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Father–child closeness and conflict: Validating measures for nonresident fathers.
A child’s relationship with his or her nonresident father has been found to be related to that child’s development in important ways. However, validated measures of the relationship between nonresident fathers and their children are rare, particularly for low-income nonresident fathers. To provide guidance for researchers and practitioners evaluating nonresident fatherhood programs, this study uses a sample of 420 primarily low-income nonresident fathers to examine the reliability, convergent validity, and predictive validity of measures of father–child closeness and conflict contained in the Child–...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Zooming in: A microanalysis of couples’ dyadic coping conversations after experimentally induced stress.
Growing evidence that social support in times of stress is crucial for well-functioning relationships raises important questions about how intimate partners elicit specific forms of supportive behavior. To explore the process of support elicitation, we exposed either the male or female partner in a relationship to a standardized laboratory stressor (N = 127 couples), videotaped their subsequent reunion, and then coded those interactions at a microanalytic level to investigate links between expressions of stress and partner responses to those expressions. Multilevel analyses indicated that the type of stress expression serv...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Longitudinal links between work experiences and marital satisfaction in african american dual-earner couples.
This study assessed associations between both work demands (pressure, hours) and work resources (self-direction) and marital satisfaction in a sample of 164 African American dual-earner couples who were interviewed annually across 3 years. Grounded in the work–home resources and family systems frameworks, results from longitudinal actor–partner interdependence models (APIM) revealed main effects of spouses’ work experiences on their own marital satisfaction, but these effects were qualified by the interactive effects of spouses’ and partners’ work experiences. Some interactive effects were con...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Using the factor of curves model to evaluate associations among multiple family constructs over time.
Research in family psychology often focuses on understanding how multiple familial constructs develop over time. To examine these developmental processes, researchers frequently use a multivariate latent growth model (LGM) in which univariate LGMs are specified for each individual construct and then correlations are examined between the slopes and intercepts of different pairs of constructs. However, if the developmental associations among the constructs are hypothesized to derive from a higher-order common “cause” or factor, then a more appropriate model is the factor of curves (FOCUS) model. In this paper, we...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Intergenerational continuity in attitudes: A latent variable family fixed-effects approach.
Attitudes are associated with behavior. Adolescents raised by parents who endorse particular attitudes are relatively more likely to endorse those same attitudes. The present study addresses conditions that would moderate intergenerational continuity in attitudes across 6 domains: authoritative parenting, conventional life goals, gender egalitarianism, deviancy, abortion, and sexual permissiveness. Hypothesized moderators included the attitudes of the other parent, and adolescent sex. Data come from a 2-generation study of a cohort of 451 adolescents (52% female), a close-aged sibling, and their parents. After employing a ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Examining inter-family differences in intra-family (parent–adolescent) dynamics using grid-sequence analysis.
Family systems theorists have forwarded a set of theoretical principles meant to guide family scientists and practitioners in their conceptualization of patterns of family interaction—intra-family dynamics—that, over time, give rise to family and individual dysfunction and/or adaptation. In this article, we present an analytic approach that merges state space grid methods adapted from the dynamic systems literature with sequence analysis methods adapted from molecular biology into a “grid-sequence” method for studying inter-family differences in intra-family dynamics. Using dyadic data from 86 paren...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Using technology to enhance and expand interventions for couples and families: Conceptual and methodological considerations.
Technological advances provide tremendous opportunities for couple and family interventions to overcome logistical, financial, and stigma-related barriers to treatment access. Given technology’s ability to facilitate, augment, or at times even substitute for face-to-face interventions, it is important to consider the appropriate role of different technologies in treatment and how that may vary across specific instances of technology use. To that end, this article reviews the potential contributions of telemental health (aka, telehealth; e.g., videoconferencing to remotely deliver real-time services) and asynchronous ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Conceptual and statistical issues in couples observational research: Rationale and methods for design decisions.
This article describes conceptual and statistical considerations involved in these 3 areas of research and presents principle- and empirically based rationale for design decisions related to these issues. A unifying principle underlying these guidelines is the need for careful consideration of fit between theory, research questions, selection of coding systems, and creation of coding teams. Implications of (mis)fit for the advancement of theory are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Introduction to the special issue: Advances in methods and measurement in family psychology.
This special issue presents a collection of reports that highlight recent advances in methods and measurement and also shed light on the complexity of family psychology. The importance of theory in guiding solid family science is evident throughout these reports. The reports include guides for researchers who incorporate direct observation into their research protocols and the ever-expanding field of tele-health interventions. Advanced analytic approaches are offered in the areas of grid sequence analysis, latent fixed-effects models, and the Factors of Curves Model (FOCUS). These sophisticated analytic approaches may be a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Socialization of coping in a predominantly female sample of caregivers: Contributions to children’s social adjustment in middle childhood.
This study applied a short-term longitudinal design to examine whether socialization of coping, observed in real time, predicted social adjustment (i.e., friendship quality and social problems) in middle childhood. Further, this study explored whether socialization of coping contributed to children’s social adjustment independent of other aspects of parenting (i.e., positive involvement, autonomy support). Parents’ (primarily mothers’) coping suggestions were observed while children completed a challenging star-tracing task, and children and parents reported on children’s social adjustment at baseli...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Piloting relationship education for female same-sex couples: Results of a small randomized waitlist-control trial.
Relationship education represents a promising, nonstigmatizing approach to promoting the health and stability of same-sex couples. A new culturally sensitive adaptation of relationship education was developed specifically for female same-sex couples (The Strengthening Same-Sex Relationships Program, Female version; SSSR-F). SSSR-F includes adaptations of evidence-based strategies to build core relationship skills (e.g., communication skills training) as well as new content to address unique challenges faced by this population (e.g., discrimination; low social support). A small randomized waitlist-control trial (N = 37 coup...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Coparenting relationship trajectories: Marital violence linked to change and variability after separation.
Associations between marital intimate partner violence (IPV) and postseparation coparenting relationship trajectories were examined among 135 mothers who participated in 5 interviews at 3-month intervals in the year following their divorce filing. Growth curve analysis was conducted to assess change and variability in coparenting dimensions (i.e., conflict, support, communication about child rearing, and harassment) in the overall sample and by type of IPV. In the overall sample, coparenting conflict, communication about child rearing, and harassment decreased across the year following separation. However, coparenting rela...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Constellations of dyadic relationship quality in stepfamilies: A factor mixture model.
Stepfamilies are an increasingly common family form, marked by distinct challenges, opportunities, and complex networks of dyadic relationships that can transcend single households. There exists a dearth of typological analyses by which constellations of dyadic processes in stepfamilies are holistically analyzed. Factor mixture modeling is used to identify population heterogeneity with respect to features of mother–child, stepfather–child, nonresident father–child, and stepcouple relationships using a representative sample of 1,182 adolescents in mother–stepfather families with living nonresident fa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Adolescents’ responses to marital conflict: The role of cooperative marital conflict.
Not all youth exposed to hostile marital interactions develop negative responses to marital conflict. Cooperative marital conflict has long been considered as an important way of managing conflict and may serve as an important context in which hostility might convey during marital interactions. In light of little prior attention placed on the positive side of conflict processes, the main and moderating effects of cooperative marital conflict on youth responses to marital conflict were examined in a sample of 416 2-parent families using a multimethod, 2-year prospective design. Cooperative marital conflict was associated wi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Patterns of interparental conflict, parenting, and children’s emotional insecurity: A person-centered approach.
We examined the relations between interparental conflict (destructive and constructive), parenting behaviors (harshness and supportiveness) and children’s emotional insecurity in early childhood when children were approximately 36 months of age. The sample consisted of low-income unmarried couples who were expectant/new parents who participated in the national Building Strong Families project. Interparental conflict was assessed through parents’ reported perception of the other parent’s conflict behavior. Parenting behaviors were measured through observational data, and children’s emotional insecuri...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Trans and gender-nonconforming children and their caregivers: Gender presentations, peer relations, and well-being at baseline.
This study, involving a community-based sample of 45 predominantly white primary caregivers of 45 trans and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) children between 6 and 12 years of age, provides descriptive data on children’s gender presentations, peer relations, and well-being. Most (n = 31; 69%) of the children were cross-gender identified (CGI). That is, 17 of 28 children assigned male at birth explicitly and consistently identified as girls, and 14 of 17 children assigned female at birth explicitly and consistently identified as boys. The 14 remaining children appeared to have nonbinary gender identities (e.g., “boy-...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Parting Parent Concern Inventory: Parents’ appraisals correlate with divorced family functioning.
When married parents go through a divorce, they may have concerns in 6 areas that are associated with postdivorce family adjustment. These include concerns about malice, power, custody, child rejection, esteem, and finances. The Parting Parent Concern Inventory assesses these concerns. It was developed in a series of preliminary studies, and this report focuses on results from 2 subsequent validation studies including 643 divorced parents with at least 1 child from their former marriage under the age of 18. Participants completed Internet assessments of their concerns and 14 different convergent validity criterion variable...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Ethnic differences in mothering qualities and relations to academic achievement.
Although qualities of mothering behavior have been consistently linked with children’s academic outcomes, mothers from different ethnic groups may emphasize different dimensions with their children. The present investigation aims to evaluate and compare the dimensionality of mothering in low-income African American (n = 151) and Mexican American (n = 182) mothers during early childhood and its predictive utility for children’s academic achievement. Video-recorded mother–child interactions with children at 2½ and 3½ years of age were rated using 6 mothering quality items from a widely used gl...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Spillover between interparental conflict and parent–child conflict within and across days.
The present study used a daily reporting design to examine the bidirectional spillover in conflict and conflict strategies between the interparental relationship and the parent–child relationship. Participants were 60 parents with a preadolescent child at risk for aggressive behavior. Parents reported on their experience of interparental and parent–child conflict and their use of constructive and destructive conflict strategies through daily telephone interviews over 7 days. Each day was divided into 3 equal time periods roughly corresponding to early morning, daytime, and evening. Time-lagged analyses investig...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Interplay between children’s biobehavioral plasticity and interparental relationship in the origins of internalizing problems.
The present study demonstrates the interplay between interparental relationship satisfaction and child plasticity in the origins of internalizing problems in 99 community mothers, fathers, and children. Our cumulative measure of plasticity integrated genetics (5-HTTLPR polymorphism), psychophysiology (skin conductance level), and observed behavior (inhibition, sadness, joy). The interaction between plasticity and interparental relationship satisfaction reflected differential susceptibility. Compared with low-plasticity peers, high-plasticity children had more internalizing problems from 5.5 to 12 years when the interparent...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The legacy of early childhood violence exposure to adulthood intimate partner violence: Variable- and person-oriented evidence.
This study examined prospective pathways from exposure to interparental violence (EIPV) during infancy (ages 0–24 months) and toddlerhood/preschool (ages 25–64 months) to intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and victimization in adulthood (ages 23, 26, and 32 years) using 2 complementary approaches. Building on past findings, a variable-oriented approach was used to examine the effects of developmental timing of EIPV in infancy versus toddlerhood/preschool to IPV involvement in early adulthood, at age 23 years. A person-oriented approach next examined whether continuity and change in IPV (persisting, in...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Attitudes toward and prevalence of extramarital sex and descriptions of extramarital partners in the 21st century.
Using the most recent nine waves of data from the General Social Survey, which consists of in-person interviews of independent probability samples of the adult household population of the United States, the purposes of this study were to (a) provide descriptive information on adults’ attitudes toward extramarital sex, lifetime and annual prevalence of extramarital sex among ever-married adults, and the identity of the extramarital sex partner(s) of currently married adults; (b) evaluate temporal trends in attitudes toward and prevalence of extramarital sex from 2000 to 2016; and (c) test for gender differences in att...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Implications of parent–child relationships for emerging adults’ subjective feelings about adulthood.
Little is known about the role of parents in promoting their children’s successful transition to adulthood, particularly for college students who may maintain stronger ties to parents than other emerging adults. The present study therefore investigated longitudinal implications of parent–child relationship qualities during emerging adults’ first year of college for their feelings about the upcoming transition to adulthood 3 years later, as well as implications of 3 types of parental control (behavioral control, psychological control, helicopter parenting) for these associations. Multilevel models indicate...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family dinner frequency interacts with dinnertime context in associations with child and parent BMI outcomes.
For youth and parents, frequent family meals have been consistently associated with positive dietary outcomes but less consistently associated with lower body mass index (BMI). Researchers have speculated dinnertime context (dinnertime routines, parent dinnertime media use) may interact with family meal frequency to impact associations with BMI. The present study evaluates the associations and interactions between dinnertime context measures and family dinner frequency with parent and child BMI. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from the Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus randomized...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Longitudinal associations between adult children’s relations with parents and intimate partners.
Drawing on 5 waves of multiple-informant data gathered from focal participants and their parents and intimate partners (n = 360 families) who completed annual surveys in the German Family Panel (pairfam) study, the present investigation examined bidirectional associations between the development of adults’ conflictual and intimate interactions with their parents and intimate partners. Autoregressive cross-lagged latent change score modeling results revealed a robust pattern of coordinated development between parent-adult child and couple conflictual and intimate interactions: increases in conflict and intimacy in one...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Prayer and forgiveness: Beyond relationship quality and extension to marriage.
The majority of the world population profess religious/spiritual beliefs and prayer is a form of spiritual activity common across numerous religious/spiritual belief systems. Three studies therefore examined the role of prayer in romantic relationships. Study 1 (n = 91) showed that prayer for a dating partner predicted lower aggressive tendencies and greater forgiveness of partner transgressions, independently of relationship closeness. Study 2 (n = 89 married couples) is among the first to examine the prayer–forgiveness association using dyadic data. Controlling for relationship satisfaction in the actor–partn...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Long-term effects of a parenting preventive intervention on young adults’ painful feelings about divorce.
This study examined whether the New Beginnings Program (NBP), a parenting preventive intervention for divorced mothers that was designed to reduce children’s postdivorce mental health problems, reduced painful feelings about divorce in young adults whose families had participated 15 years earlier. This study also explored whether NBP participation reduced the relations between young adults’ painful feelings about divorce and their concurrent internalizing, externalizing, and substance use problems. Participants (M = 25.6 years; 50% female; 88% Caucasian) were from 240 families that had been recruited into a ran...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Mothers’ and fathers’ internalizing symptoms influence parental ratings of adolescent anxiety symptoms.
Clinical assessment of anxiety in adolescents often involves multiple informants, and parental internalizing symptoms have been found to influence parent ratings of adolescents’ anxiety symptoms. We investigated how parental internalizing symptoms (anxiety and depression) were related to adolescent and parent reports of adolescents’ anxiety symptoms in a population-based cross-sectional survey. The sample comprised 337 adolescent–mother–father triads (N = 1,011) drawn from the Tracking Opportunities and Problems in Childhood and Adolescence (TOPP) study. Adolescents (43.9% boys) were 14- and 15-year...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Communication moderates effects of residential mobility on relationship quality among ethnically diverse couples.
Although interpersonal communication is a defining feature of committed relationships, the quality of couple communication has not proven to be a straightforward cause of relationship quality. At the same time, emerging models argue that external circumstances likely combine with communication to generate changes in relationship quality. We integrate these 2 ideas by proposing that communication does exert effects on changes in relationship quality, but primarily when couples encounter challenging situations that require an adaptive response. In the present study we examine residential moves to different neighborhoods as o...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Are there individual and sibling differences in appraisals of interparental conflict?
Despite decades of empirical literature documenting the harmful effects of frequent, intense, violent, and unresolved interparental conflict on children’s adjustment, there is considerable variability in the extent to which marital conflict contributes to the development of children’s emotional and behavioral problems. Past research has documented links between properties of interparental conflict itself (e.g., intensity, frequency), children’s appraisals of conflict, and children’s outcomes, yet less is known about the role of individual and family characteristics in predicting children’s con...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Empathic accuracy and relationship satisfaction: A meta-analytic review.
Empathic accuracy (EA; Ickes & Hodges, 2013) is the extent to which people accurately perceive their peers’ thoughts, feelings, and other inner mental states. EA has particularly interested researchers in the context of romantic couples. Reviews of the literature suggest a possible link between romantic partners’ EA and their relationship satisfaction (Ickes & Simpson, 2001; Sillars & Scott, 1983). To assess the magnitude of this association and examine possible moderators, we performed a meta-analytic review of 21 studies (total N = 2,739 participants) that examined the association between EA and s...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Sexual orientation and future parenthood in a 2011–2013 nationally representative United States sample.
Previous researchers have found evidence for differences in parenting goals between lesbian and gay people and their heterosexual peers. However, no previous research has quantified the parenting goals of bisexual people or evaluated parenting goals as a function of sexual partner gender. In addition, political and social climates for sexual minority people had improved rapidly since the last representative data on lesbian and gay peoples’ plans for parenthood were collected. We analyzed data from 3,941 childless lesbian, gay, bisexual, and heterosexual participants from the 2011–2013 National Survey of Family ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

His, hers, or theirs? Coparenting after the birth of a second child.
This study examined changes in coparenting after the birth of a second child. Mothers and fathers from 241 2-parent families reported on their spouses’ coparenting cooperation and conflict with their firstborn children before (prenatal) and 4 months after the birth of a second child. Parents completed prenatal questionnaires on their gender-role attitudes, marital satisfaction, and firstborn children’s temperamental characteristics. Parents also reported on their second-born infants’ temperaments at 1 month of age. Coparenting conflict increased across the transition, and cooperation decreased. Couples in...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Daily interactions with aging parents and adult children: Associations with negative affect and diurnal cortisol.
Midlife adults report greater investment in their children than in their parents, and these ties have important implications for well-being. To date, little research has addressed daily experiences in these ties. The present study examines daily experiences (negative and positive) with aging parents and adult children and their associations with daily negative affect and diurnal cortisol rhythms. Participants were middle-aged adults (N = 156; 56% women) from Wave 2 of the Family Exchanges Study, conducted in 2013, who completed a 7-day daily diary study, which included assessments of daily negative and positive social enco...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Profiling families in conflict: Multigenerational continuity in conflict predicts deleterious adolescent and adult outcomes.
The present study investigated the associations between multigenerational continuity in family conflict and current psychopathology symptoms and social impairment experienced by parents and adolescents. We sampled 246 families from a multigenerational, high-risk, longitudinal study of parents (G1s) and their children (G2s), followed from adolescence (Mage = 14.3 years, 57% female, 71% Caucasian, 26% Hispanic or Latino) to adulthood as well as the children of G2 targets (G3s; Mage = 12.1 years, 47% female, 51% Caucasian, 33% Hispanic or Latino). Family conflict was measured by composite latent variables incorporating mother...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family psychology: Past and future reflections on the field.
Prominent issues in the field of family psychology during my term as editor (1998 –2003) of this journal were briefly noted, including a focus on marital issues, divorce, remarriage and family conflict. Parenting, attachment and parent-child relationships were also significant topics in this period. Special sections of the journal focused on cultural variations, families and th e law, families and religion, and family routines and rituals. Several neglected issues that need more attention in the future were noted. These include the need to recognize the embeddedness of families in socioecological contexts, the import...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Parke, Ross D. Source Type: research

Standing on shaky ground? Dyadic and longitudinal associations between posttraumatic stress and relationship quality postearthquake.
In the current study, we took a unique dyadic approach to examine how people’s relationship quality following an earthquake was associated with their and their partner’s posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and whether support exchanges in the relationship protected relationship quality in the face of this adversity. Ninety-nine heterosexual couples were studied over 4 time points for approximately 15 months following the Canterbury, New Zealand, earthquakes. The data were analyzed using moderated growth-curve modeling in an Actor–Partner Interdependence Model framework. In line with predictions, both par...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Harsh parenting, child behavior problems, and the dynamic coupling of parents’ and children’s positive behaviors.
We examined self-reported maternal and paternal harsh parenting (HP) and its effect on the moment-to-moment dynamic coupling of maternal autonomy support and children’s positive, autonomous behavior. This positive behavior coupling was measured via hidden Markov models as the likelihood of transitions into specific positive dyadic states in real time. We also examined whether positive behavior coupling, in turn, predicted later HP and child behavior problems. Children (N = 96; age = 3.5 years at Time 1) and mothers completed structured clean-up and puzzle tasks in the laboratory. Mothers’ and fathers’ HP ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Familial risk and sibling mentalization: Links with preschoolers’ internalizing problems.
The current study explored whether older sibling mentalization moderated the relationship between familial risk for internalizing symptoms and the development of future internalizing problems in the younger siblings, referred to as target children. Data were collected on 397 older siblings at Time 1 (T1) when target children were newborn and their older siblings were on average 2.61 years old (SD = .75). Target children were on average 1.60 years old at Time 2 (T2). Internalizing problems were assessed via mother and partner reports. Familial risk was operationalized as the average of all older siblings’ level of int...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parenting stress mediates the association between negative affectivity and harsh parenting: A longitudinal dyadic analysis.
The current study examined parenting stress (disaggregated into personal distress and child rearing stress) at 12 months postpartum as a mediator of the longitudinal association between parental negative affectivity at 6 months postpartum and harsh parenting at 3 years postpartum for first-time parents with a child transitioning from late toddlerhood to the early preschool years. Analyses were conducted using Mediation for Actor Partner Interdependence Modeling in a sample of 164 couples who participated in a randomized controlled trial of a universal, couple-based transition to parenthood program. There were indirect acto...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parental social coaching promotes adolescent peer acceptance across the middle school transition.
The present study investigated longitudinal associations between behavioral and cognitive dimensions of parental social coaching (i.e., advice about how to behave or think about peer challenges) and young adolescents’ peer acceptance, and whether such associations are moderated by youths’ social skills. Time 1 (T1) participants included 123 young adolescents (M age = 12.03 years; 50% boys; 58.5% European American). Parents gave open-ended reports about their social coaching to hypothetical peer stress scenarios, which were coded from low to high quality on behavioral and cognitive dimensions. Parents and teache...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Findings from a couple-based open trial for adult anorexia nervosa.
We present results from an open trial of a couple-based intervention for adult anorexia nervosa as an adjunct treatment to standard multidisciplinary care. Twenty couples received treatment over approximately 26 weeks, including a couple-based intervention, individual CBT sessions, psychiatry visits for medication management, and nutritional counseling sessions. The results indicate that patients improved at posttest and 3-month follow-up on a variety of AN-related measures, anxiety and depression, and relationship adjustment. Partners also improved on anxiety, depression, and relationship adjustment. In an exploratory ana...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Marital well-being and depression in Chinese marriage: Going beyond satisfaction and ruling out critical confounders.
Based on data obtained from 203 Chinese couples during the early years of marriage and utilizing the actor–partner interdependence model, this study examined the prospective associations between different aspects of marital well-being (i.e., marital satisfaction, instability, commitment, and closeness) and depressive symptoms (assessed 2 years later) while controlling for critical intrapersonal (i.e., neuroticism and self-esteem) and contextual (i.e., stressful life events) confounders. Results indicated that (a) when considering different aspects of marital well-being as predictors of depressive symptoms separately,...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family hostility and depressive symptoms in middle-aged couples: Moderating effect of marital integration.
This study examined (a) the associations between family hostility (husband–wife marital hostility and child hostility) and middle-aged husbands’ and wives’ depressive symptoms over an 11-year time period and (b) the moderating influence of couples’ marital integration on these associations as measured by their joint activity. Higher order family-level latent constructs captured chronic husband–wife (marital) hostility using husbands’ and wives’ reports of chronic hostile interactions from 1990 to 1992, while a higher order latent construct of chronic child hostility toward parents ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Unique contributions of dynamic versus global measures of parent–child interaction quality in predicting school adjustment.
This study investigates the unique contribution of microsocial and global measures of parent–child positive coregulation (PCR) in predicting children’s behavioral and social adjustment in school. Using a community sample of 102 children, ages 4–6, and their parents, we conducted nested path analytic models to identify the unique effects of 2 measures of PCR on school outcomes. Microsocial PCR independently predicted fewer externalizing and inattention/impulsive behaviors in school. Global PCR did not uniquely relate to children’s behavioral and social adjustment outcomes. Household socioeconomic sta...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family Assessment Device: Real-world validity in urban families of children with asthma.
Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) was used to further validate the real-world predictability of the Family Assessment Device (FAD) among low income, racial and ethnic minority, urban families of children (7–12 years) with asthma. Caregivers completed self-report measures at baseline, as well as daily assessments of family functioning for 2 weeks through EMA delivered via smartphone. Concurrent validity was established with measures of caregiver perceived stress and positive and negative affect at baseline. Better family functioning at baseline was associated with EMA reports of families getting along better and o...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parental involvement as an etiological moderator of middle childhood oppositional defiant disorder.
The goal of this study was to investigate parental involvement as an etiologic moderator of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) during middle childhood. Previous studies examining the influence of genetic and environmental factors on ODD have not considered whether and how these factors might vary by parental involvement. We thus conducted a series of “latent genetic by measured environmental” interaction analyses, in which measured parental involvement was allowed to moderate genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental influences on child ODD. Participants include 1,027 twin pairs (age ranged from 6 to 11 yea...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Bidirectional effects of parenting and child behavior in internationally adopting families.
Adoption marks a radical transition in caregiving for thousands of children adopted internationally from institutional care; however, very little is known about the quality of this parenting compared with other populations or the transactional effects of parent and child characteristics in postadoption families during the transition to family care. The current study examined parental sensitivity/responsiveness and structure/limit-setting in a group of 68 children adopted internationally from institutions (41 girls, 27 boys; M age = 26.13 months, SD = 4.99) and their parents over the first year after adoption and compared t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Graphic methods for interpreting longitudinal dyadic patterns from repeated-measures actor–partner interdependence models.
Researchers commonly use repeated-measures actor–partner interdependence models (RM-APIM) to understand how romantic partners change in relation to one another over time. However, traditional interpretations of the results of these models do not fully or correctly capture the dyadic temporal patterns estimated in RM-APIM. Interpretation of results from these models largely focuses on the meaning of single-parameter estimates in isolation from all the others. However, considering individual coefficients separately impedes the understanding of how these associations combine to produce an interdependent pattern that eme...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Multivariate analysis of genetic and environmental influences on parenting in adolescence.
Adolescents whose parents are affectionate, maintain consistent rules, and are knowledgeable about their whereabouts tend to exhibit more adaptive levels of psychological functioning across multiple domains. Behavioral genetic research has documented the sensitivity of parenting to genetically influenced child characteristics and behaviors. Yet, the question of whether the correlations between parenting behaviors are driven by overlapping parent effects, overlapping child effects, or some combination of the two remains open. In a sample of N = 542 twins, ages 13.6 to 20.1 years, from the Texas Twin Project, we evaluated th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research