Deaths from strokes in England have halved in just a decade
The rate of people dying from stroke in England decreased by 55 per cent between 2001 and 2010, according to an analysis of 800,000 patients (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Gut microbes may determine whether infants develop food allergies
Young immune systems may be particularly sensitive to food allergens in the absence of right gut bacteria, a study in mice suggests (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Specially created animal'cancer avatars' could personalise treatments
Flies, fish and mice are being developed into “cancer avatars” that carry the unique traits of a person’s cancer and help doctors choose which drugs to use (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Giving fruit flies your cancer ’s mutations could guide your treatment
Flies, fish and mice are being developed into “cancer avatars” that carry the unique traits of a person’s cancer and help doctors choose which drugs to use (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How antibiotic resistance is driven by pharmaceutical pollution
Factories in India making cheap antibiotics for the world are dumping their waste, with grim consequences for people living nearby – and global health too (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Rise in colon cancer seen in under-50s
Colorectal cancers seem to be becoming more common among younger people in rich countries (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Lyme disease is spreading across the US but your dog can help track it
Lyme disease is spreading as the climate warms. An analysis of veterinary records suggests our dogs ’ annual health checks can track infection’s across the US (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Women who have cardiac arrests are more likely to die than men
Women who have a cardiac arrest outside of hospital are less likely to be resuscitated by a bystander and more likely to die than men (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Contaminated blood scandal: Could some deaths have been prevented?
Campaigners are giving evidence to an inquiry into the haemophilia treatments that infected thousands of people with HIV and hepatitis C in the 1970s and 80s (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How Willem Einthoven gave doctors a window on the heart
Dutch physiologist Willem Einthoven invented the electrocardiogram (ECG), a way to record the heart ’s electrical activity with electrodes on the skin (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Compulsory vaccines are needed to keep measles under control in the UK
The UK should make measles vaccinations compulsory before children start school, according to an analysis of international measles data (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Alabama ’s extreme new law could lead to an end of US abortion rights
A wave of extreme abortion laws in the US has started a fight that could end with federal courts overturning abortion protections in place for nearly 50 years (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Centre for Cancer Drug Discovery to focus on anti-evolution treatments
Most people who die of cancer are killed by drug-resistant tumours. Can a new research centre focusing on developing anti-evolution treatments change that? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The quest for better snakebite treatments gets a funding boost
A multimillion-pound programme has been launched to improve treatment for snakebites, which are thought to kill up to 138,000 people each year (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Hearing device picks out right voice from a crowd by reading your mind
An experimental hearing aid can detect which voice someone wants to listen to in a crowded room by reading their mind (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Smartphone app that chirps in your ear could diagnose ear infections
Parents could use an app to check if their children have an ear infection. It works by making a soft chirping sound and analysing the echoes (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Can the UK avoid having a lethal opioid crisis like the one in the US?
Doctors in the UK are concerned that it could follow the US into an opioid crisis, yet measures to prevent this could go too far and leave people in pain (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

NHS hospital to trial genetic analysis for blood pressure patients
Around 100 people undergoing treatment for hypertension in the UK are to get their DNA analysed in a pioneering trial to see if genetic data can help healthcare  (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Shining a UV light on a special glue can repair heart wounds
Tests of a biodegradable glue reveals it can successfully stick wounds in heart tissue back together again and withstand high blood pressure (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Bacteria could identify month-old suspicious stains at crime scenes
Forensic investigators may be able to use a suspicious stain ’s microbiome to determine its origin, even after a month of being exposed to air (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Georgios Papanikolaou: inventor of the Pap smear cervical cancer test
The Pap smear cervical cancer test, which Georgios Papanikolaou developed by studying smears from his wife, was the first widely used screening test for cancer (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

George Papanicolaou: inventor of the Pap smear cervical cancer test
The Pap test, which George Papanicolaou developed by studying smears from his wife, was the first widely used screening test for cancer (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How Lucy Wills discovered a medical marvel in Marmite
The discovery that folic acid is important to the health of pregnant women is a classic story of serendipity in science (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Instagram is attempting to crack down on misinformation about vaccines
Instagram is trying to prevent misinformation about vaccinations spreading on the app by blocking hashtags that include " verifiably false " information (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Every country worldwide is now using the most effective polio vaccine
We may be on the brink of eradicating polio at last, now that Mongolia and Zimbabwe have added the inactivated polio vaccine to routine immunisations (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

My liver, your kidney: the world's first non-identical organ swap
To get her mother a new kidney, Aliana Deveza instigated the world ’s first swap of different organs between living donors, donating half her liver to a stranger (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

I gave away half my liver in exchange for a new kidney for my mother
To get her mother a new kidney, Aliana Deveza instigated the world ’s first swap of different organs between living donors, donating half her liver to a stranger (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Hormone treatment may help prevent miscarriages in some pregnancies
The hormone progesterone may help prevent miscarriages in women who experience bleeding in early pregnancy and have previously lost pregnancies (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Working hypothesis: From space deliveries to dirty money
Sorting the week ’s supernovae from the absolute zeros (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Are heat-not-burn tobacco products a safer alternative to cigarettes?
The rise of vaping has seen tobacco firms revisit an old cigarette alternative, but the health benefits are far from clear (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Thousands of people in Finland to receive genetic health predictions
A large genetic trial in Finland will soon tell 3400 volunteers their personal risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes and a type of blood clot (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Astronauts may have vision problems because of liquid in their brains
In microgravity, astronauts ’ brains fill with fluid and it doesn’t drain for months after they return to Earth, which may be why their vision worsens (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Genetic variants may put some athletes at higher risk of sudden death
People with one copy of a sickle cell gene are thought to have no health issues, but other gene variants may place carriers at a higher risk of sudden collapse (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Did Netflix ’s 13 Reasons Why really increase suicide rates?
A study shows that a rise in suicide among children age 10 to 17 occurred after Netflix ’s 13 Reasons Why was released, but the show may not be to blame (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Ebola outbreak in the DRC hits record number of cases in a single day
The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic Congo is the second deadliest ever, and has proven difficult to contain because of violent attacks in the region (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Two molecules could give us finer control over CRISPR gene editing
Molecules that act like off switches for CRISPR may one day be used as a drug to make gene editing therapies safer and less likely to cause unwanted mutations (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Eczema-associated bacteria may be kept in check by a different microbe
Eczema flare-ups are associated with bacteria that break the skin ’s barrier and cause inflammation – but a different type of bacteria can help fight it off (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Hormone therapy may improve some symptoms of autism
Two studies suggest that suppressing or boosting the hormone vasopressin may help communication skills and social interactions in autistic children and men (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Newly recognised form of dementia could now be easier to diagnose
Limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (LATE) is distinct from Alzheimer ’s disease and tends to affect people near the end of their lives (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Sales of opioid painkiller codeine have halved in Australia
Sales of codeine have halved in Australia after an over-the-counter ban and fears that people would be driven to stronger prescriptions have not come true (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

A bad sense of smell predicts early death but we don ’t know why
A poor sense of smell in older adults is linked to a nearly 50 per cent higher risk of death in the next 10 years, but the reasons for this are unclear (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Sensors made from gummy bears could monitor how children chew
A sensor made with a gummy bear could help researchers study how children chew. It's cheap to make and offers a tasty treat for the child being tested (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Peanut allergy immunotherapy may actually do more harm than good
Treatments intended to desensitise people to peanuts had shown promise in tests, but an analysis suggests they may make dangerous allergic reactions more likely (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

21 million children miss first dose of measles vaccine every year
An estimated 169 million children worldwide have missed out on getting the first dose of a measles vaccine, including more than half a million in the UK (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Robotic tube for surgery autonomously navigates inside a beating heart
A robotic catheter can move autonomously inside a heart to the location where surgery is required. It has a camera for vision and has been tested in 5 pigs (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Mind-reading device uses AI to turn brainwaves into audible speech
People's brainwaves have been converted into speech using electrodes on the brain. The method could one day help people speak who have lost the ability (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Anti-ageing has often been seen as quack science. Not any more
Ideas of living to 150 are dead and buried – but new anti-ageing drugs promise we can live healthier for longer. We should welcome them (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Anti-ageing drugs are coming that could keep you healthier for longer
Longevity research is no longer aimed at prolonging lives, it is trying to keep us fit right until the end. New anti-ageing drugs may finally be here to make that happen (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Genetically modified virus may shrink incurable brain cancers
People with incurable melanomas and brain or breast cancers are to receive injections of genetically modified viruses that may shrink their tumours (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Engineered virus to be tested as treatment for incurable cancers
People with incurable melanomas and brain or breast cancers are to receive injections of genetically modified viruses that may shrink their tumours (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research