HRV biofeedback (HRVB) training induces HRV coherence, which maximizes HRV and facilitates autonomic and cardiorespiratory homeostasis. This randomized, wait-list-controlled, pilot intervention trial tested the hypothesis that HRVB can improve HRV coherence and alleviate cancer-related symptoms. The interven...
Source: Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback Source Type: research
AbstractChronic cancer-related symptoms (stress, fatigue, pain, depression, insomnia) may be linked with sympathetic nervous system over-activation and autonomic imbalance. Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of autonomic dysregulation that is commonly observed among cancer survivors. HRV biofeedback (HRVB) training induces HRV coherence, which maximizes HRV and facilitates autonomic and cardiorespiratory homeostasis. This randomized, wait-list-controlled, pilot intervention trial tested the hypothesis that HRVB can improve HRV coherence and alleviate cancer-related symptoms. The intervention group (n &t...
Source: Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions Our findings support growing evidence for differential trajectories to PTG and PTSD symptoms in cancer. Such cognitive factors may be important therapeutic targets in psycho-oncology interventions. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? The diagnosis of cancer and its subsequent treatment can result in symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Positive changes and psychosocial growth (post-traumatic growth; PTG) are also common as a result of patients' experience of cancer. What does this study add? This study identified predictors of positive (PTG) and negative trauma (PTSD) ...
Source: British Journal of Health Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Br J Health Psychol Source Type: research
 How often do you think about death? If you’re like most people, you probably try to keep it in the back corners of your mind. But according to today’s guest, Kate Manser, remembering you might die tomorrow is the best inspiration to live today. Kate asserts that when we incorporate a certain level of mortality awareness into our daily lives, it motivates us to value life so much more and to live each day with intention. We start to find joy in the small things and live in a way that makes a positive outward ripple for all of humanity. So how do we manage to think about death without falling into fear? Tune...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Death & Dying General Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Interview LifeHelper Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
Journal of Palliative Medicine, Ahead of Print.
Source: Journal of Palliative Medicine - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Cancer is a huge psychological difficulty both for the patient and the caregivers. Patients often suffer from hopelessness, helplessness, depression, anxiety or other psychological disturbances. Although the cognitive behavioral interventions (cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness) are evidence based, short, time-limited, focused treatments for patients with cancer, in Hungary there are only little evidence and experiences about application of cognitive behavioral methods in the oncological care. The main goal of this review to provide a survey about the cognitive behavioral theories and the internati...
Source: Magyar Onkologia - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Magy Onkol Source Type: research
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