Including population control in climate policy risks human tragedy
Making population issues part of the world's efforts to avert climate change could cause human rights abuses including forced sterilisation, says  Ian Angus (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

An opt-out organ donor system might actually lead to fewer transplants
England ’s plans to make everyone an organ donor by default could make families less likely to give consent, perhaps leading to a fall in transplant operations (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Exposure to insecticide DDT linked to having a child with autism
Although DDT has been banned for decades in many countries, exposure to its breakdown products may be influencing whether mothers have autistic babies (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

No contraceptive is perfect, but can you trust apps to stop pregnancy?
Birth control app Natural Cycles has come under fire for unwanted pregnancies, but this just reveals how little we understand contraception (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Doctors will grow human tissue on the International Space Station
Liver tissue and muscle fibre are going to be grown on the ISS, to see if we can one day grow human organs in space (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Sticking brain cells together with glue could boost and protect memory
Can a chemical that reinforces the connections in our brains prevent the destruction of memories in ageing and Alzheimer ’s? It seems to work in mice (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

There is no evidence that the weedkiller glyphosate causes cancer
Agrichemical firm Monsanto has been ordered to pay $289 million to a man who says its products caused his cancer – but scientific evidence for links to cancer is lacking (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Why allergies aren ’t nuts at all
Faced with airline peanut bans, it ’s easy to dismiss allergies as imaginary modern maladies. They’re not – and we need to understand why they’re on the up (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

This doctor risked her career to end Flint ’s water-poisoning crisis
The people of Flint, Michigan, were drinking poisoned water, and the authorities were doing nothing. That ’s when Mona Hanna-Attisha decided to take action (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Cybersecurity is failing us – and will continue to do so unless we act
Our current model of internet security is too vulnerable to the mistakes of individual programmers. Better alternatives exist – and should be deployed (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Buzz: A beautiful book shows why modern bees are hippy wasps at heart
A beautifully illustrated new book details the evolutionary path that created modern bees from their ancient wasp ancestors - and why the apians ’ future is uncertain (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Tools reveal Easter Island may not have had a societal collapse
Tools used to make Easter Island ’s famous statues have yielded a clue that suggests the Rapa Nui inhabitants that made them all got along with each other (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Don ’ t miss: Taxidermied rabbits, mucky biology and the digital future
See a taxidermied rabbit in a silver goblet at show about human-animal hybrids, read about biology's muckier side, and listen to tough talk about our digital future (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Gluten-free dogs? Pets deserve better than this evidence-free fad
Animal owners are increasingly falling for potentially risky fad pet diets or homeopathic alternatives to vaccines, warn vets Danny Chambers and Zoe Belshaw (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Fortnite is coming to Android, but players risk downloading malware
When blockbuster game Fortnite hits Android phones, gamers will be able to get it outside Google Play, which could leave them vulnerable to scams (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Preserved ocean creatures make landfall in London
Dissected and preserved  sea life specimens give visitors a thrilling, slightly shallow glimpse of a hidden world (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Bots on Amazon ’ s Mechanical Turk are ruining psychology studies
Psychologists use Amazon ’s Mechanical Turk platform to study our behaviour, but now bots are spoiling things by pretending to be human (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

This man spent months alone underground – and it warped his mind
Michel Siffre ’s extraordinary self-experiments in a cave with no light would never be allowed now – but revealed strange truths about how we perceive time (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The Meg: Real Megalodon shark would eat Jason Statham for breakfast
Jason Statham ’s new film The Meg looks gloriously silly and good luck to it, but it got us thinking about what its giant prehistoric shark was really like and why it died out (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

New Scientist Live: sneak preview of this year ’s mission to Mercury
It ’s time to return to the planet Mercury. At New Scientist Live, Emma Bunce will be revealing all about the BepiColombo mission set to launch in October (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

New Zealand becomes the latest country to ban plastic bags
People in New Zealand currently use about 150 plastic bags each a year, but the country now plans to phase them out within the next six months (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Feedback: What would happen if Earth was made of blueberries?
Thanks to science, we now have an answer. Plus: a stolen shark, mapping the Kessel Run, TripAdvisor reviews of migrating animals, and more (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Allergy explosion: What causes allergies and how to avoid them
We've all heard that being too clean can cause allergies, or exposure can help you beat them. Most advice doesn't stand up, but there are things that do seem to work (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

We have measured the speed of death and it ’s 2 millimetres an hour
Biologists have watched death spread across a living cell for the first time, and discovered that it travels in a steady wave in the same way that wildfires do (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

High-speed electrons prove Einstein was right about the speed of light
Albert Einstein predicted that the speed of light does not change just because you are moving – and now two experiments have shown just how right he was (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Allergy explosion: The truth behind the most common myths
You can grow into and out of allergies your whole life; they come in groups; women are more allergy prone... Wild ideas about allergies abound, but which should you believe? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Alien grass is making California wildfires three times as frequent
Non-native grasses such as cheatgrass are easier to ignite and can spread fires far more quickly than the native ones (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Allergy explosion: The truth behind the most common myths
You can grow into and out of allergies your whole life; they come in groups; women are more allergy prone... Wild ideas about allergies abound, but which should you believe? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Uncrackable computer chips stop malicious bugs attacking your computer
Cyberattacks target not just our phones and laptops, but hospitals, schools and power stations. A new security solution redesigns chips from the inside out (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Another supervolcano in California is not as dormant as we thought
The Long Valley Caldera in east California unleashed a supervolcano eruption 760,000 years ago. Today it is quiet but it may have a few smaller eruptions left in it (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Tight underwear really is linked to lower sperm counts in men
Men who wear boxer shorts have higher sperm  levels than men who wear tight underwear, although the difference shouldn't usually be enough to affect fertility (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: boxers briefs fertility health men pants sperm underwear Source Type: research

Inducing labour at 39 weeks leads to fewer emergency Caesareans
It has been thought that inducing labour leads to more C-sections, but a study of over 6,100 women suggests this isn ’t the case when induced at 39 weeks (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

‘ Hey ’ : short messages are the best dating site strategy, study says
  An analysis of online dating has found most users hit on people who are 25 per cent more attractive than them, and that shorter messages have better reply rates (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Ecstasy-like drugs might relieve social difficulties in autism
Mouse studies hint that social difficulties in autism might be caused by faulty serotonin signalling in the brain and can be helped with serotonin-boosting drugs (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Police can now track killers using relatives ’ DNA – but should they?
Genetic genealogy services are rapidly becoming a key source of forensic evidence, but do we really want the police to have access to everyone's DNA? (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Ecstasy-like drugs might relieve social difficulties in autism
Mouse studies hint that social difficulties in autism might be caused by faulty serotonin signalling in the brain and can be helped with serotonin-boosting drugs (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Don ’t give up, we can survive even a Hothouse Earth
Bad news on the climate should lead neither to despair nor unfounded optimism. Instead, we need to roll up our sleeves and prepare for life on a drastically changing planet (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

The underwater drones that hunt for oil spills beneath the waves
Oil behaves strangely in water – now a combination of AI and super-expensive underwater vehicles are being used to track it. Joshua Howgego went along for the ride (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

US Navy wants to fire a slime cannon at boats to stop them escaping
The US Navy wants to make super-expanding weaponised slime, inspired by the hagfish,   that can trap boats in the water (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Allergy explosion: What causes allergies and how to avoid them
We've all heard that being too clean can cause allergies, or exposure can help you beat them. Most advice doesn't stand up, but there are things that do seem to work (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Allergy explosion: They are on the rise, and here ’s why
Banning nuts on planes and in schools may seem like hysteria, but there's good reason: allergies are becoming more common. And you may not realise how you're affected (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

California ’ s worst wildfire in history is now the size of Los Angeles
Firefighters are battling high winds and extreme heat as they try to slow the spread of the biggest wildfire ever recorded in California (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Neutron stars bend light so much we see their front and back at once
Ultra-compact neutron stars are so dense that the light bends around from the far side, making it possible to see all sides of them simultaneously (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Sound waves are a form of antigravity because they have negative mass
As sound waves travel, they float upwards away from the pull of gravity. That ’s because they have negative mass, so they’re repelled by massive objects (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research

Future heatwaves will knock nuclear, gas and coal power plants offline
Power plants are shutting down in the northern hemisphere due to a lack of cool water, and the problem will only get worst in a warming and drier world (Source: New Scientist - Health)
Source: New Scientist - Health - August 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research