Stroke Prevention in Real-life Practice

We have greatly enjoyed reading the recently published article by McIntyre et al. (1). The authors distributed a 16-question, web-based survey to Canadian residency programs and each scenario involved a 76-year-old man with new atrial fibrillation (AF) and a CHADS2 score of 3. The authors revealed the discordance between clinical guidelines for stroke prevention in AF and the practice of Canadian emergency medicine residents. Despite ranking the risk of adverse events as their most important consideration and the superior safety profile of that non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs), residents underused this class of agents compared to warfarin.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research

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Authors: Cohen AT, Hunt BJ Abstract The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have transformed the management of thrombotic disorders. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that DOACs can replace vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in the 2 existing major indications for anticoagulation: the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation and the acute treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE); this literature is widely known. In this article, we will concentrate on the less well-discussed benefits of the use of DOACs-using low doses as primary and secondary prophylaxis in both venous and arterial thro...
Source: Hematology ASH Education Program - Category: Hematology Tags: Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program Source Type: research
Authors: Kimpton M, Siegal DM Abstract A 77-year-old man with atrial fibrillation and a CHA2DS2Vasc score of 6 for hypertension, age, diabetes, and previous stroke is brought to the emergency department with decreased level of consciousness. He is anticoagulated with rivaroxaban (a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor [FXaI]) and received his last dose about 4 hours before presentation. Urgent computed tomography of the head shows intracerebral hemorrhage. Because of his previous stroke, the patient's family is concerned about treating the bleed with pharmacological agents that may increase the risk of stroke. What are ...
Source: Hematology ASH Education Program - Category: Hematology Tags: Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program Source Type: research
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a substantially higher risk of thromboembolism, particularly stroke events, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Oral anticoagulation (OAC), while effective in reducing embolic events in AF patients, is associated with an increased bleeding risk. Thus, not all patients with AF are candidates for OAC and some are only candidates for OAC in the short term. Of the available nonpharmacologic strategies for the management of AF, left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) has emerged as a potential approach for reducing the risk of systemic thromboembolism in AF patients eligi...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
ConclusionsIn AF patients who survived an ICH, restarting OAC was not associated with a greater risk of recurrent ICH. Evidence from randomized controlled studies is needed to further clarify the clinical benefit of restarting OAC in this high-risk population. Further evaluation of which individuals benefit from restarting OAC is also needed to provide more clinical guidance.
Source: American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our results suggest that in this community-dwelling population, a higher CAA score is related to cognitive impairment and a higher risk of stroke, dementia, and death. The composite CAA score can be used to practically quantify the severity of vascular brain injury.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study aimed to explore medication adherence in patients with AF, and explore associations with health literacy, cognition, or AF knowledge.
Source: Heart, Lung and Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
ConclusionIn patients with NVAF receiving apixaban for stroke prevention in this real-world analysis,>  80% were prescribed an appropriate dosage of apixaban. Proactive procedures, such as integrating an electronic dosing algorithm, educating healthcare providers, and involving clinical pharmacists in medication review, may help ensure the use of appropriate apixaban dosages.
Source: Drugs and Therapy Perspectives - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
AbstractThe best strategy in atrial fibrillation (AF) after  >  12 months after an acute coronary syndrome or in patients with chronic coronary syndrome without an indication for interventional revascularization remains unclear. European guidelines generally recommend therapy with oral anticoagulation (OAC) alone, whereas North American guidelines advise com bination therapy consisting of OAC plus antiplatelet therapy in some patients. We performed a meta-analysis of available trials comparing these treatment strategies. The primary endpoint was major adverse cardiac events (MACE), secondary endp...
Source: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewCryptogenic stroke describes a subset of ischemic stroke for which no cause can be found despite a structured investigation. There are a number of putative mechanisms of cryptogenic ischemic stroke including a covert structural cardiac lesion, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, hypercoagulable state or undiagnosed malignancy. Because many of these proposed mechanisms are embolic – and based on studies of thrombus history showing commonalities between thrombus composition between cardioembolic and cryptogenic strokes – the concept of embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS) (Hart et al....
Source: Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Discussion From Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Ann Intern Med. 2019 Dec 03;171(11):828-836 Authors: Burns RB, Zimetbaum P, Lubitz SA, Smetana GW Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, affecting 2.7 million to 6.1 million persons in the United States. Although some persons with AFib have no symptoms, others do. For those without symptoms, AFib may be detected by 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), single-lead monitors (such as ambulatory blood pressure monitors and pulse oximeters), or consumer devices (such as wearable monitors and smartphones). Pulse pa...
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
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