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Common condition endometriosis reprograms brain for depression
Endometriosis causes symptoms of mental health problems in mice, and the one in ten women who have the condition are more likely to have depression or anxiety (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Gene drives can beat pests, but we can ’t afford any mistakes
Invasive pests could be eliminated by so-called gene drives, but we must make sure they can ’t spread beyond our control (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Why we should celebrate Scotland ’s minimum alcohol price plan
Death and ill health will be averted now Scotland's pioneering minimum alcohol policy has finally cleared legal hurdles, say John Holmes and Petra Meier (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Brain training game linked to lower dementia risk a decade later
Could just ten sessions of brain training be enough to lower your risk of dementia by 29 per cent a decade later? A study suggests so, but some are sceptical (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Amish gene can make them live 10 years longer and avoid diabetes
A gene variant that arose six generations ago in an Amish group seems to make people carrying the gene live ten years longer, and protect them from diabetes (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We ’ re heading for a male fertility crisis and we ’ re not prepared
Fertility has been considered a woman's problem for so long, but sperm counts are dropping and men have a ticking clock too. It's time to redress the balance (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

NHS reforms have failed to boost community-based care in England
Re-organising the National Health Service in England has failed to reduce the proportion of people being referred for expensive hospital treatments (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How long should you let a pregnancy run before being induced?
If your pregnancy runs past its due date, how long should you wait for a natural birth? It may be safer to induce at 40 weeks, for older mums at least (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Coffee and plant-based diets linked to lower heart failure risk
Drinking coffee, and diets consisting mostly of vegetables, fruit, beans and whole grains, have both been linked to a lower risk of developing heart failure (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

How social stress makes your brain vulnerable to depression
Bullying and other social stresses may make it easier for inflammatory substances to enter your brain, altering your mood and leaving you susceptible to depression (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Brain implant boosts human memory by mimicking how we learn
A device that zaps the brain with electricity has improved people ’s scores on memory tests. It may have the power to help dementia, or boost other brain skills (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Exclusive: Brain implant boosts human memory for the first time
A device that zaps the brain with electricity has improved people ’s scores on memory tests. It may have the power to help dementia, or boost other brain skills (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Medical cannabis vendors must stop making bogus health claims
There are enough real benefits of medical marijuana, so why are people making them up? It ’s time to stop overhyping what weed can do (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Gluten-sensitive? It may actually be a carb making you ill
Rather than gluten, fructan molecules seem to be to blame for sensitive guts. If true, gluten-free people could eat soy sauce and sourdough bread again (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

State of unrest: Can fidgeting really help you concentrate?
Once seen as a sign of boredom, fidgeting is now touted as a way to boost focus, help kids with ADHD or even lose weight. Should we believe the hype? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Daytime injuries heal twice as fast as wounds sustained at night
Burn injuries sustained during the day take an average of 11 days less to heal than night-time burns (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Boy with a genetic disease has had almost all his skin replaced
Gene therapy has saved the life of a boy with a rare skin-peeling disease. The boy received grafts of sheets of genetically-altered skin grown in the lab (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

China ’s dreadful air pollution seems to have got a bit better
While China ’s capital Beijing is once again suffering a severe smog, a new study suggests that nationally pollution has fallen 21 per cent over two years (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: disease energy environment health Source Type: research

Blood cells in chronic fatigue syndrome are drained of energy
Cells from people with chronic fatigue syndrome fail to meet even modest energy demands, adding to evidence that the disease is physiological, not psychological (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Your brain signals weaken and slow down when you ’re really tired
We ’ve seen how sleep deprivation disrupts the way neurons communicate with each other, and it may explain why a bad night’s sleep makes it hard to concentrate (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Old Scientist: Why aren ’t there more British Nobels?
Why did a maverick British astronomer never get the gong? New Scientists of Novembers past reveal it ’s a perennial worry (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Anorexia films and documentaries must avoid being voyeuristic
At last, Louis Theroux's Talking to Anorexia documentary offered a rare, nuanced take on one of the deadliest mental illnesses, says Lara Williams (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Blood cells in chronic fatigue syndrome are drained of energy
Cells from people with chronic fatigue syndrome fail to meet even modest energy demands, adding to evidence that the disease is physiological, not psychological (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Breathing pure oxygen could heal footballers with concussion
Up to 5 per cent people who are concussed suffer long-term health problems. Research suggests that  bouts of hyperbaric oxygen therapy might help (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

People with face blindness are missing a ‘hub’ in their brains
People who can ’t recognise faces have massive differences in how their brains are connected, which could be identified early in life to help kids circumvent the disorder (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The latest science reads remind us why we really do need experts
Mary Halton reflects on how books on forecasting, rock-reading and the grisly world of Victorian medicine highlight how we have always relied on those in the know (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: biology books and art economics environment health politics Source Type: research

Is modern life making today ’ s teenagers more depressed?
The media is full of stories about a teenage mental health crisis, but the reality is more complex. The real problem is we don't do enough to help those who need it (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Australia to cut cervical cancer risk with less regular tests
From 1 December, instead of the 2-yearly Pap smear – also known as a Pap test or smear test – Australian women will have a 5-yearly human papillomavirus (HPV) test instead (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

First results from young blood Alzheimer ’s trial are criticised
The results from the first trial of young blood as a treatment for Alzheimer ’s have been announced, but how the study was done is coming under criticism (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Inside the mind of the man who wants to transplant human heads
Neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero likens himself to Peter Parker and Victor Frankenstein, and controversially claims that a successful human head transplant is imminent (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Alzheimer ’s may be able to spread through blood transfusions
A protein might be capable of spreading Alzheimer ’s through blood transfusions and surgical equipment, but we don’t know yet how much of a risk this is (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Climate change will kill millions but you knew that already
It ’s no surprise, but an analysis has predicted deadly heatwaves, more deaths from starvation, and a boom in mosquito-borne diseases thanks to climate change (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Donor organs created by dissolving and rebuilding pig livers
A liver grown in a lab by dissolving cells in a pig organ and then reinfusing it with new ones offers hope that we could create transplant organs on demand (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Hey Trump, the 1970s called and it wants its drug policies back
President Trump is right to declare the opioid crisis an emergency but his strategy is a mishmash of failed policies from last century, says Samantha Murphy (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

A legal trade in rhino horn could be twice as big as illegal one
Legalising the trade in rhino horn from South Africa could match black market supply and maybe even double it, with the aim of driving poachers out of business (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Head transplant mavericks must be scrutinised, not ignored
Whether or not you believe neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero and his claims about head transplants, journalism has a democratic duty to hold public figures up to the light (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Robot carers are a reality: I only wish my mum got one
A care bot's deployment in the UK has come under fire, but I would have welcomed robotic help for my elderly mother, says author Paul Kitcatt (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Space changes how your brain thinks and it starts right away
Just a few minutes of microgravity is enough to change your brain. This suggests space tourists and long-haul astronauts may need to take precautions to think straight (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Opioid crisis: Trump suggests telling young people drugs are bad
Trump has declared the US opioid crisis a national public health emergency. He thinks telling young people that it ’s “really easy not to take them” will help (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Ban on weedkiller glyphosate won ’ t save anyone from cancer
Unfounded health fears mean Europe is on the brink of banning the herbicide, risking greater soil damage and higher carbon emissions (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Brain-zap therapy may throw people with depression into a rage
Stimulating the brain to treat depression can spark a fit of fury in a small number of people, psychiatrists warn (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Good news: A robot has been hired to care for our old folk
A care bot's deployment in the UK has come under fire, but I would have welcomed robotic help for my elderly mother, says author Paul Kitcatt (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Gaming addiction probably isn ’t a real condition, study suggests
Very few gamers really meet the proposed criteria for internet gaming disorder – instead they may play excessively to fill gaps in other areas of their life (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

What drove the WHO to make Robert Mugabe a goodwill ambassador?
The new head of the World Health Organization caused a backlash by handing Zimbabwe's despotic leader a role. Why did he make such a misstep, wonders Luke Allen (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - October 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: health politics Source Type: research