Eating less red meat protects against endometriosis
Minimising red meat consumption seems to protect against endometriosis, according to a study of more than 80,000 women who were followed for two decades (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: diet endometriosis fertility health Source Type: research

Children seized at US border will face lasting health effects
The psychological and physical effects of serious trauma are likely to impact the children being separated from their families at the US border for years (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Black men are left out of cancer trials because of their biology
Prostate cancer is more common in African Americans, but they are less likely to be included in drug trials. Unintended biological biases are partly to blame (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

A huge number of mystery microbes are living on your skin
We thought we knew about most of the species in our bodies ’ microbiomes, but a study has revealed a large number of previously-unidentified organisms (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Special cells could let you control your diabetes with coffee
A cup of coffee after a meal might be enough to keep diabetes under control, thanks to caffeine-triggered cells that have been engineered to release insulin (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Time to end the cruel ban on using cannabis therapy for epilepsy
Ill-conceived and outdated drug laws in the UK are denying children with severe epilepsy vital medicinal cannabis treatments. That must change, says David Nutt (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

HIV prevention drugs could delay diagnosis if you get infected
HIV tests may be giving incorrect results for people taking PrEP to avoid getting the virus, meaning they may be HIV positive for months without knowing (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

A robot has performed eye surgery on humans for the first time
For the first time, six people have had  eye surgery performed by a robot that was able to filter out the tremors from a surgeon's hand (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Changing our minds about psychedelics takes a great guide
A book on learning to open our minds to psychedelics as they find a new, more scientific place in our society makes for a fantastic personal story (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Knowing your DNA can help you stick to a healthier lifestyle
When people are advised to live more healthily, they usually give up quickly. Now a study suggests that genetic data can persuade people to make lasting changes (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Mediterranean diet is still good for you but only if you ’re rich
A landmark study that touted the benefits of the Mediterranean diet has been retracted, but eating more fresh fish and veg is still good for you, if you can afford it (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

AI can detect early signs of Parkinson ’ s from brain scans alone
An AI could identify signs of Parkinson ’s from brain scans alone. One day it could be used to spot the disease before physical symptoms show (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Your brain absolutely cannot resist doughnuts – here ’ s why
Foods that are high in both carbohydrates and fats  super-charge the activity in our brain’s reward centre, explaining why we find them so appealing (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The truth about spices: Is it time to ditch the turmeric latte?
Spices are causing a stir as cheap and easy cure-alls for everything from diabetes to dementia, but not all the claims live up to the hype (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Is research in jails the way to end wars over dietary guidance?
US researchers say studies in prisons could firm up evidence on salt intake and health. The doubters will still doubt, say Mike Lean and Alastair Campbell (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The brain has a special clock that tracks sleepiness
A chemical clock has been found in the brains of mice that keeps track of how long it ’s been since an animal last slept, and how sleepy it should feel (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Psychedelics may help your brain cells form new connections
LSD and other members of the psychedelic family make neurons grow more branches, potentially explaining how they might treat depression (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: ayahuasca brain depression DMT drugs LSD magic mushrooms neuroscience psilocybin psychedelics Source Type: research

Gene editing embryonic stem cells might increase risk of cancer
Genome editing with CRISPR may select for cells with mutations in a key anti-cancer gene, but now we know of this risk it should be possible to ensure treatments are still safe (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Parkinson ’s disease may be caused by virus that kills gut bugs
People with Parkinson's  seem to have some differences in their gut microbiome - but is this cause or consequence? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

A self-balancing exoskeleton lets wheelchair users walk again
An exoskeleton is being tested that helped a wheelchair user to walk for several hours without pain. It supports its own weight and mimics the wearer ’s natural gait (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We can tweak immune cells to be much better at wiping out HIV
Studying the immune cells of people who can keep HIV under control in their bodies has yielded new insights that might enable all people with HIV to do the same (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Nipah: the unknown virus that could be the next pandemic threat
A virus most people have never heard of has killed 17 people in India, and disease experts are getting concerned (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Kidney cancer spreads by pretending to be white blood cells
Many people with cancer die from secondary tumours, and now we know how some cancer cells are able to spread around the body and move into other organs (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Party drugs are here to stay, but they don ’ t have to be killers
Crack downs on psychedelic substances are failing to protect people from harm. Drug tests at festivals and nightclubs to check they are legit could be a better way (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Anti-acne cream clears up skin without any nasty side effects
A new anti-acne cream that blocks inflammation is more effective and has fewer side effects than existing lotions, a clinical trial has found (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

4-year-olds care more about plants and animals than sick people
When we ’re young, we care less about people – so much so that 4-year-olds care less about teachers and police than they do about dogs, monkeys and rosebushes (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Woman survives metastatic breast cancer thanks to new treatment
A therapy that targets the immune system has had dramatic results in people with four types of cancer in advanced stages that were previously untreatable (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Zambia to kill 2000 hippos because they might spread anthrax
Over the next five years 2000 hippos are to be culled in Zambia, supposedly to stop them giving people anthrax, but the cull may inadvertently fuel the trade in hippo ivory (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: bacteria biology conservation disease environment Source Type: research

Zambia to kill 2,000 hippos because they might spread anthrax
Over the next five years 2,000 hippos are to be culled in Zambia, supposedly to stop them giving people anthrax, but the cull may inadvertently fuel the trade in hippo ivory (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: bacteria biology conservation disease environment Source Type: research

A whole new type of cancer therapy helps treat liver cancer
By making a gene in the liver work harder, a completely new type of drug has shown promise for treating cases of advanced liver cancer in a small trial (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

It ’s time we stopped dismissing women’s health problems
Controversy about cervical smear tests is just the latest in a series concerning women ’s health. It’s time to talk about inequality in the doctor’s surgery (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Model Behaviour: How a sceptic was won over by life in the lab
A new book about shadowing a team of behavioural geneticists shows them at great pains to capture the vagaries and complexities of their tricky research (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We ’re beginning to understand how some people can control HIV
A few people are able to keep the HIV virus in check for decades without getting ill. At last we ’re beginning to understand what’s special about their bodies (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

So-called ‘holy grail’ cancer test would miss thousands of cases
Newspaper reports have hailed a blood test for detecting several types of cancer as the “holy grail of cancer research”, but it is far from accurate enough (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Can an app tell if you have dementia years before your doctor?
Many games and apps claim to identify the earliest signs of dementia – if they work, we might be able to catch the condition early enough to treat it (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

People with big brains have a different brain structure too
If you have a large brain, certain regions are much bigger than expected and others are smaller – but we don’t know how this affects intelligence yet (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Art that brings meaning to medicine
Edinburgh's Surgeons' Museums have launched their new art programme with a show by Chinese artist Zhang Yanzi that's at once sincere and spectacular (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

US ‘ right to try ’ drugs law could hurt terminally ill people
A new law in the US allows terminally ill people access to unproven medicine, but it ’s not clear who will pay if treatments go horribly wrong (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

There ’ s no such thing as a ‘ detox ’ – so let ’ s ban the word
Using the word detox to promote drinks such as tea as well as food and other products is essentially meaningless. Time to give it a rest, says Anthony Warner (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Ambien can cause bizarre behaviour – but not racist tweets
Roseanne Barr has blamed the sleeping pill Ambien for her racial attack on a former Obama adviser. The drug is known to cause a range of strange side effects (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Drugs that help our cells tidy up might extend lifespan
Ramping up the body ’s ability to remove damaged cells has been found to stave off organ damage and cancer in mice – could a drug get the same effect in humans? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Women aren ’ t being told real risks of cervical cancer screening
Efforts to prevent cervical cancer seem so straightforward that few women question them, but unnecessary treatment can cause miscarriages and premature births (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The cancer-fighting multi-organ: 9 ways the placenta is amazing
From helping us conquer the world to curing cancer, here are nine reasons why the placenta deserves our appreciation (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

GM golden rice gets approval from food regulators in the US
The genetically modified rice, designed to prevent blindness in undernourished children, was judged safe to eat last week by the US Food and Drug Administration (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Brains grow brand new neurons after experimental drug injection
We make very few new brain cells as adults, but a chemical cocktail that creates new neurons in mice could change that, and help treat Alzheimer ’s and stroke (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Faulty placenta may explain why some people get schizophrenia
A poorly-working placenta may affect brain development in the womb, and this could explain the link between pregnancy complications and schizophrenia (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Frozen placentas could be the ticket to a long and healthy life
Placentas are usually discarded, yet they are packed full of stem cells. Now Bob Hariri and XPrize founder Peter Diamandis aim to harness their potential (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We can ’t trick people into accepting genetically modified foods
With new GM foods quietly reaching the shops, we must ensure consumers have the information to make real choices (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Dentists can smell your fear – and it may put your teeth at risk
A study of sweaty T-shirts suggests dentists can smell when someone is anxious, and it makes them more likely to make mistakes and damage neighbouring teeth (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How a change in tactics could help autism research
For some, symptoms of autism can hamper their daily lives, but drugs to mitigate these have floundered during trials. Shafali Jeste has an idea of why (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research