Isolation of Chemoresistant Cell Subpopulations

Chemoresistance is a major challenge for cancer therapy and drives tumor relapse. The emergence, within the treated tumor mass, of specific cancer cell subpopulations endowed with high tolerance to the microenvironment stress induced by therapy is being growingly recognized as a mechanism of tumor progression. To obtain detailed information with regard to the pathways underlying survival, expansion, and microenvironmental cross talk of such chemoresistant cell subpopulations may be instrumental for cancer chemoprevention. Additionally, the obtained cell subpopulations may be used for direct screening of cancer chemopreventive compounds, in appropriate experimental settings. Here we report detailed experimental procedures that we and others have setup in order to obtain cell cultures enriched for chemoresistant cells from both malignant pleural mesothelioma specimens and primary cell cultures. We provide indications for the purification and characterization of those chemoresistant cell populations and to generally validate the obtained enriched cell populations for their chemoresistance.
Source: Springer protocols feed by Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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Thoracic surgeon Dr. Robert Cameron and the Pacific Mesothelioma Center moved closer to a major treatment advance by obtaining U.S. patent approval for their novel mesenchymal stem cell research program. The patent approval in February makes the research program more attractive to potential investors who could accelerate development and change the way malignant mesothelioma is treated. “This is a big deal in the developmental path for MSC [mesenchymal stem cell] therapy,” Patent Adviser Dr. Walid Sabbagh told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “The patent is a pathway to really help these cancer pat...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Current Cancer Therapy Reviews - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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