Electrical stimulation ventilatory feedback facilitates maintenance of a prolonged expiration pattern during exercise: A proof-of-concept study in healthy adults.

This study aimed at verifying the safety and effects of electrical stimulation ventilatory feedback (ESVF) to provide feedback during expiration, which may assist with breathing control in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because this is a new therapy, we examined the feasibility of the therapy in healthy adults. The 23 healthy adult participants were randomized into two groups: a stimulation group that received ESVF and a placebo group with the ESVF device attached, but not activated. Sensory stimulation was provided at a frequency of 20 Hz and pulse duration of 200 μs. During breathing training, participants practiced a prolonged expiration pattern and were instructed to maintain the breathing pattern during exercise. A variety of parameters such as respiratory time from the gas analyzer monitor and quantitative load were measured during lower-extremity cycle ergometer exercise. The primary outcome was the expiratory to inspiratory time ratio, which was significantly higher in the stimulation group than in the placebo group, both during and after exercise. No side effects were reported during the use of electrical stimulation. Therefore, ESVF is safe and facilitates maintenance of a prolonged expiration pattern during and after exercise. PMID: 27458667 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Physiother Theory Pract Source Type: research

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It was on November 21st that I was last in Copenhagen, not to have some of that famous Æbleflæsk but to moderate an OECD event. I was tasked to challenge health ministers and other policy makers about the impact of advanced technologies on patients’ lives and what regulations would facilitate these changes. It was encouraging to see country leaders take a positive stance towards digital health and to hear about concrete examples as to how they are implementing technology to modify their local healthcare landscape. This experience served as an inspiration to write this article. In it we will highli...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Healthcare Policy digital health Medicine technology healthcare design Source Type: blogs
Conclusion:Further examination of twice per day functional electrostimulation in hospitalized patients with COPD with acute exacerbation appears warranted. PMID: 31769337 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Physiother Theory Pract Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 November 2019Source: Journal of PhysiotherapyAuthor(s): Tristan Bonnevie, Mark Elkins
Source: Journal of Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Source Type: research
Conclusion: Functional exercise provides additional increases in musculoskeletal mass and protein mass, as well as a reduction of body fat mass and visceral fat area compared to conventional training in COPD.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Physiotherapists Source Type: research
Conclusion: Addition of an active exercises to chest physiotheraphy may be more beneficial in COPD patients.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Physiotherapists Source Type: research
Background: Only few studies have investigated the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) on fatigue in COPD. To date, it remains unknown which patients have a clinically relevant improvement in fatigue following PR. Purpose of this study was to identify these responders.Methods: Demographics, lung function, mood status (SCL90-A and BDI-PC), exercise tolerance (6MWD), and health status (NCSI) were assessed before and after a 12-week PR program at Dekkerswald Radboudumc (Nijmegen, The Netherlands). Fatigue was assessed using the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS)-Fatigue. Patients with a decline ≥10 points (MCID) were...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Physiotherapists Source Type: research
This study assessed PA enablers, barriers, needs and preferences of patients attending or not PR.Two focus groups were conducted. One with 6 patients (70.2±8.8yrs; FEV1 55.5±14.4pp) attending a PR programme and another with 6 patients (65±7.6yrs; FEV1 58.2±21.4pp) naìˆve to PR. Interviews were analysed thematically.Enablers, barriers and needs were similar in both groups. Enablers/barriers fitted in health-related, psychosocial and environmental sub-themes. Identified enablers included: recognising that PA delays the onset of frailty and promotes wellbeing and functionality, being motivated by ...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Physiotherapists Source Type: research
Conclusion: Frailty is common in CRD patients referred to PR and this data suggests pulmonary rehabilitation is effective in CRD irrespective of frailty status.Reference:1 Mittal J Prim Care Community Health 2016;7(1)10-15
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Physiotherapists Source Type: research
Rationale: Disease-specific knowledge is often assessed in COPD patients in order to identify gaps, to encourage education and self-management.Aim: to determine the level of disease-specific knowledge among Greek patients with COPD before entering pulmonary rehabilitation (PR)Method: 50 (34 men) COPD patients (FEV1 49±3% pred; GOLD stages I-IV; age: 67±1 years; 6MWD 383±18 m) recruited before entering in a 3-month PR program. Pulmonary and functional data were collected at baseline. Disease-specific knowledge was assessed using the 65-item Bristol COPD Knowledge Questionnaire (BCKQ). It contains 13 top...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Physiotherapists Source Type: research
Conclusions: This study showed non-inferiority of device procedure compared to CPT. Simeox ACT was considered safe and feasible for airway clearance management during hospitalization of different lung diseases with mucus retention
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Problems Source Type: research
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