Vaccination in pregnancy (VIP), PHE (updated 31st December 2020)
This guidance contains advice for health professionals on pregnant women who are vaccinated against coronavirus (COVID-19), chicken pox (varicella), shingles or measles, mumps, rubella. Recent updates: 31st December 2020 - updated Vaccination in pregnancy (VIP) notification form. 18th December 2020 - updated VIP notification form and added COVID-19 vaccine information. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Ambulance Science Podcast: Make Up Your Own Mind About the Vaccine
Get every episode of The Ambulance Science Podcast by subscribing to Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts. Where I’m coming from (compared to most of my colleagues): Master’s in Public Health with a concentration in Health Policy from Yale Medical School.FT Faculty at GWU School of Medicine & Southern Connecticut State University MPH Program, and long-time adjunct faculty at NYMC MPH program in Health Policy.Assistant Commissioner of Health at the NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene during the first SARS outbreak.Served as State EMS Director, Consultant to Public Health ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Podcasts Ambulance Science Source Type: news

Here's how to tackle the Covid-19 anti-vaxxers | Will Hanmer-Lloyd
Do not demonise. To optimise the vaccine rollout, all of us must show respect to those who are unsure about inoculationsWill Hanmer-Lloyd is a behavioural strategistThe Covid-19 vaccines, which are up to95% effective, have the potential to save millions of lives in the UK and many more around the world.Yet creating the vaccines is just the first step. We now need to produce them as quickly as possible, work out the logistics of distribution and administration and – most importantly – ensure as many people as possible take them. And as the history of vaccines shows, that is not as easy as some might assume. You only hav...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Will Hanmer-Lloyd Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Health Pharmaceuticals industry Health policy Business Politics Public services policy Science Society UK news World news Matt Hancock Source Type: news

MMR vaccine may protect against severe illness from COVID-19, study finds
The measles, mumps and rubella vaccine appears to offer at least some protection against COVID-19, possibly preventing severe illness from the disease, a study published Friday by the online journal mBio found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MMR vaccine may protect against Covid-19, study claims
Scientists from the University of Georgia claim the MMR jab, which protects against measles, mumps and rubella, prevents people from getting seriously unwell with Covid-19. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MMR vaccine could protect against COVID-19
(American Society for Microbiology) The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine has been theorized to provide protection against COVID-19. In a new study published inmBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers provide further proof of this by showing that mumps IgG titers, or levels of IgG antibody, are inversely correlated with severity in recovered COVID-19 patients previously vaccinated with the MMR II vaccine produced by Merck (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Three Groups of People Biden Must Reach Out to if He Wants to End the Pandemic, According to Dr. Leana Wen
When the long history of the COVID-19 pandemic is finally written, Dr. Leana Wen will be remembered as one of the most reassuring faces and reliable voices in this period of hardship. A former health commissioner of Baltimore and current visiting professor at the George Washington University School of Public Health, Wen has provided both encouragement and tough-love truths for a public hungry for information and counsel. In a Nov. 19 conversation with TIME’s Alice Park, she offered her candid thoughts about what is very much an inflection point in the pandemic—with two new vaccines (one from Moderna and one fro...
Source: TIME: Health - November 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Little Recognition and Less Pay: These Female Healthcare Workers Are Rural India ’s First Defense Against COVID-19
Archana Ghugare’s ringtone, a Hindu devotional song, has been the background score of her life since March. By 7 a.m. on a mid-October day, the 41-year-old has already received two calls about suspected COVID-19 cases in Pavnar, her village in the Indian state of Maharashtra. As she gets ready and rushes out the door an hour later, she receives at least four more. “My family jokes that not even Prime Minister Modi gets as many calls as I do,” she says. Ghugare, and nearly a million other Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) assigned to rural villages and small towns across India, are on the front ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abhishyant Kidangoor Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature India overnight video Source Type: news

1 Million Women Healthcare Workers Have Been Drafted to Fight COVID-19 in India — for as Little as $40 a Month
Archana Ghugare’s ringtone, a Hindu devotional song, has been the background score of her life since March. By 7 a.m. on a mid-October day, the 41-year-old has already received two calls about suspected COVID-19 cases in Pavnar, her village in the Indian state of Maharashtra. As she gets ready and rushes out the door an hour later, she receives at least four more. “My family jokes that not even Prime Minister Modi gets as many calls as I do,” she says. Ghugare and nearly 1 million other Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) assigned to rural villages and small towns across India are on the front li...
Source: TIME: Health - October 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abhishyant Kidangoor Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature India overnight video Source Type: news

What Causes Joint Pain?
DiscussionMusculoskeletal problems are common problems in pediatric practice with up to 15% of acute care visits being for this problem. Joint pain is a common concern for families but the differential diagnosis is extensive and needs thoughtful consideration. History is a key to discerning the potential diagnosis but also in guiding the physical examination and laboratory examination. Family history especially for systemic diseases should be considered. On physical examination all joints should be examined include sacroiliac and temporomandibular joints. Is this arthritis or arthralgia? Distinction between inflammatory...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - October 26, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Could an existing vaccine make COVID-19 less deadly? Mexico City study provides support
(Parsemus Foundation) A report supporting the concept of trained immunity for protection from severe COVID-19 was published in Allergy. COVID-19 patients recently vaccinated with the mumps-measles-rubella (MMR) vaccine had a milder infection than expected given their age and health status. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Newly found viruses suggest rubella originated in animals
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Gibbons, A. Tags: Epidemiology, Medicine, Diseases In Depth Source Type: news

First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In a Ugandan forest, a team of American and African scientists take oral swabs from insect-eating cyclops leaf-nosed bats. In a necropsy room near the Baltic Sea, researchers try to determine what killed a donkey, a Bennett's tree-kangaroo and a capybara at a German zoo -- all of them suffering from severe brain swelling. Neither team was aware of the other, yet they were both about to converge on a discovery that would help solve a long-enduring mystery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 7, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Australia's 'no jab, no pay' rule has little effect on anti-vaxxer parents – study
Experts say the policy prompts people happy to vaccinate their children but doesn ’t work on those who oppose vaccination scienceAustralia ’s “no jab, no pay” policy has been associated with a drop in the number of children catching up on their first dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, suggesting the policy has had little impact on those who reject vaccination science.However, the policy was associated with more children catching up on their second dose of the vaccine and on their diphtheria –tetanus–pertussis vaccine, especially in lower socioeconomic status areas, the study published in the Medica...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Health Vaccines and immunisation Science Australia news Source Type: news

Trial Tests MMR Vaccine to Help Prevent COVID-19
A new clinical trial will try to determine whether the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine can protect health care workers from being infected with COVID-19. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news