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Profiling families in conflict: Multigenerational continuity in conflict predicts deleterious adolescent and adult outcomes.
The present study investigated the associations between multigenerational continuity in family conflict and current psychopathology symptoms and social impairment experienced by parents and adolescents. We sampled 246 families from a multigenerational, high-risk, longitudinal study of parents (G1s) and their children (G2s), followed from adolescence (Mage = 14.3 years, 57% female, 71% Caucasian, 26% Hispanic or Latino) to adulthood as well as the children of G2 targets (G3s; Mage = 12.1 years, 47% female, 51% Caucasian, 33% Hispanic or Latino). Family conflict was measured by composite latent variables incorporating mother...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family psychology: Past and future reflections on the field.
Prominent issues in the field of family psychology during my term as editor (1998 –2003) of this journal were briefly noted, including a focus on marital issues, divorce, remarriage and family conflict. Parenting, attachment and parent-child relationships were also significant topics in this period. Special sections of the journal focused on cultural variations, families and th e law, families and religion, and family routines and rituals. Several neglected issues that need more attention in the future were noted. These include the need to recognize the embeddedness of families in socioecological contexts, the import...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Parke, Ross D. Source Type: research

Findings from a couple-based open trial for adult anorexia nervosa.
We present results from an open trial of a couple-based intervention for adult anorexia nervosa as an adjunct treatment to standard multidisciplinary care. Twenty couples received treatment over approximately 26 weeks, including a couple-based intervention, individual CBT sessions, psychiatry visits for medication management, and nutritional counseling sessions. The results indicate that patients improved at posttest and 3-month follow-up on a variety of AN-related measures, anxiety and depression, and relationship adjustment. Partners also improved on anxiety, depression, and relationship adjustment. In an exploratory ana...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family Assessment Device: Real-world validity in urban families of children with asthma.
Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) was used to further validate the real-world predictability of the Family Assessment Device (FAD) among low income, racial and ethnic minority, urban families of children (7–12 years) with asthma. Caregivers completed self-report measures at baseline, as well as daily assessments of family functioning for 2 weeks through EMA delivered via smartphone. Concurrent validity was established with measures of caregiver perceived stress and positive and negative affect at baseline. Better family functioning at baseline was associated with EMA reports of families getting along better and o...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Bidirectional effects of parenting and child behavior in internationally adopting families.
Adoption marks a radical transition in caregiving for thousands of children adopted internationally from institutional care; however, very little is known about the quality of this parenting compared with other populations or the transactional effects of parent and child characteristics in postadoption families during the transition to family care. The current study examined parental sensitivity/responsiveness and structure/limit-setting in a group of 68 children adopted internationally from institutions (41 girls, 27 boys; M age = 26.13 months, SD = 4.99) and their parents over the first year after adoption and compared t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Graphic methods for interpreting longitudinal dyadic patterns from repeated-measures actor–partner interdependence models.
Researchers commonly use repeated-measures actor–partner interdependence models (RM-APIM) to understand how romantic partners change in relation to one another over time. However, traditional interpretations of the results of these models do not fully or correctly capture the dyadic temporal patterns estimated in RM-APIM. Interpretation of results from these models largely focuses on the meaning of single-parameter estimates in isolation from all the others. However, considering individual coefficients separately impedes the understanding of how these associations combine to produce an interdependent pattern that eme...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Multivariate analysis of genetic and environmental influences on parenting in adolescence.
Adolescents whose parents are affectionate, maintain consistent rules, and are knowledgeable about their whereabouts tend to exhibit more adaptive levels of psychological functioning across multiple domains. Behavioral genetic research has documented the sensitivity of parenting to genetically influenced child characteristics and behaviors. Yet, the question of whether the correlations between parenting behaviors are driven by overlapping parent effects, overlapping child effects, or some combination of the two remains open. In a sample of N = 542 twins, ages 13.6 to 20.1 years, from the Texas Twin Project, we evaluated th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Partner social constraints and early-stage breast cancer: Longitudinal associations with psychosexual adjustment.
This study examined whether perceived partner social constraints were associated with psychosexual adjustment over time in 108 BC survivors. Early-stage BC patients completed measures of partner social constraints, psychosexual adjustment, and relationship dissatisfaction approximately 1 month, 8 months, and 4 years after initial surgery. Latent growth curve modeling revealed partner social constraints to be a significant time-varying, within-person predictor of psychosexual adjustment at each time point after controlling for relationship dissatisfaction. BC surgery type, reconstructive surgery, cancer stage, chemotherapy,...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Military children’s difficulty with reintegration after deployment: A relational turbulence model perspective.
This study drew on the relational turbulence model to investigate how the interpersonal dynamics of military couples predict parents’ reports of the reintegration difficulty of military children upon homecoming after deployment. Longitudinal data were collected from 118 military couples once per month for 3 consecutive months after reunion. Military couples reported on their depressive symptoms, characteristics of their romantic relationship, and the reintegration difficulty of their oldest child. Results of dyadic growth curve models indicated that the mean levels of parents’ depressive symptoms (H1), relation...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Supportive and intrusive parenting during early childhood: Relations with children’s fear temperament and sex.
The current study examined the extent to which child sex and fear reactivity were linked to mothers’ observed use of supportive and intrusive parenting behaviors. Two dimensions of observed fear reactivity were considered: distress (i.e., fearfulness) and approach (i.e., fearlessness). The sample consisted of 160 predominantly African American, low-income families that included mothers, 1 sibling approximately 2 years old, and the closest age older sibling who was approximately 4 years old. Results from fixed-effects within-family models indicated that above and beyond the main effect of child engagement on observed ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Does marital conflict predict infants’ physiological regulation? A short-term prospective study.
This study extends earlier work by examining linkages between marital functioning (conflict and harmony) and infants’ cardiac vagal tone and developmental status across 2 time points using a cross-lag approach. Differential findings were found for boys and girls, with concurrent linkages between marital love and vagal tone at 6 months for boys and girls but only for boys at 12 months. In addition, marital conflict at 6 months predicted lower cardiac vagal tone in girls at 12 months but not boys. Finally, infants’ developmental status at 6 months was found to predict marital conflict at 12 months. Higher scores ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Does marital conflict predict infants ’ physiological regulation? A short-term prospective study.
This study extends earlier work by examining linkages between marital functioning (conflict and harmony) and infants ’ cardiac vagal tone and developmental status across 2 time points using a cross-lag approach. Differential findings were found for boys and girls, with concurrent linkages between marital love and vagal tone at 6 months for boys and girls but only for boys at 12 months. In addition, marital confl ict at 6 months predicted lower cardiac vagal tone in girls at 12 months but not boys. Finally, infants’ developmental status at 6 months was found to predict marital conflict at 12 months. Higher score...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Porter, Christin L.; Dyer, W. Justin Source Type: research

Finding time over time: Longitudinal links between employed mothers’ work–family conflict and time profiles.
Drawing upon the Work–Home Resources model (ten Brummelhuis & Bakker, 2012), this study examined the links between work–family conflict and employed mothers’ profiles of time resources for work and parenting roles. Using a person-centered latent profile approach, we identified 3 profiles of time use and perceived time adequacy in a sample of mothers employed in the extended-care industry (N = 440): a Work-Oriented profile, characterized by spending relatively more time at work, perceiving lower time adequacy for work, spending less time with children, and perceiving lower time adequacy for children; a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Mother–adolescent conflict types and adolescent adjustment: A person-oriented analysis.
This investigation was designed to identify dyadic differences in mother–adolescent conflict. In 2 studies (N = 131 and N = 147), adolescents (M = 13.88 and 14.65 years old) described the number of disagreements with mothers during the previous (1 or 3) days, their affective intensity, and perceptions of negativity in the relationship. Cluster analyses yielded 3 unique groups that replicated across studies: (a) placid dyads (50% of Study 1 participants and 36% of Study 2 participants), notable for low disagreement affective intensity and low relationship negativity; (b) explosive dyads (25% of Study 1 participants an...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Mother –adolescent conflict types and adolescent adjustment: A person-oriented analysis.
This investigation was designed to identify dyadic differences in mother –adolescent conflict. In 2 studies (N = 131 and N = 147), adolescents (M = 13.88 and 14.65 years old) described the number of disagreements with mothers during the previous (1 or 3) days, their affective intensity, and perceptions of negativity in the relationship. Cluster analyses yielded 3 uniqu e groups that replicated across studies: (a) placid dyads (50% of Study 1 participants and 36% of Study 2 participants), notable for low disagreement affective intensity and low relationship negativity; (b) explosive dyads (25% of Study 1 participants ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Huey, Melissa; Hiatt, Cody; Laursen, Brett; Burk, William J.; Rubin, Kenneth Source Type: research

Analyzing dyadic data with multilevel modeling versus structural equation modeling: A tale of two methods.
Multilevel modeling (MLM) and structural equation modeling (SEM) are the dominant methods for the analysis of dyadic data. Both methods are extensively reviewed for the widely used actor–partner interdependence model and the dyadic growth curve model, as well as other less frequently adopted models, including the common fate model and the mutual influence model. For each method, we discuss the analysis of distinguishable and indistinguishable members, the treatment of missing data, the standardization of effects, and tests of mediation. Even though there has been some blending of the 2 methods, each method has its ow...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Analyzing dyadic data with multilevel modeling versus structural equation modeling: A tale of two methods.
Multilevel modeling (MLM) and structural equation modeling (SEM) are the dominant methods for the analysis of dyadic data. Both methods are extensively reviewed for the widely used actor –partner interdependence model and the dyadic growth curve model, as well as other less frequently adopted models, including the common fate model and the mutual influence model. For each method, we discuss the analysis of distinguishable and indistinguishable members, the treatment of missing dat a, the standardization of effects, and tests of mediation. Even though there has been some blending of the 2 methods, each method has its ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ledermann, Thomas; Kenny, David A. Source Type: research

Parenting in poverty: Attention bias and anxiety interact to predict parents ’ perceptions of daily parenting hassles.
This study extends a growing literature on neurocognitive models of parenting by exploring the extent to which attention processes in parents operate independently and interactively with intrapsychic processes, proximal interpersonal stressors, and the larger socioeconomic context to predict perc eptions of parenting hassles in primarily low-income Latino/a parents of young children living in urban areas of concentrated disadvantage (N = 185). Analyses indicated that parent reports of anxiety, intimate partner violence, and perceptions of financial hardship each uniquely predicted parents’ perceptions of daily parent...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Finegood, Eric D.; Raver, C. Cybele; DeJoseph, Meriah L.; Blair, Clancy Source Type: research

Maternal executive function, heart rate, and EEG alpha reactivity interact in the prediction of harsh parenting.
Do physiological and behavioral performance indicators of effortful cognitive self-regulation converge additively or interactively in their statistical prediction of individual differences in harsh parenting? To answer this question, we examined heart rate (HR) and electroencephalography alpha ( α) reactivity during executive function (EF) tasks, along with observed and self-reported indicators of harsh parenting. A socioeconomically diverse sample of 115 mothers with 3- to 7-year-old children completed questionnaires and a laboratory visit. Three quarters of the mothers showed typical pat terns of task reactivity th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Bell, Martha Ann Source Type: research

Introduction to the special section: Mind and matter: New insights on the role of parental cognitive and neurobiological functioning in process models of parenting.
This is an introduction to the special section on neurobiological and neurocognitive factors in parenting. The collection of 11 papers are published in 2 serial subsections of consecutive issues of the journal. The science they present captures the leading edge of work examining the interface of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physiological self-regulation in parenting and how these operate to protect or increment risk for poorer parenting among families who face chronic stressors (e.g., poverty, single parenthood, homelessness, mood disorders). Samples span the poor to the affluent, many ethnicities, several nationa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L. Source Type: research

Family psychology and the psychology of men and masculinities.
This article was invited to mark the 30th anniversary of the Journal of Family Psychology, which is also the 125th anniversary of APA publications. I served as the second Editor of the journal, from 1992 to 1997. I reflect on some of the similarities and differences between the journal ’s mission statements from 1992 and 2016, and then discuss my intellectual evolution from family psychologist to psychologist of men and masculinities, pointing out opportunities for collaboration. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Levant, Ronald F. Source Type: research

Introduction to three decades of family psychology: Perspectives toward the future.
This article introduces the 30th anniversary of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP). In addition it marks the 125th anniversary of publications by the American Psychological Association. In recognition of this milestone the editorial team has invited the past editors of the journal to write brief reflections on the field and commenting on their vision for the future of the field. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fiese, Barbara H. Source Type: research

Members ’ attendance rates and outcomes of relationship education groups: A consensus-dispersion analysis.
Relationship education programs (REPs) are an effective way to enhance relationship communication, prevent relational distress, and increase relationship quality. Most REPs are delivered in a group format; however, there is little known about the influence of group processes on outcomes for these programs, such as group members ’ attendance. Therefore, the current study applied a dispersion-consensus model to test the impact of attendance at the member and group levels on group members’ REP outcomes. In a sample of 558 lower income, primarily African American participants, we examined whether individual and gro...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kivlighan III, D. Martin; Owen, Jesse; Antle, Becky Source Type: research

Better late than early: Marital timing and subjective well-being in midlife.
Drawing on data from 405 Canadian adults surveyed as high school seniors (Age 18) and again in midlife (Age 43), the present study examined whether marital timing, a variable rooted in the age norm hypothesis (whether marriage was early, on time, or late in relation to peers), might contribute additional insight into the well-documented association between marital status and subjective well-being (SWB; happiness, symptoms of depression, and self-esteem). The analysis also considered 3 alternative explanations of the marriage–SWB link: the social selection hypothesis, social role theory, and the adaptation perspective...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Interparental conflict and infants’ behavior problems: The mediating role of maternal sensitivity.
This study examined the associations between mother-reported interparental conflict and young children’s behavior problems over the first 2 years of their lives in a sample of 212 mothers and infants. Two aspects of maternal sensitivity, sensitivity during distressing and nondistressing contexts, were examined as possible mediators between interparental conflict and infants’ behavior problems. Results indicated that interparental conflict was associated directly with infants’ externalizing problems over time but was associated indirectly with infants’ internalizing problems over time via compromised...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Interparental conflict and infants ’ behavior problems: The mediating role of maternal sensitivity.
This study examined the associations between mother-reported interparental conflict and young children ’s behavior problems over the first 2 years of their lives in a sample of 212 mothers and infants. Two aspects of maternal sensitivity, sensitivity during distressing and nondistressing contexts, were examined as possible mediators between interparental conflict and infants’ behavior problems. R esults indicated that interparental conflict was associated directly with infants’ externalizing problems over time but was associated indirectly with infants’ internalizing problems over time via compromis...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Zhou, Nan; Cao, Hongjian; Leerkes, Esther M. Source Type: research

The role of emotional capital during the early years of marriage: Why everyday moments matter.
Throughout a marriage couples will share countless ordinary moments together that may seem trivial, but which actually have potential to affirm and strengthen relational bonds. According to theories of emotional capital, the accumulation of shared positive moments in a relationship should serve as an essential resource for protecting the relationship against threats. To date, however, few empirical studies have explored the role emotional capital may play in shaping responses to negative relationship experiences. In the current study, newly married couples completed 3 14-day daily diary tasks assessing emotional capital, n...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Mother, father, and adolescent self-control and adherence in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes.
This study explored whether shared self-control across a family system, including adolescent, mother, and father self-control, as well as the interaction of mother and father self-control, was associated with ease of completing adherence tasks and the completion of adherence behaviors related to the Type 1 diabetes (T1D) regimen. One hundred thirty-seven adolescents (M = 13.48 years), mothers, and fathers completed a self-report measure of self-control, while adolescents also self-reported on ease of completing adherence tasks and the frequency with which they completed adherence tasks. Higher adolescent, mother, father, a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The role of emotional capital during the early years of marriage: Why everyday moments matter.
Throughout a marriage couples will share countless ordinary moments together that may seem trivial, but which actually have potential to affirm and strengthen relational bonds. According to theories of emotional capital, the accumulation of shared positive moments in a relationship should serve as an essential resource for protecting the relationship against threats. To date, however, few empirical studies have explored the role emotional capital may play in shaping responses to negative relationship experiences. In the current study, newly married couples completed 3 14-day daily diary tasks assessing emotional capital, n...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Walsh, Courtney M.; Neff, Lisa A.; Gleason, Marci E. J. Source Type: research

Mother, father, and adolescent self-control and adherence in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes.
This study explored whether shared self-control across a family system, including adolescent, mother, and father self-control, as well as the interaction of mother and father self-control, was associated with ease of completing adherence tasks and the completion of adherence behaviors related to the Type 1 diabetes (T1D) regimen. One hundred thirty-seven adolescents (M = 13.48 years), mothers, and fathers completed a self-report measure of self-control, while adolescents also self-reported on ease of completing adherence tasks and the frequency with which they completed adherence tasks. Higher adolescent, mother, father, a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lansing, Amy Hughes; Crochiere, Rebecca; Cueto, Carrie; Wiebe, Deborah J.; Berg, Cynthia A. Source Type: research

The heart of parenting: Parent HR dynamics and negative parenting while resolving conflict with child.
The current study examined parent heart rate (HR) dynamic changing patterns and their links to observed negative parenting (i.e., emotional unavailability and psychological control) during a parent –child conflict resolution task among 150 parent–child dyads (child age ranged from 6 to 12 years, Mage = 8.54 ± 1.67). Parent HR was obtained from electrocardiogram (ECG) data collected during the parent–child conflict resolution task. Negative parenting was coded offline based on the video recording of the same task. Results revealed that emotionally sensitive parents during the task showed greater HR ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Zhang, Xutong; Cui, Lixian; Han, Zhuo Rachel; Yan, Jia Source Type: research

Not a “mom thing”: Predictors of gatekeeping in same-sex and heterosexual parent families.
The current study is the first to examine parental gatekeeping in both same-sex (57 female, 51 male) and heterosexual (n = 82) couples, all of whom became parents via adoption. Aspects of the individual, the couple, and the work context, measured preadoption, were examined as predictors of gatekeeping. Gatekeeping refers to attitudes and behaviors aimed at regulating and limiting the involvement of the other parent in housework and child care and was measured 2 years postadoption. Findings revealed that women in heterosexual relationships reported higher gatekeeping compared with all other groups, and men in same-sex relat...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Maternal scaffolding in a disadvantaged global context: The influence of working memory and cognitive capacities.
The current study focuses on maternal cognitive capacities as determinants of parenting in a highly disadvantaged global context, where children ’s experiences at home are often the 1st and only opportunity for learning and intellectual growth. In a large sample of 1,291 biological mothers of preschool-aged children in rural Pakistan, we examined the unique association of maternal working memory skills (independent of related cognitive cap acities) with cognitively stimulating parenting behaviors. Path analysis revealed that directly assessed working memory, short-term memory, and verbal intelligence independently pr...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Obradovi ć, Jelena; Portilla, Ximena A.; Tirado-Strayer, Nicole; Siyal, Saima; Rasheed, Muneera A.; Yousafzai, Aisha K. Source Type: research

The risk for marital infidelity across a year-long deployment.
This study used a prospective design to examine the prevalence and risk factors of infidelity across the deployment cycle including a year-long deployment to Iraq. A total of 63 married male Airmen were assessed both pre- and 6–9 months postdeployment. The rate of sexual infidelity prior to deployment (21%) was commensurate with the lifetime rate of sexual involvement outside the marriage in representative community samples of men. Across the deployment period, the prevalence of sexual infidelity was strikingly high (22.6%) compared with annual community estimates (1.5–4%; Allen et al., 2005). Findings demonstr...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Cognitions about infant sleep: Interparental differences, trajectories across the first year, and coparenting quality.
This study examined mothers’ and fathers’ beliefs about responding to infant night wakings across the first year of life, changes in those beliefs, and how individual maternal and paternal beliefs and interparental discrepancy in beliefs about responding to infant night wakings related to parents’ perceptions of coparenting quality. Participants were 167 mothers and 155 fathers who reported on their own beliefs about responding to infant night wakings and perceptions of coparenting quality when infants were 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months old. As predicted, mothers endorsed stronger beliefs about responding mor...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Longitudinal associations between marital stress and externalizing behavior: Does parental sense of competence mediate processes?
Ecological theories emphasize associations between children and elements within their family system, such as the marital relationship. Within a developmental perspective, we longitudinally examined (a) dynamic associations between marital stress and children’s externalizing behavior, (b) mediation of these associations by parental sense of competence, and (c) the extent to which associations are similar for mothers and fathers. The sample consisted of 369 two-parent families (46.1% boys; Mage at Time 1 = 7.70 years; 368 mothers, 355 fathers). Marital stress related to having a child, children’s externalizing be...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Mother–son discrepant reporting on parenting practices: The contribution of temperament and depression.
Despite low to moderate convergent correlations, assessment of youth typically relies on multiple informants for information across a range of psychosocial domains including parenting practices. Although parent–youth informant discrepancies have been found to predict adverse youth outcomes, few studies have examined contributing factors to the explanation of informant disagreements on parenting practices. The current study represents the first investigation to concurrently examine the role of mother and son’s self-reported affective dimensions of temperament and depression as pathways to informant discrepancies...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Cognitions about infant sleep: Interparental differences, trajectories across the first year, and coparenting quality.
This study examined mothers ’ and fathers’ beliefs about responding to infant night wakings across the first year of life, changes in those beliefs, and how individual maternal and paternal beliefs and interparental discrepancy in beliefs about responding to infant night wakings related to parents’ perceptions of coparen ting quality. Participants were 167 mothers and 155 fathers who reported on their own beliefs about responding to infant night wakings and perceptions of coparenting quality when infants were 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months old. As predicted, mothers endorsed stronger beliefs about responding m...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Reader, Jonathan M.; Teti, Douglas M.; Cleveland, Michael J. Source Type: research

Longitudinal associations between marital stress and externalizing behavior: Does parental sense of competence mediate processes?
Ecological theories emphasize associations between children and elements within their family system, such as the marital relationship. Within a developmental perspective, we longitudinally examined (a) dynamic associations between marital stress and children ’s externalizing behavior, (b) mediation of these associations by parental sense of competence, and (c) the extent to which associations are similar for mothers and fathers. The sample consisted of 369 two-parent families (46.1% boys; Mage at Time 1 = 7.70 years; 368 mothers, 355 fathers). Marital stress related to having a child, children’s externalizing b...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: van Eldik, Willemijn M.; Prinzie, Peter; Dekovi ć, Maja; de Haan, Amaranta D. Source Type: research

Mother –son discrepant reporting on parenting practices: The contribution of temperament and depression.
Despite low to moderate convergent correlations, assessment of youth typically relies on multiple informants for information across a range of psychosocial domains including parenting practices. Although parent –youth informant discrepancies have been found to predict adverse youth outcomes, few studies have examined contributing factors to the explanation of informant disagreements on parenting practices. The current study represents the first investigation to concurrently examine the role of mother and son’s self-reported affective dimensions of temperament and depression as pathways to informant discrepancie...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Shishido, Yuri; Latzman, Robert D. Source Type: research

Developmental delay and emotion dysregulation: Predicting parent –child conflict across early to middle childhood.
Cumulative risk research has increased understanding of how multiple risk factors impact various socioemotional and interpersonal outcomes across the life span. However, little is known about risk factors for parent –child conflict early in development, where identifying predictors of change could be highly salient for intervention. Given their established association with parent–child conflict, child developmental delay (DD) and emotion dysregulation were examined as predictors of change in conflict across early to middle childhood (ages 3 to 7 years). Participants (n = 211) were part of a longitudinal study e...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marquis, Willa A.; Noro ña, Amanda N.; Baker, Bruce L. Source Type: research

Relational aggression and marital quality: A five-year longitudinal study.
Relational aggression occurs in many different contexts, including in romantic relationships. The current study examined associations between two subtypes of relational aggression (love withdrawal and social sabotage) and marital quality over a 5-year time period. Participants consisted of 311 married couples who completed a number of questionnaires on relational aggression and relationship quality once a year over a 5-year period. Results revealed that relational aggression was highly stable over time and that women used more relational aggression than men. Men ’s use of social sabotage and love withdrawal were bidi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Coyne, Sarah M.; Nelson, David A.; Carroll, Jason S.; Smith, Nathan J.; Yang, Chongming; Holmgren, Hailey G.; Johnson, Chad Source Type: research

Parental mentalizing as an indirect link between attachment anxiety and parenting satisfaction.
Attachment anxiety in parents is associated with lower quality parent –child relationships. An inhibited capacity to reflect on children’s mental states, referred to as prementalizing, may reduce the pleasure parents derive from their relationships. In the current study, we explored the associations among attachment anxiety, prementalizing, and parenting satisfact ion in two groups of participants randomly assigned either to reflect on a positive memory with their child (n = 150) or to reflect on a positive memory not involving their child (n = 150). Narratives were evaluated for positive content using two metr...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Burkhart, Margaret L.; Borelli, Jessica L.; Rasmussen, Hannah F.; Brody, Robin; Sbarra, David A. Source Type: research

Executive function and parenting in the context of homelessness.
There is mounting evidence that maternal executive function (EF) plays a critical role in parenting behavior. However, the majority of the research on this topic has been conducted in low-risk samples. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether individual differences in maternal EF are associated with parenting behavior in the high-risk, high adversity context of family homelessness. The study included 94 mothers and their children, ages 4 to 6 years, living in emergency homeless shelters. Mothers completed a battery of “hot” and “cool” EF tasks as well as a self-report questionnair...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Monn, Amy R.; Narayan, Angela J.; Kalstabakken, Amanda W.; Schubert, Erin C.; Masten, Ann S. Source Type: research

Couple relationship education: A randomized controlled trial of professional contact and self-directed tools.
The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to examine the efficacy of an evidence-based relationship distress prevention program, the Couples Coping Enhancement Training (CCET), in dual well-earning couples and to investigate whether effects vary by (a) hours of professional contact and (b) mode of delivery (face to face vs. self-learning DVD). N = 159 couples were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 intervention conditions: (1) standard CCET (15 hours face to face), (2) compact CCET (12 hr face to face), (3) short CCET (self-learning DVD + 8 hr face to face), or (4) wait-list control group. Relationship satisfaction and dyad...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Zemp, Martina; Merz, Corina A.; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W.; Halford, W. Kim; Schaer Gmelch, Marcel; Bodenmann, Guy Source Type: research

When stress gets into your head: Socioeconomic risk, executive functions, and maternal sensitivity across childrearing contexts.
This study used a longitudinal design, and utilized a socioeconomically diverse sample of 185 mothers and their 3.5-year-old toddlers. Multi-informants and methods were used to assess constructs. Findings revealed that maternal EF mediated associations between socioeconomic risk and parenting sensitivity with specific effects for working memory and baseline sensitivity and inhibitory control and change in sensitivity as childrearing demands increased. Results are interpreted within emerging conceptual frameworks regarding the role of parental neurocognitive functioning and caregiving. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Jones, Hannah R.; Suor, Jennifer H. Source Type: research

The psychophysiology of parenting: Individual differences in autonomic reactivity to positive and negative mood inductions and observed parental affect during dyadic interactions with children.
Parenting is a complex activity driven, in part, by parental emotional and physiological responses. However, work examining the physiological underpinnings of parenting behavior is still in its infancy, and very few studies have examined such processes beyond early childhood. The current study examines associations between Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) indices of parents ’ physiological reactivity to positive and negative mood states and observed parental affect during a series of discussion tasks with their adolescent child. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) was measured as an index of parasympathetic nervous syst...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Connell, Arin M.; Dawson, Glen C.; Danzo, Sarah; McKillop, Hannah N. Source Type: research

Environmental adversity and children ’s early trajectories of problem behavior: The role of harsh parental discipline.
In conclusion, harsh parental discipli ne predicted emotional and behavioral problems in high- and low-risk children and moderated the effects of family poverty and adversity on these problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Flouri, Eirini; Midouhas, Emily Source Type: research

Relations between mothers’ daily work, home, and relationship stress with characteristics of mother–child conflict interactions.
This study examined whether daily variations in levels of mothers’ work, home, and relationship stress were related to collaborative and oppositional qualities of mother–child conflict interactions across 1 week. Mothers reported on 1 specific conflict interaction with their 5- to 8-year-old child and their work, home, and relationship stress through online surveys each day for 7 consecutive days. Diary data from 142 mothers were analyzed in 6 multilevel models, each including within- and between-family levels of a stressor predicting collaborative or oppositional conflict qualities. Results suggested that fami...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Relations between mothers ’ daily work, home, and relationship stress with characteristics of mother–child conflict interactions.
This study examined whether daily variations in levels of mothers ’ work, home, and relationship stress were related to collaborative and oppositional qualities of mother–child conflict interactions across 1 week. Mothers reported on 1 specific conflict interaction with their 5- to 8-year-old child and their work, home, and relationship stress through online s urveys each day for 7 consecutive days. Diary data from 142 mothers were analyzed in 6 multilevel models, each including within- and between-family levels of a stressor predicting collaborative or oppositional conflict qualities. Results suggested that fa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nelson, Jackie A.; Boyer, Brittany P.; Villarreal, Deyaun L.; Smith, Olivia A. Source Type: research