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Eating fish as a child seems to protect you from hay fever
Infants who eat fish are less likely to develop hay fever later on, a finding that suggests changing diets have played a role in rising allergy rates (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Having children may add 11 years to a woman ’s biological age
Having a baby seems to be linked to shorter caps on the ends of a woman ’s chromosomes – a sign of ageing that has been linked to disease and a shorter lifespan (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Miniature personalised tumours could help you get the best chemo
Growing mini tumours in the lab from a patient ’s own cells could help doctors discover the best way to treat each person, homing in on the right drugs to use (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Bats spread Ebola because they ’ve evolved not to fight viruses
Bats can carry viruses like Ebola and Marburg that are lethal for humans. This may be because, in order to fly, their bodies have given up on fighting such viruses (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: biology disease evolution health Source Type: research

Almost every antidepressant headline you ’ ll read today is wrong
A review of the evidence on antidepressants has been hailed as the final word on these drugs, but questions remain for people with less severe depression (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Cycling in later life makes you less likely to have a bad fall
Riding a bike into your older years means stronger legs, better balance and a lower risk of falls that injure and kill millions of elderly people (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: health Source Type: research

Trigger warnings are taking over universities, but do they work?
Talk of trigger warnings and microaggressions are sweeping through university campuses, but some researchers question whether they have any psychological basis (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How you speak predicts if psychedelic therapy will help you
Psilocybin, a compound in magic mushrooms, may help treat depression in some people. Now speech analysis can  indicate who would benefit the most (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We ’ re evolving a gene that may stop us from drinking alcohol
Humans are still evolving and producing new gene variants, and one of them may give protection against becoming addicted to alcohol - by stopping us drinking altogether (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Electric eel-inspired batteries could power life-long pacemakers
A new battery made of fleshy hydrogel layers generates and stores power like electric eels do. It could power pacemakers without ever needing to be replaced (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Flu is evolving in new and unpredictable ways in China ’s poultry
A woman in China has been infected by a new type of flu. With thousands of people travelling after Chinese new year, the risk of new strains spreading is high (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

William Harvey: The delightful inside story of blood
He spent 10 painstaking years working out how our blood really circulates: 17th-century physician William Harvey deserves his own London exhibition (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Shampoo is causing air pollution, but let ’s not lose our heads
In Western cities, household products like deodorants and paints are a bigger source of air pollution than vehicle exhausts – so here’s what we need to do (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Stem cells zapped with radiation can protect mice from cancer
Injections of killed stem cells, designed to help the immune system recognise cancers, have been found to protect mice from developing tumours (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

CRISPR has fixed the genetic cause of a learning disability
CRISPR gene editing has been used to alleviate the genetic disorder fragile X syndrome, but the technique has only been tried in cells in a dish so far (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Surgical instruments may spread Alzheimer ’s proteins
Amyloid protein, which is linked to Alzheimer ’s disease, may be spread via surgical implements, but there isn’t evidence yet that this can transmit the disease (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Transgender woman is first to be able to breastfeed her baby
An experimental treatment regimen has enabled a transgender woman to exclusively breastfeed her baby for six weeks, during which time the baby grew healthily (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Valentine ’s Day seems to cause a mini baby-boom 9 months later
National Health Service data reveals that around Valentine ’s Day there is a 5 per cent rise in the number of babies conceived in England (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Opioid painkillers are prescribed more in northern England
The opioid crisis may have crossed the Atlantic, with signs that opioid painkillers are prescribed more in England in socially-deprived areas in the north (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The doctor who exposed the UK ’ s terrible experiments on patients
In the 1960s, British medics took sometimes fatal liberties with unsuspecting patients in the name of science. Maurice Pappworth wasn't having any of it (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Deadly superbugs are evolving to beat alcohol hand sanitisers
Alcohol-based hand sanitisers were introduced in hospitals to stop the spread of drug-resistant superbugs like MRSA. Now it seems the bacteria have got the upper hand (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We need to start taking vaping seriously as a way to save lives
E-cigarettes were once seen as a sinister cousin to ordinary smoking. Now doctors in the UK think they could be a public health lifeline (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Primitive human eggs matured in the lab for the first time
Human eggs have been removed in their most primitive state and brought to maturity in the lab for the first time, potentially boosting fertility treatments. (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: biology genetics health medicine Source Type: research

First glimpse of how genes may cause mental health problems
Geneticists are starting to unpick what causes psychiatric conditions like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and even some autism-like developmental conditions (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Fears of Brexit chaos for medicines agency should worry us all
Fresh turmoil threatens to worsen disruption of the European Medicines Agency when it quits the UK after Brexit. That should worry all parties, says  Inga Vesper (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The truth about what downing energy drinks really does to kids
Campaigners in the UK want energy drinks banned for under-16s. The latest scientific evidence suggests they are right - these drinks are uniquely bad for children (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Training parents to work in hospitals benefits premature babies
When the parents of premature babies in intensive care units are trained in basic nursing care and put to work, their infants put on weight more quickly (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

A much better asthma drug has shown promise in early experiments
Existing asthma drugs can fade in effectiveness and have side effects. But preliminary experiments suggest a new kind of drug could be more effective (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

I got DNA tested to see if I would pass on diseases to my kids
Many doctors now suggest people consider getting their DNA checked for genetic diseases before starting a family. Alice Klein decided to take the test (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We can now read the whole genome of a fetus in the womb
Knowing the ins and outs of our children's genetic secrets before they are born could help reduce the likelihood of many diseases - but could it be misused? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Some people with epilepsy can learn to stop their own seizures
Alertness training seems to help some people with epilepsy to stop themselves from having seizures, and has been linked to changes in their brain structure (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The unpalatable truth about your favourite foods
Marion Nestle has been fighting food industry giants for decades. Now she wants to expose the way they skew scientific research for their own gain (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Defence strategies: How immunology took its great leap forward
The Beautiful Cure sets the stage for a coming revolution in immunology, with fascinating stories of how researchers solved puzzles they didn ’t know existed (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

First UK three-parent babies could be born this year
Two cases have been approved in the UK for using a three-parent baby technique to make healthy babies. The technique has already been used in China and Ukraine (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Brain genes hint at why Zika doesn ’t always cause microcephaly
One in 10 babies exposed to the Zika virus during pregnancy develop abnormally small heads. A study of twins in Brazil suggests gene activity may decide which (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Pregnant women have to navigate a minefield of painkiller advice
I'm pregnant and sick of confusing advice about whether painkillers can harm developing fetuses - what should women like me do? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

At least three types of bacteria may help cause bowel cancer
Evidence is growing that bacteria can cause bowel cancer. Now two common species have been found to cause DNA damage, and have been linked to tumours in mice (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The love drug that could draw people away from any addiction
The "cuddle chemical" oxytocin boosts social bonds. Soon a version of it will be tested in pill form to see if it can reset the brain wiring that gets us hooked (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - February 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Depriving the brain of a sense may improve stroke recovery
Trimming the whiskers of mice suggests that blocking off some functions of the brain can help it rewire itself around stroke damage, speeding up recovery (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Trump ’ s 90-day plan for opioids has failed – here ’ s a better one
Deaths caused by accidental drug overdoses in the US now exceed those from motor vehicle incidents and guns. The government has been all talk and little action (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Time for the UK to stop dithering and add folic acid to bread
With yet more evidence in favour of fortifying flour with folic acid to help avoid serious birth defects, it's time the government acted, says Geoffrey Webb (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Can a brain implant treat Alzheimer ’ s? It might just be placebo
Alzheimer ’s disease may have been slowed in two people given implants that stimulate the brain with electricity, but this may just have been the placebo effect (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Veganism should be an informed and evidence-based choice
It is possible to get all the nourishment we need from a vegan diet, but without knowledge and discipline it is also possible to sleepwalk into nutritional deficiency (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Mediterranean diet linked to higher chance of successful IVF
A study of nearly 250 women in Greece suggests that a Mediterranean diet might increase the chances of successfully having a baby via IVF fertility treatment (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Pocket-sized scanner helps fill gaps in the human genome
A device barely bigger than a USB stick has produced the most complete human genome to date (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Vaping could cause cancer – but it’s still safer than smoking
When human lung and bladder cells are grown in the lab, they turn cancerous at a higher rate if exposed to nicotine compounds found in e-cigarettes (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Children get new ears grown from their own cells in world first
A team in China have 3D printed ear-shaped scaffolds which have been seeded with a child ’s own cells to create a personalised ear for transplantation (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Vaping could cause cancer – but it’s still safer than smoking
When human lung and bladder cells are grown in the lab, they turn cancerous at a higher rate if exposed to nicotine compounds found in e-cigarettes (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

What does China ’s monkey breakthrough mean for human cloning?
The creation of monkey clones is a big breakthrough, but making a copy of an adult is still not possible and the ethics of cloning remain unchanged (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Cycle for your supper on a gyro-spiraliser
Struggling to stay on top of your New Year's resolutions? Shred veg with this pedal-powered contraption (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - January 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research