A new DNA sequencing service wants to reward you for sharing your data
Genetics pioneer George Church's new company  says it will sequence your genome for free and secure it on a blockchain, so that you can choose who uses your data (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Prefer tea or coffee? It may be down to your genes for bitter tastes
People with genes that make them taste caffeine more strongly tend to be coffee-drinkers, while tea-drinkers have genetic aversions to strongly bitter tastes (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

New techniques may soon make designer babies a reality – are we ready?
As tests that screen embryos for complex traits become available, it's time to decide how to use these ethically – and where to draw the line (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Exclusive: A new test can predict IVF embryos ’ risk of having a low IQ
A new genetic test that enables people having IVF to screen out embryos likely to have a low IQ or high disease risk could soon become available in the US (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We ’ve discovered a whole new defence system against germs in our noses
Billions of tiny sacs filled with weapons and warning signals to other cells are released into the lining of our noses when dangerous bacteria are detected (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Unsavory Truth review – exposing the food industry ’ s abuse of science
Exaggerated health claims, corporate funding, unpublished negative results: a new book exposes the way the US food industry hijacks science and fights for answers (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The cause of half of all developmental disorders is a genetic mystery
More than 1 in 200 children have serious developmental disorders but we ’ve only been able to find the genetic cause of half of them (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Double the risk of death! The problem with headline health statistics
The way in which a statistic is presented can entirely change how alarming it sounds. And too often, both newspapers and scientific journals choose the most alarming, but least informative, way (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: genetics health Source Type: research

Blood test can spot DNA from eight different types of cancer
A blood test can detect if you have breast, bowel or other cancers by looking for characteristic tumour DNA fragments that have leaked into the circulation (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How worrying is it that more and more teens are using e-cigarettes?
Many are alarmed by the fast-rising popularity of vaping among teenagers in the US. But experts are divided on whether e-cigarettes should be more tightly regulated (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

A meat tax may save thousands of lives and millions of dollars
A study suggests that a special tax could reduce meat consumption and prevent 220,000 deaths a year worldwide (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Hormone helps regrow frog legs and may one day lead to a human therapy
Frogs partly regrew their hind legs after a dose of the female sex hormone progesterone was applied to the wound site for just one day (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Gene therapy injection into spinal cord halts ALS in adult mice
A new way to deliver DNA to spinal nerve cells brings us a step closer to a gene therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Your gut is full of neurons and they are replaced every 2 weeks
A mouse study suggests most neurons in the intestines die every two weeks. An imbalance in the number of neurons could lead to gut diseases or even Parkinson ’s (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Don ’ t Miss: a dance in virtual space, playable painting and podcasts
Watch a powerful dance, play a painting created for the first world war centenary, listen to the latest about Saturn and read about the perils of our ever-cleaner homes (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Why air travel makes deadly disease pandemics less likely
Air travel may actually be reducing the risk of a deadly pandemic. This is because its harder for new microbes to stay isolated and become incredibly lethal (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Health risks increase for babies born to fathers aged 45 or over
Babies with fathers that are 45 years old or over are more likely to have a low birth rate, be admitted to an intensive care unit, or be born premature (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Spinal implants are getting better at reversing paralysis
People whose spines have been crushed have regained some mobility thanks to electrical stimulation that seems to encourage the brain to grow new nerve pathways (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Parkinson ’s disease may start in the appendix and travel to the brain
A  toxic compound that builds up in the appendix may trigger Parkinson's - and having your appendix out can lower the risk of developing the brain disorder (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Scotland ’s BSE case is a reminder that many more may be out there
A case of classical BSE was confirmed in Scotland this month. While the disease seems to be on the wane in the UK, many cases worldwide may be going undetected (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

People who gave up smoking cannabis had a memory boost within a week
Smoking cannabis can impair memory, but a new study has found that giving up can partially reverse the effect after several days (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The psychedelic science behind dreamy new Netflix hit, Maniac
Emma Stone and Jonah Hill cavort in multiple roles in a show exploring the use of hallucinogenic drugs to treat mental trauma and psychological disorders (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Creams remove skin sun spots with minimal pain and may prevent cancer
Sun spots – or actinic keratoses – are caused by UV light. Now people are using medicated creams to remove them before they have a chance to turn cancerous (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Sunshine seems to protect babies from eczema – but we don ’ t know why
Sunshine seems to prevent babies from getting eczema and is more effective than vitamin D supplements, but moderation is advised due to the risk of skin damage (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Trump is wrong – millions of Americans breathe badly polluted air
President Trump claims the US has the world ’s cleanest air, but he is ignoring urban pollution data while actively dismantling regulations that protect air quality (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Skin tans the most when spending every other day out of the sun
A study suggests your skin tans most when you spend every other day out of the sun, which has the added effect of reducing DNA damage and premature ageing (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Data suggests 60 per cent of babies aren ’ t breastfed after 6 weeks
Guidelines recommend breastfeeding for 6 months, but data suggests that less than half of mothers in England choose or are able to breastfeed beyond six weeks (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

WHO calls for ban on ‘virginity tests’, including those used by police
The World Health Organization wants governments worldwide to ban the ‘virginity tests’ used by some police, doctors and employers to assess women and girls (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

WHO calls for ban on ‘virginity tests’ used by police and employers
The World Health Organization wants governments worldwide to ban the ‘virginity tests’ used by some police, doctors and employers to assess women and girls (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Bone hormone released during exercise may lead to new memory-loss drug
Age-related memory loss might be reversed by boosting the effects of a hormone released by bones during exercise (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

New clues to unravelling link between pregnancy and breast cancer risk
Women are less likely to get breast cancer if they give birth before the age of 30. Now we know the effect kicks in specifically after 33 weeks of pregnancy (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Hot baths could improve depression as much as physical exercise
Taking a hot bath twice a week may help relieve mild depression. It may work by resetting circadian rhythms, which are often disrupted in people with depression (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Fasting power: Can going without food really make you healthier?
Fasting diets are getting ever more popular, amid promises of weight loss and better health, but does the science stand up? We put the latest one to the test (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Pregnancy changes how hundreds of genes work in a woman ’ s body
Genes that alter their expression during healthy pregnancies have been identified for the first time, potentially helping us to predict at-risk pregnancies (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Why plans to achieve zero suicides might actually be counterproductive
Health bodies and politicians are aiming for zero suicides, but doctors are warning this ambitious goal is simply unrealistic (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

2019 Breakthrough Prize winners set to receive share in $22 million
Silicon valley ’s Breakthrough Prize reveals the 21 scientists who have been recognized this year for work in drug design, biology, astrophysics, and mathematics (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Human placenta stem cells help people recover from hip surgery
The placenta is usually discarded after childbirth but it's a source of mesenchymal stem cells – and they help people regain muscle strength after hip surgery (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Nicotine exposure in male mice may trigger ADHD in their offspring
Mice are more active and have attention problems if their fathers had nicotine in their diet, perhaps because the chemical triggers epigenetic changes in sperm (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Half-hearted cannabis legalisation move leaves patients in limbo
Medical cannabis is to be available in the UK from November, but tight restrictions will drive patients to alternative sources, says Henry Fisher (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: cannabis classification drugs government law legalisation legislation marijuana medicine politics regulation schedule UK Source Type: research

Wheat flour to be fortified with folic acid in the UK
Folic acid helps prevent birth defects but is most effective taken around the time of conception. Adding it to wheat could benefit unplanned pregnancies (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We can harness algae with magnets to deliver drugs inside our bodies
If we attach tiny magnets to fast-swimming algae, we can load them up with drugs and steer them deep into the human body to deliver targeted medical therapies (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Contagion: How the world ’ s biggest flu pandemic makes sense as dance
Choreographer  Shobana Jeyasingh discusses her new dance work, a creation that is epic yet intimate and that straddles both the human scale and the submicrobial (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Mice eat too much food if their great grandmother did the same
When mice are given a high-fat diet their great grandchildren are more likely to put on weight – and they show a greater than expected taste for alcohol (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Police can now use millions more people ’ s DNA to find criminals
Consumer genetic databases are becoming powerful tools for identifying criminals, and a new technique could link you to forensic data held by US police (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We are a step closer to making babies with same-sex genetic parents
We are getting better at creating mice with same-sex parents but we are still nowhere near the point at which this could be attempted in people (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Medicinal cannabis will be available in the UK from next month
The UK Home Secretary has announced that doctors will be able to prescribe medicinal cannabis from next month following a specially commissioned review (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We need to get better at supporting people who lose a pregnancy
This week is Baby Loss Awareness Week, but more must be done to help those who, like me, have suffered a loss, says  Petra Boynton (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

What is ‘problem internet use’ and is it really a problem?
Researchers are calling for recognition of mental health problems caused by excessive gaming, gambling and social media, but lumping these together may not be right (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Naysayers rise to the top because we naturally treat them as leaders
Openly negative and critical people are often elected leaders, perhaps because we perceive their disregard for social niceties as a sign of power and independence (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Swallowing a vibrating capsule could help relieve constipation
Capsules that are programmed to vibrate when they reach the large intestine have been shown to stimulate bowel contractions and relieve chronic constipation (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research