Babies are more likely to be conceived in autumn but we don ’t know why
In the northern hemisphere, babies are most likely to be conceived in winter and least likely to be conceived in spring, according to an analysis of 14,000 women (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Coronavirus infections spike to 15,000 new Chinese cases in a day
China has reported a massive increase in the number of its citizens infected by the new coronavirus, after Chinese officials changed how cases were defined to include people who are less seriously ill (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We'll soon know if covid-19 can be treated with HIV and Ebola drugs
The results of clinical trials testing HIV and Ebola drugs in Chinese patients with covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, should be known in the next few weeks (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Why our understanding of concussion has been completely wrong
Concussion is often portrayed as " seeing stars " , which people quickly recover from. But we are now beginning to understand that the condition is far more serious, says Elizabeth Sandel (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

A woman with half a brain offers more proof of the organ's superpowers
From a teenager excelling with half a brain to the organ's visual areas being co-opted in people who are blind, our brain's ability to adapt continues to amaze (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Drugs may be able to fix our romantic lives when things go wrong
Are we ready for real-life love potions? Book Love is the Drug explains how pills may affect everything from falling deeper in love to breaking up (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Will the covid-19 coronavirus outbreak die out in the summer ’s heat?
It has been suggested the covid-19 outbreak could fade as the northern hemisphere warms, but we don ’t know if this is the case (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We discovered a coronavirus similar to the covid-19 virus 7 years ago
The covid-19 virus is similar to a coronavirus detected in bats in China back in 2013, but we failed to act on the warnings of those who studied it (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Teen born without half her brain has above average reading skills
An 18-year-old who was born without the left half of her brain scores well on IQ tests and plans to attend university, revealing our brain's incredible adaptability (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Coronavirus: How well prepared are countries for a covid-19 pandemic?
No country is fully prepared for a coronavirus pandemic, according to a public health expert. But some countries will be better placed to handle an outbreak than others (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How bad is the Covid-19 coronavirus outbreak likely to get?
The death rate of Covid-19, caused by the new coronavirus, may be lower than some estimates suggest, but the number of cases may be much higher (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Covid-19: The new coronavirus disease now officially has a name
The new coronavirus began spreading in China during December 2019, but the disease it causes has only now been officially named as Covid-19 by the World Health Organization (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Could the new coronavirus really kill 50 million people worldwide?
No one can say for sure how widely the new coronavirus will spread and how many it will kill because there are still many key things we don't know - not least the wider impact on healthcare services (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

African nations step up efforts to prevent spread of coronavirus
If the new coronavirus reaches Africa, it could have a huge impact. But the continent is getting ready, and 29 countries will soon be able to test for the infection (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Brain activity can help predict who'll benefit from an antidepressant
A machine-learning algorithm can predict who is most likely to respond best to an antidepressant by analysing the brain activity of people with depression (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Brain scans can help predict who'll benefit from an antidepressant
A machine-learning algorithm can predict who is most likely to respond best to an antidepressant by analysing the brain scans of people with depression (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Lyme disease cases may rise 92 per cent in US due to climate change
Climate change could nearly double new cases of Lyme disease by the end of the century in the US, even if the world manages to limit warming to levels agreed under the Paris climate deal (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

DNA firms are set to profit from your data as testing demand falls
23andMe and Ancestry are laying off staff as sales slump – but there’s plenty of profit to be made from their huge DNA databases (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

CRISPR cancer trial finds that gene-edited immune cells are safe
Three people with advanced tumours received a dose of CRISPR gene-edited immune cells and had no serious side effects, paving the way for more trials using this technique (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Coronavirus: Why I chose to stay in Wuhan rather than return to the UK
As governments evacuate foreign nationals from China, New Scientist speaks to a British man about life in Wuhan and why some people are choosing to stay (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Some people have extremely sweaty palms - but spraying Botox may help
Using high-pressure jet nozzles to fire liquid Botox into the skin could be a less painful alternative to injections to treat sweaty armpits and palms (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Overactive immune cells in babies may lead to childhood asthma
Babies whose immune cells produce more pathogen-fighting proteins are more likely to develop temporary or persistent asthma later in life (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

From alcohol to ketamine, what's the truth about recreational drugs?
Psychologist Suzi Gage is on a mission to uncover the truth and bust misconceptions about the drugs people take, and in the process find out the science behind them (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Coronavirus: Why infections from animals are such a deadly problem
The Wuhan coronavirus is the latest example of an infection that jumped from animals into humans – and when infections do this, they can be particularly deadly (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The flawed experiment that destroyed the world's faith in psychiatry
Fifty years ago, psychiatrist David Rosenhan went undercover in a psychiatric hospital to expose its dark side. But his shocking findings aren't what they seem, reveals Susannah Cahalan (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The three things we really need to know about the Wuhan coronavirus
We still don't know the death rate, the number of cases or how easily the Wuhan coronavirus spreads, making it difficult to predict how the outbreak will pan out (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Will the coronavirus become a pandemic - and what happens if it does?
The Wuhan coronavirus has exploded in China. There are three likely scenarios for what will happen next – and the bad news is that a pandemic looks difficult to avoid (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

What life is like in Wuhan during the coronavirus lockdown
Deserted streets, lines at pharmacies and overwhelmed hospitals – what life is like at the heart of China’s coronavirus epidemic (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Privacy of hundreds of thousands of genetic volunteers may be at risk
A team was able to uncover a dog's DNA in a research database - and it could mean the privacy of people who volunteer for genetic studies is at risk (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Contact lens senses UV light to tell you when it's time for sunscreen
Skin patches and contact lenses that change colour when exposed to UV light could provide us with a visual alert to apply sunscreen or seek some shade (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Yarn grown from human skin cells could be knitted into your body
A yarn-like material made from human skin cells could be used for surgery and complex tissue reconstruction without triggering an immune response (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Economic impact of coronavirus outbreak likely to eclipse SARS crisis
The economic shock waves of the coronavirus outbreak may eclipse those caused by the 2003 SARS pandemic, as analysts downgrade  forecasts for China's growth (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Why concerns of a teenage vaping epidemic may be overblown
The latest US vaping figures show that while experimentation with e-cigarettes is on the rise, regular use is still quite rare among teenagers (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

First cases of new coronavirus confirmed in the UK as disease spreads
Two members of the same family have tested positive for coronavirus in England, the UK Department of Health has confirmed (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

WHO declares coronavirus outbreak an international health emergency
Cases of human-to-human transmission of the Wuhan coronavirus have been confirmed in several countries, and the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

New coronavirus: How soon will a treatment be ready and will it work?
Developing new therapies to treat the Wuhan coronavirus could take a year or more, but there are some existing drugs and experimental treatments that might help save lives (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Vegetarians may have a lower risk of urinary tract infections
Vegetarianism may be linked to a lower risk of urinary tract infection, according to researchers who say it reduces exposure to harmful bacteria (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Pill with tiny needle for painless injections passes first human trial
A pill with a tiny needle that painlessly injects drugs directly into the intestine could replace conventional injections (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The Lighthouse: How extreme isolation transforms the body and mind
Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson play two characters who experience extreme isolation in the film The Lighthouse, which has a drastic effect on their minds (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Fast action will be key to containing new coronavirus from China
As the new virus that emerged in China spreads rapidly around the world, the reaction of national and international health agencies will be key to stopping it (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

New coronavirus looks set to cause a pandemic – how do we control it?
The new coronavirus looks set to go global as case numbers rise, but the variable way it seems to be spreading offers hope for keeping it under control (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

AI is being used to select embryos for women undergoing IVF
An AI that selects embryos with the highest chance of resulting in a successful pregnancy has been used by thousands of women undergoing IVF in Australia (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Human genes have been added to pigs to create skin for transplants
The race to create pigs organs for human transplants is hotting up. Three teams have each added human genes to pigs to try to create rejection-proof skin (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

BoJack Horseman shows just how unreliable memories can be
The final episodes of BoJack Horseman will be released this week. The dark comedy series has tackled just how fickle memories can be, as well as issues around mental health (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Can an N95 face mask protect you from catching the new coronavirus?
Face masks are reportedly selling out across China, as people try to protect themselves from the new coronavirus. But in some cases, it may be dangerous to wear certain masks (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

New coronavirus may be much more contagious than initially thought
The new coronavirus is spreading faster than SARS - and it may be because it can be passed on before a person shows any sign of symptoms (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

NHS may use people's phone data to predict mental health issues
A National Health Service trust has partnered with telecomms firm Telefonica to trial an algorithm that can identify people at risk of mental health crisis. A next step could see mobile phone data being used to make predictions (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

What are the symptoms of the new coronavirus and how deadly is it?
Everything you need to know about the Wuhan coronavirus that emerged in China and has caused over 600 cases so far (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Taking Viagra in early labour reduces the need for emergency caesarean
A study has found that taking Viagra at the beginning of labour increases blood flow to the baby and halves the chance of needing an emergency c- section (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Antibiotic resistance genes can be passed around by bacteria in dust
Disease-causing bacteria living in dust can pass antibiotic resistance genes to one another, a study of samples of dust in public buildings suggests (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research