Query: emergency medicine australia

This page shows you your search results in order of date.

Order by Relevance | Date

Total 152 results found since Jan 2013.

The Future of Emergency Medicine: 6 Technologies That Make Patients The Point-of-Care
Car crashes, home injuries, fires, natural disasters: every minute – if not every second – spent without treatment in such cases of medical emergencies and high-risk patients could reduce the chance of survival or proper recovery. In fact, when deprived of oxygen, permanent brain damage begins after only 4 minutes, while death can occur as soon as 4-6 minutes later. In this race against time, digital health technologies that turn patients into the point-of-care could prove to be game-changers for first responders and emergency units.  From driverless cars through medical drones to artificial intelligence (...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 29, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Portable Medical Diagnostics Robotics Telemedicine & Smartphones digital health Health 2.0 Innovation technology emergency emergency medicin Source Type: blogs

2020: Jumanji Or Dystopia
“There’s No Going Back to ‘Normal’”, crudely proclaims the headline of a June piece from The Atlantic. “The Terrible Consequences of Australia’s Uber-Bushfires” reads a recent Wired article. One of our own April articles was titled “Will Medical Workers Deal With PTSD After COVID-19?”. If it wasn’t clear, an article published earlier this year in The Conversation rightly asks: “Are we living in a dystopia?”.  Indeed, what was once relegated to the fertile minds of fiction novelists has become daily occurrences. Many are drawing similarities to “prophetic” works of fiction such as the c...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Science Fiction Security & Privacy Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality black mirror dystopia coronavirus covid19 jumanji Death Stranding video games bushfires Source Type: blogs

Thinklabs One Electronic Stethoscope Helps Physicians Stop Spread of COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the implementation and use of telemedicine and telehealth platforms and devices as part of current day-to-day standards of care in many hospital and healthcare systems. In this era of social distancing, doctors on our...
Source: Medgadget - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Diagnostics Education Emergency Medicine Exclusive Geriatrics Informatics Pediatrics Public Health Source Type: blogs

The intricacies of working as a doctor with a spinal cord injury
I work as a resident in Australia’s busiest emergency department. Well, it was the busiest at a recent count anyway. The department is housed in the city of Gold Coast. The city sprawls across a beautiful stretch of beach. When I wake up, I turn my head to see the sun hanging out over the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more.
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 11, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/dinesh-palipana" rel="tag" > Dr. Dinesh Palipana < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Butterfly Network Expands Applications for Smartphone-Connected Ultrasound: Interview
Butterfly Network, the digital health unicorn democratizing medical imaging, is continuing to add new applications for its handheld, single probe, smartphone-connected ultrasound technology. The Butterfly iQ, the multi-purpose pocket-sized ultrasound...
Source: Medgadget - November 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Exclusive News Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Radiology Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Nanomesh Loaded with Antibiotics for Targeted Wound and Infection Treatment
Antibiotics are usually only needed at particular sites, where infection is likely to start. Yet, they’re delivered throughout the entire body via pills and injections. This results in poor localized effectiveness, unnecessary effects on the re...
Source: Medgadget - October 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Emergency Medicine Materials Orthopedic Surgery Plastic Surgery Public Health Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

How Could Digital Health Fight Against The Climate Catastrophe?
Climate change is the greatest health challenge of the 21st century, and threatens all aspects of society, says the WHO in its COP24 Special Report. What could digital health technologies do to support the fight against the climate crisis? How could healthcare processes, facilities, medical devices become more sustainable? As it is humanity’s priority to mitigate the worsening as well as the impact of rising temperatures and extreme weather events, we tried to figure out what role digital health could assume here. We found many options – and even more possibilities for future development. The climate crisis is our ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 11, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine air asthma climate climate catastrophe climate change climate crisis digital digital health efficient Healthcare mosquito optimize resilience solar sustainability technology Source Type: blogs

The eICU Is Turning Night Into Day Through Telemedicine
Physicians and nurses deliver care from the other side of the Earth by working in daylight hours in Australia covering night shifts in Atlanta with the help of telemedicine. That’s the core concept of how night intensive care in the Emory eICU Center is carried out in partnership with Emory Healthcare, the Royal Perth Hospital in Australia and health technology company, Philips. Emory is the very first who’s bringing its staff to the other side of the globe for better patient care and more satisfied staff. The vision to turn “night into day” was co-developed by Timothy Buchman, Ph.D., MD, founding director of the E...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Telemedicine & Smartphones care clinical practice critical care digital digital health doctor Healthcare healthcare design healthcare process healthcare system Innovation nurse technol Source Type: blogs

Drum roll please … presenting this year ’ s winners of our F1000Prime Awards
Throughout the year our Faculty works tirelessly to ensure we never miss a notable article to help us stay on top of the literature. Therefore, each year it’s fitting that we recognise their valuable work by way of two types of award, namely our AFM Travel Grant Awards and Faculty Member of the Year Awards. Whist, of course, we are grateful for all of the contributions each and every member of the F1000Prime Faculty makes, these awards acknowledge those who have made extraordinary contributions and whose recommendations have proved particularly popular and engaging throughout the year. Thank you very much to our entire F...
Source: Naturally Selected - March 1, 2019 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Steven Lokwan Tags: F1000 Institutions Researchers Source Type: blogs

National Digital Health Strategies Around the World
As healthcare systems struggle with unsustainability, a shortage of medical professionals, while technological development is soaring, digital health seems to be a viable path toward making healthcare feasible. We looked around the world, which countries have the same idea in mind trying to put it into practice. The following national digital health strategies are the examples we found. Why does every country need a digital health strategy? Three reasons necessitate the urgent introduction of a digital health strategy in every country. (1) First and foremost, healthcare systems are unsustainable. According to OECD projecti...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Digital Health Research Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy australia Denmark digital health strategy healthcare system healthcare systems Innovation Israel new zealand rwanda Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Tonsillitis and the Bull
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Peer Reviewers: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia and Dr Mark Little, ED physician QLD, Australia. You are working in far North Queensland and encounter a 20 year old Indigenous man with tonsillitis on your ED short stay ward round. He has been receiving IV penicillin and metronidazole overnight but is deteriorating and now cannot open his mouth beyond 1.5cm, and has a swollen neck (some might say ‘Bull neck’). In add...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine antitoxin bull neck c. diphtheriae c.ulcerans DAT pseudomembrane vaccine Source Type: blogs

Calling all Educators! … Make a difference in ICU Education
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog It is an exciting time to be an Educator involved in critical care in Australia and New Zealand! We now have an active interprofessional grassroots network working in collaboration with organisations such as CICM, ACCCN, ANZICS, ICN, ANZAHPE, and SMACC (among others!) to advance clinical education in critical care. This Network seeks to: promote and develop the Clinician Educator role implement best practice education in critical care foster education scholarship and resea...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Conference Education Intensive Care adelaide ANZCEN Australia clinician educators critical care network new zealand unconference Source Type: blogs

Calling all Educators! … Make a difference in ICU Education
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog It is an exciting time to be an Educator involved in critical care in Australia and New Zealand! We now have an active interprofessional grassroots network working in collaboration with organisations such as CICM, ACCCN, ANZICS, ICN, ANZAHPE, and SMACC (among others!) to advance clinical education in critical care. This Network seeks to: promote and develop the Clinician Educator role implement best practice education in critical care foster education scholarship and resea...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Conference Education Intensive Care adelaide ANZCEN Australia clinician educators critical care network new zealand unconference Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 010 Fever, Arthralgia and Rash
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 010 Peer Reviewer: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia You are an ED doc working in Perth over schoolies week. An 18 yo man comes into ED complaining of fever, rash a “cracking headache” and body aches. He has just hopped off the plane from Bali where he spent the last 2 weeks partying, boozing and running amok. He got bitten by “loads” of mosquitoes because he forgot to take insect repellent. On examination he looks miserable,...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine arthralgia dengue fever rash Source Type: blogs

MRaCC Alice Springs – a retrieval experience like no other!
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog This is a guest post by Dr Michelle Withers (@desertoak), emergency physician at Alice Springs Hospital On February 12th, 2018, a new and completely unique service went live in Alice Springs – the Medical Retrieval and Consultation Centre (MRaCC). The Central Australian Retrieval service has been operating from the Alice Springs Hospital in conjunction with RFDS in various guises for many years, and we were first accredited for training in 2006. We already consider oursel...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 11, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Emergency Medicine Pre-hospital / Retrieval Alice Springs medical retrieval and consultation centre michelle withers MRaCC Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 008 Total TB Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 008 Peer Reviewer Dr McBride ID physician, Wisconsin TB affects 1/3rd of the population and one patient dies every 20 seconds from TB. Without treatment 50% of pulmonary TB patients will be dead in 5 years. In low to middle income countries both TB and HIV can be ubiquitous, poor compliance can lead to drug resistance and malnourished infants are highly susceptible. TB can be very complex and this post will hopefully give you the backbone to TB m...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine Genexpert meningitis TB TB meningitis Tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

The Way Health Information Is Handled In Australia Looks Like Changing. Badly Needed Indeed.
A kind commenter sent this link to the blog today:https://acem.org.au/getmedia/dde074e9-5bd3-4a00-b26a-c651cef81a15/earlyengagementpaperv1-0.aspxFollowing it you get this:Interoperability and Connected Healthcare in Australia Early Engagement Paper27 February 2018 V1.0 - Approved or external useDocument ID: Interoperability Early Engagement Paper Version 1.0What is not clear is just why it is hosted on the Aust. College of Emergency Medicine Website? This also looks to be the only copy out there.The whole document is well worth a read (Written by EY) but there are some highlights to me:First:What Can We Learn From Oth...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - April 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 006 Watery Diarrhoea
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 006 Our medical student who caught shigella on a Nepalese elective has a thirst for adventure. They plan to help at a Bangladesh refugee camp but the latest CDC report states there have been some cases of cholera. They’ve done a little bit of reading and want your help to teach them all about cholera and how they may prepare and best serve their new community. Questions: Q1. What is cholera and how is it transmitted? Answer and interpreta...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 27, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine cholera diarrhoea john snow ORS rice water diarrhoea watery diarrhoea Source Type: blogs

Introducing … Resuscitology
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The latest project I’m involved in – led by Cliff Reid with my FOAM friends Nat May, Geoff Healy, Brian Burns, and Karel Habig – has just gone live, it is: This is what it’s all about: A two-day residential course for resuscitationists in the Blue Mountains, New South Wales, Australia on May 9-10th 2018. A different course. Personal. Tailored. Intense in parts. Fun throughout. But be prepared to go deep. Your faculty have dedicated their lives to...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Intensive Care Resuscitation brian burns Chris Nickson cliff reid course geoff healy karel habig nat may resuscitology Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 002 Rabies
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 002 A 19 year old gap year student has returned from India to your emergency department reporting she was bitten by a monkey at a temple. A selfie gone wrong but it scored 1000+ likes on Facebook… She is concerned because one of the Facebook comments suggested she may have rabies! A quick Google search suggested 60,000 people a year DIE from rabies. Should she be worried? Should you be worried? Questions Q1. What other questions should yo...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 27, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine rabies Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 89 with Michelle Johnston (Dustfall)
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The fabulous @eleytherius. You may know her as Dr Johnston, as a long term LITFL contributor, as a Mega-FOAM performer, as a some-time feline choreographer or as a Fabulous Female of FOAM®. She sings, she dances and she writes books. She is a creative powerhouse. She is an educator extraordinaire. But we’re not going to talk about that. We’re going to talk about Dustfall; a new novel by someone who you can relate to, somewhat works in critical care, someone that has ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean Literary Medicine Dustfall Dustfall - A novel michelle johnston Source Type: blogs

Stethee, an AI Powered Electronic Stethoscope, Now Available
M3DICINE, a Brisbane, Australia firm, just launched an “AI enabled” electronic stethoscope called Stethee. The device, which we originally profiled a few years ago while it was still a Kickstarter project, can be used like a traditional s...
Source: Medgadget - January 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Telemedicine Source Type: blogs

The Future of Emergency Medicine: Innovations Making Patients The Point-of-Care
Every minute spent without treatment could reduce the chance of survival in case of medical emergency and trauma patients. Digital health innovations making patients the point-of-care could become a great help for first responders and emergency units in the battle against time. Here, we collected what trends and technologies will have an impact on the future of emergency medicine. Six minutes before brain damage Car crashes, home injuries, fires, natural disasters. The difference between life and death often depends on the speed and efficiency of emergency care services. The work of doctors, paramedics, and nurses being in...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 28, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: imported CPR digital health emergency emergency medicine EMS first aid first response future Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation technology Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 83 Pre-Hospital Medicine with Gregor Prosen
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog ED people doing house visits? Medical retrieval teams having a cup of tea and taking a detailed social history? Emergency doctors going to someone’s home before they come to the ED and recommending treatment at home? Including End of Life treatment? Sound Crazy? Ever been to Maribor? Slovenia? I spoke with Slovenian Emergency Physician and Pre-Hospital Gregor Prosen at dasSMACC. He talks like an emergency physician. He curses like an emergency physician. Gregor ju...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 14, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean gregor prosen Serbia Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 77 Paul Middleton chats with RollCageMedic
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog In Australia alone thousands of people have an out of hospital cardiac arrest each year. Only 10% survive. It’s a very scary and dangerous rollercoaster. No better place to talk about that than under a real roller-coaster under the Sydney Harbour Bridge with Paul Middleton. Matt went to Luna Park in Sydney a few weeks back. Not to ride the roller coaster nor knock coconuts off their stands for a teddy bear, but to attend the Resus@ThePark conference. He took a few minu...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 19, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean Paul Middleton Resus @ The Park Take Heart Australia Vivid Australia Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 181
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the  181st edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains  5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Justin Morgenstern and Ch...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Emergency Medicine Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE Toxicology and Toxinology critical care EBM literature recommendations research and reviews Resuscitation Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 166
Welcome to the 166th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Soren Rudolph, Justin Morgenstern and, of course, Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&R project or check o...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 28, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Administration Anaesthetics Education Emergency Medicine Intensive Care Pre-hospital / Retrieval R&R in the FASTLANE Toxicology and Toxinology critical care recommendations research and reviews Resuscitation Source Type: blogs

Simulympics
SimWars! Huh! Yeah! What are they good for? Err… absolutely nothing. Enter Simulympics: The format: two sweaty, blood-spattered, MRSA-encrusted teams of four. From two of Queensland’s busiest and feistiest emergency departments. Side-by-side, 40 minutes against the clock. An obstacle course of broken body parts, spurting arteries and crunching ribs (made out of finest Laerdal plastic). And a very difficult judging panel: all critical, and no care. The only choking will be in the form of obstructed airways. If you want to see the spectacle, bag yourself one of the last 20 tickets for the Spring Seminar on Emer...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 31, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jo Deverill Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Spring Seminar on Emergency Medicine SSEM Source Type: blogs

Spring Seminar Goes to Noosa!
The Spring Seminar on Emergency Medicine is going to Noosa in September 2016!   In case you haven’t been to an SSEM before – this is a boutique Australasian emergency conference run by a not-for-profit organisation. It is squarely aimed at EM clinicans who like to get their hands dirty. The emphasis is on practical stuff: SSEM is legendary for the quality of its workshops. And its venues! The last three SSEMs have been held in the Barossa Valley, Darwin and Rotorua. The extracurricular activities are brilliant and the conference draws bright, outward-going, active clinicians from all around Australasia. T...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jo Deverill Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Spring Seminar on Emergency Medicine SSEM Source Type: blogs

Foreign policy through the lens of an emergency physician
These seem unrelated, but give me a chance. I was eating outside at a restaurant with my 5 month old, Max, and a car with a modified muffler hit the gas right in front of us. In Australia, you’d call the driver a “hoon.” The noise terrified my boy, and I felt something I’m not used to: protective rage. When Max stopped crying my mind went to struggling families, kids, bombs, drones and suicide bombers, naturally. So I thought I’d type on medicine and foreign affairs. When you arrive in an ER with one-sided leg/arm/face paralysis, you’ll probably be whisked to a CT scanner to see whether...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Expedition and Wilderness Medicine
Guest post Dr Edi Albert – Associate Professor, Remote and Polar Medicine at the University of Tasmania. Director, Wilderness Education Group These two nearly synonymous terms refer broadly to the practice of medicine in austere and remote environments. The former term suggests a “journey with a purpose”, whether scientific, humanitarian, or recreational. The latter terms suggests an environment “undisturbed by human activity”. Either way, a pretty cool way to practice medicine. It is within this context that we can identify three broad aspects to expedition and wilderness medicine: pre-departure preparation ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 25, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sean Rothwell Tags: Medical Specialty Wilderness Medicine adventure adventure medicine Curriculum Dr Bill Lukin Dr Edi Albert Dr Julian Williams Dr Sean Rothwell remote Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 117
This study looked at adding the high frequency linear transducer after failure to identify IUP with the standard transducer. Of 81 initial scans, 27 patients did not have an IUP visualized with the curvilinear probe. Of those, 9 (33%) were found to have an IUP by using the linear probe. (It seems like it is helpful if you can see a probable gestational sac, but can’t identify a fetal pole or yolk sac). Recommended by: Justin Morgenstern Pediatrics Padua AP et al. Isotonic versus hypotonic saline solution for maintenance intravenous fluid therapy in children: a systematic review. Pediatr Nephrol. 2015; 30(7): 1163-7...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 13, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Disaster Education Emergency Medicine Emergency Medicine Update Pediatrics Pre-hospital / Retrieval Radiology Trauma critical care examination Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations research and reviews Resuscitatio Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 116
This article raises the question of how important MIC is and whether we should be developing and testing alternate ways to assess antibiotic efficacy. Recommended by: Anand Swaminathan Emergency Medicine Piazza G et al. A Prospective, Single-Arm, Multicenter Trial of Ultrasound-Facilitated, Catheter-Directed, Low-Dose Fibrinolysis for Acute Massive and Submassive Pulmonary Embolism: The SEATTLE II Study. JACC Cardiovasc Interv 2015; 24;8(10):1382-92. PMID: 26315743 This is simple prospective data on a highly selected group of patients with massive or sub massive PEs. There were almost as many authors as patients here...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 6, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Airway Anaesthetics Cardiology Education Emergency Medicine Infectious Disease Intensive Care Pediatrics Radiology Respiratory critical care examination R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations research and reviews Resuscitation Source Type: blogs

Why Don’t We Wash Our Hands?
Courtesy of the SMACC Podcast, my hand hygiene talk from SMACC Chicago has just been released… Enjoy! Hand hygiene is widely regarded as the bedrock for the prevention of healthcare associated infections (HAIs). HAIs are among the biggest killers in modern medicine. Yet, hand hygiene compliance among healthcare workers remains woefully poor. Why can’t we learn the lessons that Semmelweis taught us nearly 150 years ago? If we can’t teach intelligent healthcare workers to wash their hands properly, what hope do we have as medical educators? This is both a patient safety and a medical education priority. Our patien...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 13, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Emergency Medicine Infectious Disease Intensive Care SMACC chicago culture change hand hygiene hand washing infection control Source Type: blogs

Airway Lessons from the Austere Environment
The Critically Ill Airway course, run by The Alfred ICU and Monash University, is taking place this week. Among the lineup of elite instructors is Dr Brent May (@docbrent), who  has created a 12 minute video lecture on ‘Airway Lessons from the Austere Environment’.Brent is a trauma anaesthetist at The Alfred, a retrieval physician with Adult Retrieval Victoria, and is Chief Medical Officer for the Australian Formula 1 Grand Prix, Motorcycling Australia and Karting Australia. I asked Brent to speak on this topic because I believe that all airway practitioners can benefit from the lessons learned by those wh...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 4, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Airway Anaesthetics Education Emergency Medicine Intensive Care Pre-hospital / Retrieval austere environment brent may critically ill airway course prehospital Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 077
This article sheds some light on the issue. In this study of ICU patients in Australia and New Zealand, the standard SIRS criteria missed 1 in 8 patients who went on to severe sepsis. These results call into question the reliability of the SIRS criteria.Recommended by: Anand SwaminathanThe R&R iconoclastic sneak peek icon keyThe list of contributorsThe R&R ARCHIVER&R Hall of famer You simply MUST READ this!R&R Hot stuff! Everyone’s going to be talking about thisR&R Landmark paper A paper that made a differenceR&R Game Changer? Might change your clinical practiceR&R Eureka! Revolutionary i...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 2, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Cardiology Emergency Medicine Haematology Immunology Infectious Disease Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE critical care Education literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Interested in Toxicology? APAMT and TAPNA
You took WHAT???The more you know, the less you know about a poison…. just look at paracetamol! And if your patient took something you knew a little bit about…. it is always combined with a new chemical name that you have never heard about! Not to mention the forever changing and amazing routes to administer it!If you would like to know more about Toxicology, there will be two amazing Toxicology conferences in Australia this year.On 1st and 2nd of May 2015 there is the TAPNA (Toxicology and Poisons Network Australasia) scientific meeting in Sydney. Since it is closely linked with Emergency Medicine and the pois...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 18, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ioana Vlad Tags: Australia Conference Education Emergency Medicine Toxicology and Toxinology Source Type: blogs

Saving the Healthcare Dollar
The cost of healthcare is rising. New and expensive treatments, longer life expectancy and an ageing population are developing into a tsunami which threatens to flatten the health budget of first world economies.Already we are feeling the effects of this.WA health budget cuts will hit system struggling to meet demandAt the coalface in the emergency department we are being told by our hospital administrators that the health budget cuts must be passed on. We are to find increased productivity and efficiency with no increase in staffing numbers – in fact staff must be cut to achieve budgets constraints. Do more with les...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 11, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: James Winton Tags: Administration Emergency Medicine Medical Humor Administrators Healthcare Dollar Source Type: blogs

Take Heart Australia
Guest Post by Professor Paul Middleton, emergency physician and founder of Take Heart Australia I have spent the last 20 years practicing emergency medicine on the ground and in the air. I have attended countless cardiac arrests both in hospital and the pre-hospital setting; performed compressions on hundreds of chests; sent countless joules of energy through wobbling hearts, and squirted buckets of adrenaline into cannulae, IO needles and ET tubes…but I still have an empty feeling inside – I know we can do better. We hear about cardiac arrest all the time, and as clinicians working in emergency medicine and cr...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 18, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Cardiology Pre-hospital / Retrieval Website Chain of survival OOHCA Paul Middleton Professor Paul Middleton Take Heart Take Heart Australia Source Type: blogs

Palliative Care in Emergency Medicine
Applying some principles learned in Palliative Care to every-day Emergency Medicine practice – a guest post by Professor Ian Rogers FACEM, of St John of God Murdoch Hospital and University of Notre Dame in Perth, Western Australia Earlier this year I did a sabbatical in Palliative Care. I deliberately chose to work with a purely consultative service based in a tertiary teaching hospital. They did not admit under their own bed card nor was there a hospice on site to admit to. We saw patients from all across the hospital; from outpatients to ED, from ICU to slow stream rehabilitation. My aim was to gain an understandin...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 12, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Palliative care Ian Rogers Prof Ian Rogers Source Type: blogs

FACEMs at Night: A Mattress Stuffed with Flaw
This is the second of two perspectives on whether FACEMs should work night night shifts, for the first, see Anand Swaminathan’s ‘FACEMs at Night: An American Perspective‘. Let us take ourselves one fact. One, simple, undeniable fact. One cannot, after all, dispute a fact. A fact, according to most reputable definers of words (and a few, which are my more preferred sources, disreputable ones) is a truth. A thing that is universally known to be true. Merriam-Webster (American, I know, but in light of it’s lexicographically poetic etymology, we must forgive its murderous spelling) defines it as ‘a true ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 21, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michelle Johnston Tags: Australia Emergency Medicine consultant emergency physician FACEM night-shift Source Type: blogs

FACEMs at Night: An American Perspective
This is the first of two perspectives on whether FACEMs should work night night shifts, for the second, see Michelle Johnston’s ‘FACEMs at Night: A Mattress Stuffed with Flaw‘. My father, an active general surgeon who has been in practice for almost five decades often recounts stories of “the good ‘ole days” when it was interns and junior residents who cared for patients most of the day. Supervising physicians were uncommonly found in patient care areas (except the operating room). Residents made critical decisions, often without the necessary training, and they and their patients lived (or died) wi...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 21, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anand Swaminathan Tags: Australia Emergency Medicine anand swaminathan consultant emergency physician FACEM night-shift Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 047
In this study, the research team collected pooled urine (read many people used the urinal they collected from) from a popular nightclub area in London and analyzed the specimens for the presence of illicit drug compounds. The goal was to determine whether this method could be used to track patterns and monitor trends in recreational drug use.  Recommended by: Anand Swaminathan Emergency Medicine, Critical Care, Anaesthetics Hindman BJ et al. Intubation Biomechanics: Laryngoscope Force and Cervical Spine Motion during Intubation with Macintosh and Airtraq Laryngoscopes. Anesthesiology. 2014; 121(2):260-71. PMID...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 9, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anand Swaminathan Tags: Clinical Research Education Emergency Medicine R&R in the FASTLANE critical care Intensive Care literature recommendations Research and Review Source Type: blogs

EMA Journal August 2014
Issue 4 (Vol. 26) of EMA Journal for 2014 was published online on 4th August. Editorial overview by Andrew Gosbell & Geoff Hughes Lifers – the loneliest doctors   (#FOAMed) In the latest dispatch from the FOAM Frontier, Spiegel (@EMNerd_), Johnston (@Eleytherius), Ercleve (@Ercleve) and Nickson (@precordialthump) takes us on board the deep space transporter Odysseus where the deep space medics, jovially known as ‘Lifers’, deal with the perils of the induced mental and physiological stasis of passengers who make the centuries long voyages through deep space. The goal of appropriate sedation and ‘quenc...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 15, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Education EMA Journal Emergency Medicine dental emergencies esop tool kit Lifers pediatric fractures Source Type: blogs

CCC Update 007
Hopefully you are well aware of LITFL’s Critical Care Compendium. It started out as a resource for the FCICM exam — which it is — but has grown into a 1500+ page mega-paedia of critical care. If something isn’t there and you think it should be, let me know and I’ll make it happen. If you are having trouble accessing some pages it is because LITFL has undergone a bit of spring cleaning. The “education/” part of the URL for CCC pages has been removed. For example: http://lifeinthefastlane.com/education/ccc/burnout/ is now http://lifeinthefastlane.com/ccc/burnout/ The links in the searchable...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 12, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Critical Care Compendium Emergency Medicine FCICM Fellowship Intensive Care CCC FCICM exam update Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 143
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 143rd edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM, and ALiEM Chris Ni...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 9, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Health Intensive Care LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 142
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 142nd edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM, and ALiEM Chris Ni...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 1, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Health Intensive Care LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

News from EMA Course in New York – IT systems in ED – need for scribes
I attended the EMA Course in New York last month and although IT systems were not directly part of the course, the topic did arise and the general feeling of the many US emergency physicians appeared to be that current commercial ED software in place in the USA is NOT efficient and comments such as “terrible” were not uncommonly expressed. It seems that the consensus was that for EP’s to be productive with such software they each need to have a personal scribe to ensure adequate timely documentation while allowing them to have adequate time at the bedside with the patients. Furthermore, it seems that the ...
Source: Oz E Medicine - emergency medicine in Australia - July 8, 2011 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: anitaliu Tags: information technology information systems Source Type: blogs