GI highlights from the literature

Basic scienceMLKL-mediated hepatocyte necrosis in immune liver disease—not all hepatocyte death is the same Gunther C, He GW, Kremer AE, et al. The pseudokinase MLKL mediates programmed hepatocellular necrosis independently of RIPK3 during hepatitis. J Clin Invest 2016;126:4346–60. Hepatocellular death has long been associated with both acute and chronic liver injury. Mechanisms of cell death can extend beyond apoptosis and necrosis and vary greatly, with pathways such as necroptosis (programmed cell necrosis) now well described. A more detailed dissection of the pathways involved in hepatocellular death in different modes of liver injury may yield new insights into disease pathogenesis. In this article, the authors describe a novel mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL)-dependent programmed hepatocyte necrosis pathway, which may have relevance for the pathogenesis of immune-mediated liver diseases. In the context of necroptosis, receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) results in the activation of MLKL, which...
Source: Gut - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: JournalScan Source Type: research

Related Links:

We report a case of a 76-year-old male who presented with recurrent ileal conduit site peristomal hemorrhage without known chronic liver disease. His liver function tests were normal, but computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed liver nodularity and peristomal varices. He was diagnosed to have cirrhosis with portal hypertension and further tested positive for active hepatitis C infection. The patient's extrahepatic portosystemic ileal conduit site shunt was successfully treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and endovascular variceal coiling. This case identifies a situation where it is ...
Source: Indian Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The levels of soluble CD146, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGF-A were highly elevated in AH patients, and alcohol abstinence did not completely reverse these abnormalities. PMID: 32246771 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
Clinical Liver Disease, Volume 15, Issue 3, Page 129-132, March 2020.
Source: Clinical Liver Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Conclusion: Abstinence from alcohol following AC/AH diagnosis was achieved in 39% of patients. Abstinence was not related to increased survival for alcoholic liver disease patients at one-year, which might partly indicate that this might be a marker that some patients were 'too sick to drink'. AC and AH patients who survived one year and remained abstinent had a favorable long-term prognosis. PMID: 32233877 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Scand J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Treatment with first generation protease inhibitors (PI)  + peg-interferon (pegIFN) and ribavirin (RBV...
Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Abstract Alcoholic liver disease is a consolidated indication for liver transplantation, but many unsolved issues can be highlighted. Patients with alcohol use disorder develop peculiar comorbidities that can become contraindications for transplantation. Moreover, a number of social and psychological patterns should be evaluated to select candidates with a low risk of alcohol relapse and adequate post-transplant adherence. In this context, the 6-month rule is too rigid to be widely applied. A short period of abstinence (1 to 3 months) is useful to estimate recovery of liver function and, possibly to avoid transpla...
Source: The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Korean J Intern Med Source Type: research
Semin Liver Dis DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1708876Chronic liver injury due to viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders is a worldwide health concern. Insufficient treatment of chronic liver injury leads to fibrosis, causing liver dysfunction and carcinogenesis. Most cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develop in the fibrotic liver. Pathological features of liver fibrosis include extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation, mesenchymal cell activation, immune deregulation, and angiogenesis, all of which contribute to the precancerous environment, supporting tumor development. Among liver cells, hepatic stellate cell...
Source: Seminars in Liver Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
AbstractViral hepatitis B and C are among the leading causes of acute and chronic liver disease in the USA. The nature of chronic liver disease is often asymptomatic. This is problematic because the majority of individuals living with chronic hepatitis B and chronic hepatitis C do not know that they are infected and can communicate the disease to others. Furthermore, early disease recognition and treatment have been shown to improve long-term outcomes and decrease healthcare cost. These diseases affect vulnerable populations disproportionately. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are more likely than the general US popul...
Source: Journal of Cancer Education - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth common type of cancer and second largest cause of cancer-related deaths globally [1]. HCC also exhibits heterogenous characteristics among regions [2]. In etiology, hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common cause of HCC in Asia, including China and Korea, where patients are younger and are commonly diagnosed with advanced disease [3,4]. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and alcoholic liver disease are common causes of HCC in Western countries, while non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases is another cause that is becoming increasingly common [5], where patients are frequently found to have dec...
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
It turns out that many more people than just boomers can benefit from testing for hepatitis C, a viral infection of the liver that often causes no symptoms. If you’re a member of the baby-boom generation (born between 1946 and 1964), your doctor may have already recommended the test. But those born before or after those years may not have known about the test unless they had a risk factor for hepatitis C, such as a history of intravenous drug use. A new guideline is changing this approach. Why the different recommendations for baby boomers? In 2012–2013, the CDC and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Infectious diseases Men's Health Sexual Conditions Women's Health Source Type: blogs
More News: Hepatitis | Liver | Liver Disease | Urology & Nephrology