“A well spent day brings happy sleep”: A dyadic study of capitalization support in military-connected couples.
Among couples, sleep is theorized to be a dyadic process, within which relationship quality exerts a large influence (Troxel, Robles, Hall, & Buysse, 2007). In turn, research has shown that capitalization, or positive-event disclosure, influences relationship quality. The benefits of capitalization, however, are contingent on the receipt of a supportive response, here referred to as capitalization support (Reis & Gable, 2003). Accordingly, the current study examined daily capitalization support, loneliness, and intimacy as predictors of sleep (i.e., quality, duration, difficulty falling asleep). Post-9/11 military ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Autonomy support in toddlerhood: Similarities and contrasts between mothers and fathers.
Infant exploration often hinges on parental autonomy support (i.e., parental behaviors that support children’s goals, interests, and choices), a construct that is widely applied in family studies of school-age children and adolescents but less studied in infants and toddlers. Notable gaps concern the equivalence, similarities, and contrasts between mothers’ and fathers’ autonomy support and the correlates of individual differences in autonomy support. To address these underresearched topics, we conducted parallel home-based structured play observations of 195 infants (Mage = 14.42 months, SD = .59) in dya...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Sleep moderates the association between routines and emotion regulation for toddlers in poverty.
Routines in the family are a potential source of resilience for at-risk children and support children’s emerging emotion regulation. Meanwhile, inadequate sleep has been linked with deficits in cognitive processes to attend to environmental stimuli and with poor emotion regulation for children. The detrimental effects of poor sleep are potentially worse in low-income children. The aim of the current study was to examine the moderating role of sleep in the association between family routines and emotion regulation in toddlers in poverty. We analyzed data of 130 toddlers (24–31 months; 58% boys) from low-income, ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Does support need to be seen? Daily invisible support promotes next day relationship well-being.
Direct and overt visible support promotes recipients’ relationship satisfaction but can also exacerbate negative mood. In contrast, subtle and indirect invisible support can bypass costs to mood, but it is unclear whether it undermines or boosts relationship satisfaction. Because invisible support is not perceived by recipients, its relational impact may be delayed across time. Thus, the current research used three dyadic daily diary studies (total N = 322 married couples) to explore, for the first time, both the immediate (same day) and lagged (next day) effects of visible and invisible support on recipients’ ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family support: A possible buffer against disruptive events for individuals with and without remitted depression.
The current study sought to test the role of family support as a buffer of life stress for depressive symptoms in a sample of young adults at low- and high-risk for depression based on a previous history of depression. Ninety-seven young adults, 54 with remitted depression and 43 without prior history of depression, completed reports of family relationships, disruptive life events, and depressive symptoms at baseline and every 2 months for 10 months. Results revealed significant interactions between family environment and life events predicting Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI) scores at baseline, such that individuals with ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A randomized clinical trial of interventions for improving well-being in custodial grandfamilies.
Despite the rising cultural phenomenon of grandparents parenting grandchildren on a full-time basis due to problems within the birth parent generation, intervention studies with these families have been scarce, methodologically flawed, and without conceptual underpinnings. We conducted a randomized clinical trial (RCT) with 343 custodial grandmothers recruited from across 4 states to compare the effectiveness of behavioral parent training (BPT), cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT), and information-only control (IOC) conditions at lowering grandmothers’ psychological distress, improving their parenting practices,...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Childhood family adversity and adult cortisol response: The role of observed marital conflict behavior.
Childhood family adversity predicts adult interpersonal behavior and physiological responses to interpersonal stress. Additionally, negative marital behaviors (e.g., hostility and distress maintaining attributions) predict maladaptive stress responses and mental health problems, whereas positive marital behaviors (e.g., acceptance and relationship enhancing attributions) predict adaptive physiological and psychological outcomes. The present study examined potential marital behavior mediators and moderators of the link between childhood adversity and cortisol responses to conflict. In a sample of 218 different-sex newlywed ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Attributions and perceptions of criticism: An examination of patients with anxiety and normal control participants.
We examined relationships among attributions of criticism, perceived criticism, and upset due to criticism among individuals with anxiety disorders (n = 53) and with no psychopathology (n = 52). Participants completed measures of global attributions, perceived criticism, and upset due to criticism regarding criticism from a romantic partner/spouse or parent. After a 10-min problem-solving interaction with their relative, they completed measures of attributions, perceived criticism, and upset with regard to this relative’s critical behavior during the interaction, and observers reliably coded interactions for relative...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Direct, indirect, and buffering effects of support for mothers on children’s socioemotional adjustment.
Support for mothers may improve children’s socioemotional adjustment, yet few studies have considered the benefits of formal support (from health and social work professionals) in addition to social support (from family and friends) or explored the mechanisms. These issues were addressed using a birth cohort (n = 2,649) to explore how mothers’ perceptions of social and formal support when children were ages 10–22 months predicted trajectories of children’s externalizing and internalizing problems from 58 to 122 months. We tested mediating pathways from support to child adjustment via 3 family stress...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Discrepancies between parent and self-reports of adolescent psychosocial symptoms: Associations with family conflict and asthma outcomes.
This study examined patterns of multirater reporting discrepancies in a pediatric asthma population. Adolescents (n = 707; 11–17 years old) and their primary caregivers completed ratings of adolescents’ psychological symptoms. Latent profile analysis identified five profiles of parent–adolescent discrepancies, including one group with highly discordant ratings, two groups in agreement, and two groups with slightly discordant ratings. Adolescents who agreed with their parents on the presence of elevated symptoms and those who had significant discrepancies in ratings, such that parents reported elevated sym...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Economic pressure and depressive symptoms: Testing the family stress model from adolescence to adulthood.
The family stress model (FSM) was used to examine the effects of economic pressure on maternal depressive symptoms, couple conflict, and mother harsh parenting during adolescence on offspring depressive symptoms in adulthood. Prospective longitudinal data were analyzed across 3 developmental time points that included 451 mothers and their adolescents. Economic pressure and mother depressive symptoms were assessed during early adolescence, couple conflict and mother harsh parenting were assessed during middle to late adolescence, and offspring depressive symptoms were assessed in adulthood. Findings were in support of pathw...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Romantic outcomes in young adulthood: The role of dependency, parental support, and reflective functioning.
In recent years, an increasing number of young adults have difficulties making a smooth transition to adulthood in becoming romantically committed and balancing romantic commitments and other aspects of life. The present study was conducted on a sample of 100 Israeli emerging adults (54 males) who were followed from age 23 to 34 years. The study examined the role of personality attributes (dependency, self-criticism), parental support, and reflectivity concerning own family of origin in making a smoother transition to mature romantic engagement. Greater achievement of romantic goals and greater mastery in balancing family ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Expressed emotion, burden, and distress in significant others of people with dementia.
Significant others of people with dementia suffer high levels of burden and distress, creating the conditions for the negative attitudes and unhelpful responses described within the construct of Expressed Emotion (EE). It is not known however, whether EE then further enhances significant other burden and distress, and whether these processes operate early after symptoms of dementia have started. The current study used a longitudinal design to examine the potential influence of EE on burden and distress in significant others of people with a recent diagnosis of dementia. Sixty-one significant others of people with dementia ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Marriage improves neuroticism in Chinese newlyweds: Communication and marital affect as mediators.
We examined the mediating roles of communication and marital affect in the association between marital quality and neuroticism. Guided by the social investment theory and the personality-relationship transactions model, we tested the actor-partner interdependence mediation model to examine the associations among the variables. Participants were 268 Chinese newlywed couples who were a maximum of 3 years into their first marriage. The path model indicated that, first, both spouses’ marital quality at Time 1 was related with their own neuroticism at Time 3 after controlling for confounding variables. However, after cont...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Predicting coparenting quality in daily life in mothers and fathers.
The purpose of the current study was to examine contextual (daily relationship quality, daily stressors, daily work hours), parent (daily negative emotions, gender), and child factors (daily child-induced parenting stress) as predictors of mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions of daily coparenting quality. Mothers and fathers from 174 families completed a 14-day diary study. Utilizing multilevel modeling, our results suggest that daily coparenting is multidetermined. Indeed, daily fluctuations in coparenting were predicted by similar daily fluctuations in couple relationship quality, parent negative mood, parenting...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Longitudinal associations between parent-child relationships in middle childhood and child-perceived loneliness.
Loneliness may affect children’s psychological well-being and academic achievement. Parent-child relationships have been consistently associated with child adjustment. However, parental antecedents of child loneliness have been relatively understudied. Guided by attachment theory, we examined the trajectories of father-child and mother-child relationship closeness and conflict, and their associations with trajectories of child loneliness with National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD) data to understand parents’ roles in child loneli...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

DRD4 interacts with adverse life events in predicting maternal sensitivity via emotion regulation.
We examined whether and how the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) interacts with adverse life events to predict maternal sensitivity directly and indirectly via emotion regulation. The sample included 209 (106 European American, 103 African American) mothers and their children (52% female). Sensitive maternal behavior was rated and aggregated across five stress-free and stress-inducing tasks when children were about 2 years old, when mothers also retrospectively reported on their adverse life experiences and transitions throughout childhood from birth to age 20. When children were about 1 year old, mothers reported on their diff...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family rituals when children have cancer: A qualitative study.
Discussion of rituals can be integrated into interventions to optimize family interactions in the adverse context of pediatric cancer, via the readjustment of existing rituals, the creation of new ones and the reestablishing of old rituals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family health and income: A two-sample replication.
The current study examined psychological and family health predictors of change over time in household income, using data from longitudinal studies of African American (N = 889, 93.5% female) and Mexican origin (N = 674, 100% female) families. Participants self-reported their household income, as well as their emotional, personality, and cognitive resources. Participant behavioral and physical resources were coded from observed family interactions. Although income did not predict change in any personal resources, all five classes of personal resources (i.e., emotional, personality, cognitive, behavioral, physical) predicte...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

“The family that prays together . . .”: Relational processes associated with regular family prayer.
In the present article we explored how family prayer reportedly influenced family relationships. We conceptualized family prayer as a family ritual in religious families and used a qualitative methodology to interview a religiously, ethnically, and geographically diverse sample of 198 families (N = 476). Analysis of data revealed 7 related themes. Family prayer served important functions and influenced relationships in various ways including (a) as a time of family togetherness and interaction; (b) as a space for social support; and (c) as a means for intergenerational transmission of religion. Further, family prayer (d) i...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Marital processes linking economic hardship to mental health: The role of neurotic vulnerability.
Both enduring neurotic vulnerabilities and economic hardship have been shown to negatively influence marital behaviors, which have physical and mental health consequences. However, because most previous research is fragmented and has focused on the early years of marriage or relatively short periods of time, their long-term effects are unclear. Using data from the Iowa Midlife Transitions Project, with a sample of 370 married couples providing data from 1991 to 2001, we assessed enduring personal and couple vulnerabilities, trajectories of family economic hardship, and couples’ marital hostility using a comprehensive...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parent responsiveness and gender moderate bidirectional links between self-esteem and weight concerns during adolescence.
This study sought to clarify the role of self-esteem in the development of adolescents’ weight concerns and investigate the potentially protective role of father and mother responsiveness, another documented correlate of weight concerns. Participants were 392 predominately Caucasian/European American adolescents, ages 11–18, and their parents. Time-lagged mixed-effects models revealed bidirectional associations between self-esteem and weight concerns at the within-individual level over the course of adolescence. Results also confirmed the moderating roles of youth gender and father responsiveness in the prospec...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Interparental conflict and child HPA-axis responses to acute stress: Insights using intensive repeated measures.
This study further demonstrates the value of using intensive repeated measures and multiple reporters to characterize children’s psychosocial environment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Perceived regard, expressive suppression during conflict, and conflict resolution.
The way emotions are expressed during relationship conflict should play an important role in facilitating conflict resolution, but the risk of rejection that conflict poses may promote expressive suppression, which could impede conflict resolution. In the current research, the authors applied a risk regulation perspective to understand when expressive suppression will occur during conflict. They predicted that (a) perceiving lower regard from the partner during conflict would predict greater expressive suppression, and (b) greater expressive suppression would undermine conflict resolution. In Study 1, individuals engaged i...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The impact of marital withdrawal and secure base script knowledge on mothers’ and fathers’ parenting.
The current study examines associations between marital conflict and negative parenting behaviors among fathers and mothers, and the extent to which internal working models (IWMs) of attachment relationships may serve as sources of risk or resilience during family interactions. The sample consisted of 115 families (mothers, fathers, and their 6-month-old infants) who participated in a controlled experiment. Couples were randomly assigned to engage in either a conflict or positive marital discussion, followed by parent-infant freeplay sessions and assessment of parental IWMs of attachment (i.e., secure base script knowledge...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Healthy physical coactivity in parent–child dyads of children with overweight.
Parent and child physical activity levels are correlated, but are they interdependent? A dyadic version of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) was developed to investigate interdependence in the motivation and intention of parents and their children with overweight to engage in healthy physical coactivity (HPCA). Baseline measures of the TPB constructs (subjective norms, attitude, perceived behavior control, and intention) for both dyad members were used to predict parent—reports of their actual HPCA at 12 weeks using the actor–partner interdependence model. The sample included 65 mother–child dyads and ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The role of father parenting in children’s school readiness: A longitudinal follow-up.
Mother autonomy support has been shown to predict child executive function (EF) and school readiness; however, little is known about the influence of father parenting on these child outcomes. The current study is a longitudinal follow-up examining the bidirectional relations between father parenting and child EF/school readiness across the preschool period. Eighty-nine father−child dyads participated at 2 time points (mean child ages of 38 and 58 months). The first time point was described in a previous article by Meuwissen and Carlson (2015). At the second time point, we observed fathers’ autonomy support in a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Caregiver behaviors associated with emotion regulation in high-risk preschoolers.
Children who witness violence are at risk for developing a range of developmental problems, including deficits in understanding and regulating. The ability to adaptively manage emotions is associated with children’s mental health and their social and academic competence; however, little is known about how parents of at-risk youth can foster the healthy development of emotion regulation. The current study aimed to identify specific parenting practices associated with adaptive emotion regulation in at-risk preschoolers. Multimethod, multi-informant data were collected from 124 caregiver−child dyads from Head Star...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Transactions within the family: Coparenting mediates associations between parents’ relationship satisfaction and the parent–child relationship.
In the current study, we examined the potential for transactional relations among parents’ marital satisfaction, coparental cooperation and conflict, and parent–child relationship satisfaction in a sample of 249 families with 2–3-year-old children. Using a novel multiwave design with frequent assessments to better capture transactional family processes, mothers and fathers were assessed across 5 waves with 2-month lags; mean age of the target children (53% girls) was 2.8 years (SD = 0.62) at baseline. Cross-lagged, multilevel structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses using an actor–partner interde...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

More or less: Newlyweds’ preferred and received social support, affect, and relationship satisfaction.
Matching theories of social support suggest that receiving the amount and type of support one prefers from one’s romantic partner promotes more favorable affect and higher relationship satisfaction. Individuals who feel they are provided with less support from their partner than they desire (underprovision) generally experience less positive affect, more negative affect, and tend to be less satisfied in their relationships. However, research findings are mixed with regard to whether receiving more of a particular type of support from one’s partner than one desires (overprovision) is associated with more favorab...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Intervention effects on reflectivity explain change in positive parenting in military families with young children.
Military families with young children often experience stress related to the unique circumstances of military families (e.g., deployment), and there is a need for interventions that are specifically tailored to military families with young children. The Strong Military Families (SMF) intervention responds to this need, and consists of two versions: A Multifamily Group (N = 34), and a Homebased psychoeducational written material program (N = 42; treated as the comparison group in this report). The Multifamily Group utilized an attachment-based parenting education curriculum and in vivo support of separations and reunions, e...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Personality traits and parent–adolescent interactions: An observational study of Mexican origin families.
Parent–child interactions are likely influenced by the personality characteristics of both the parent and the child. However, questions remain concerning the bidirectional nature of these effects (e.g., does a child’s personality evoke changes in his or her parent’s behavior?). Furthermore, the existing literature is based primarily on European American children and generally relies on questionnaire measures of parent–child interactions rather than assessing behavior during observed interactions. To address these gaps in the literature, the authors evaluated reciprocal associations between personali...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Social support and relationship satisfaction in bipolar disorder.
Social support is positively associated with individual well-being, particularly if an intimate partner provides that support. However, despite evidence that individuals with bipolar disorder (BPD) are at high risk for relationship discord and are especially vulnerable to low or inadequate social support, little research has explored the relationship between social support and relationship quality among couples in which a partner has BPD. The current study addresses this gap in the literature by examining the association between social support and relationship satisfaction in a weekly diary study. Thirty-eight opposite-sex...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Financial stress response profiles and psychosocial functioning in low-income parents.
This study applies latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify and describe profiles of financial stress responses (problem solving, emotion regulation, emotion expression, cognitive restructuring, positive thinking, acceptance, distraction, denial, avoidance, wishful thinking, rumination, intrusive thoughts, emotional arousal, physiologic arousal, impulsive action, emotional numbing, cognitive interference, escape, and inaction) and examines associations between profile membership and psychosocial functioning in low-income parents. Five profiles were identified that were distinguished by self-reported voluntary and involunt...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Father attachment, father emotion expression, and children’s attachment to fathers: The role of marital conflict.
The current study examined relations between father attachment to spouses and child attachment to fathers in middle childhood, focusing on father emotion expressions in father–child interactions as mediators and marital conflict as a moderator of relations. Participants were 199 children between 6 and 12 years of age and their fathers. Fathers completed questionnaires about their attachment to their spouses, and both fathers and mothers reported on their marital conflict. Fathers also discussed a difficult topic with their children for 5 min, and fathers’ positive and negative emotion expression during the disc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The power of listening: Lending an ear to the partner during dyadic coping conversations.
Although active, responsive listening is widely assumed to be essential for well-functioning intimate relationships, the manner in which this important behavior might promote closeness remains unknown. To test the prediction that listening may be especially influential when partners disclose experiences of stress, we instructed 365 heterosexual couples to hold two 8-min conversations in which each partner discussed a stressful personal experience while the other partner was asked to respond as he or she ordinarily would. We coded expressions of stress and listening behavior at 10-s intervals during these conversations, app...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The trajectory of coparenting relationship quality across early adolescence: Family, community, and parent gender influences.
This study examined longitudinal change in coparenting support and conflict for married parents during their child’s adolescence, and the links between financial, work, and community factors and coparenting support and conflict. We utilized an ecological perspective, drawing on five waves of data from 635 dual-earner families with adolescents (M = 11.29, SD = .48 years old at Time 1). Applying a multilevel modeling approach and using reports from mothers and fathers we examined: (a) change in coparenting support and conflict over six years; (b) correlated change in contextual factors (financial strain, work hours and...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The link between coparenting cooperation and child social competence: The moderating role of child negative affect.
This study examined the moderating role of child negative affect in the link between coparenting cooperation and child social competence. Cross-sectional data were collected from a community sample of 258 Chinese families with preschool children (mean age = 5.19 years; 47% of them were girls), residing in Hong Kong, China. Using questionnaires, parents (80% of them were mothers) rated their children’s negative affect as well as their own coparenting cooperation, dyadic, parent-child nurturance, and marital love. Also, class teachers rated children’s peer acceptance and social cognition using questionnaires, and...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 31, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Maternal sensitivity to distress and attachment outcomes: Interactions with sensitivity to nondistress and infant temperament.
The extent to which maternal sensitivity to infant distress predicts specific attachment outcomes independent of and in conjunction with maternal sensitivity to infant nondistress and in conjunction with infant-negative emotionality was examined in a sample of 259 mother–infant dyads. Maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress was observed in a series of distress-eliciting tasks when infants were 6 months and 1-year-old. Mothers rated infant-negative emotionality at 6 months. Infant–mother attachment was observed during the “strange situation” (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 197...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Communally coping with diabetes: An observational investigation using the actor-partner interdependence model.
Communal coping is a form of interpersonal coping that involves a shared illness appraisal and collaborating to address illness-related issues. We hypothesized that communal coping among couples in which one person is recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes would be related to better diabetes problem-solving, better mood, greater relationship quality, and less psychological distress for both partners. Communal coping was coded from videotaped interactions in which 119 heterosexual couples discussed difficulties in managing diabetes. Actor-partner interdependence models were performed to isolate associations of actor commun...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Racial discrimination and relationship functioning among African American couples.
This study used dyadic data from 344 rural, predominantly low-income heterosexual African American couples with an early adolescent child to examine associations between self-reported racial discrimination, psychological and physical aggression, and relationship satisfaction and instability. Experiences of discrimination were common among men and women and were negatively associated with relationship functioning. Specifically, men reported higher levels of psychological aggression and relationship instability if they experienced higher levels of racial discrimination, and women reported higher levels of physical aggression...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Household chaos and family sleep during infants’ first year.
This study examines these relationships using objective measures of household chaos and sleep while controlling for, respectively, maternal emotional availability at bedtime and martial adjustment, in infant and parent sleep. Multilevel modeling examined mean and variability of sleep duration and fragmentation for infants, mothers, and fathers when infants were 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months (N = 167). Results indicated infants in higher chaos homes experienced delays in sleep consolidation patterns, with longer and more variable sleep duration, and greater fragmentation. Parent sleep was also associated with household chaos su...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Daily communication, conflict resolution, and marital quality in Chinese marriage: A three-wave, cross-lagged analysis.
Based on three annual waves of data obtained from 268 Chinese couples in the early years of marriage and using a three-wave, cross-lagged approach, the present study examined the associations among daily marital communication, marital conflict resolution, and marital quality. Results indicated unidirectional associations linking daily marital communication or marital conflict resolution to marital quality (instead of reciprocal associations); and when considered simultaneously in a single model, daily marital communication and marital conflict resolution explained variance in marital quality above and beyond each other. Fu...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Interpersonal processes and intimacy among men with localized prostate cancer and their partners.
The present study focused on intimacy processes in the relationships of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their partners. Using the actor–partner interdependence model (APIM), we examined the interpersonal process model of intimacy, which proposes associations between self- and perceived partner disclosure about cancer and perceived partner responsiveness as predictors of global relationship intimacy. The study’s outcomes were patients’ and spouses’ ratings of global relationship intimacy. Both actor (my disclosure predicts my intimacy) and partner (my partner’s disclosure predi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Sources of perceived responsiveness in family relationships.
This study used the SRM to determine the relative importance of these sources of perceived responsiveness in the relationships of 207 two-parent two-child families. Characteristics of the perceiver and the target each accounted for about 25% of the systematic variance in perceived responsiveness, whereas the perceiver–target relationship accounted for approximately 48%. At the individual level of analysis, reciprocity of perceived responsiveness was pervasive in the family relationships of the two children. Regardless of age, young people who generally perceived others as responsive were generally perceived by others...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Trauma exposure and aggression toward partners and children: Contextual influences of fear and anger.
This study illustrates a new method for studying contextual influences on aggressive behavior. Quarterly for 1 year, 94 men and 109 women with children age 2.5 years at study commencement were interviewed to measure the sequence of behaviors during aggressive incidents as well as the intensity of their emotions immediately prior to initiation of aggression. Within aggressive incidents, the number of acts of men’s PCA was predicted by men’s greater fear, anger, and trauma exposure, and the positive association between men’s trauma exposure and PCA perpetration was especially strong under conditions of high...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Temporality of couple conflict and relationship perceptions.
Using 5 waves of longitudinal survey data gathered from 3,405 couples, the present study investigates the temporal associations between self-reported couple conflict (frequency and each partner’s constructive and withdrawing behaviors) and relationship perceptions (satisfaction and perceived instability). Autoregressive cross-lagged model results revealed couple conflict consistently predicted future relationship perceptions: More frequent conflict and withdrawing behaviors and fewer constructive behaviors foretold reduced satisfaction and conflict frequency and withdrawal heightened perceived instability. Relationsh...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Sex through a sacred lens: Longitudinal effects of sanctification of marital sexuality.
Research attending to the role of religion and spirituality in enhancing sexuality in marriage is virtually absent. In response to this scarcity, this longitudinal study examined the sanctification of marital sexuality among newly married, heterosexual individuals (N = 67; married 4–18 months at Time 1). Greater sanctification of marital sexuality early in the marriage predicted more frequent sexual intercourse, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction 1 year later for individual respondents, after controlling for initial levels of the dependent variable as well as age, frequencies of religious service attendanc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parental warmth during childhood predicts coping and well-being in adulthood.
Numerous studies have shown that early life experiences can affect well-being later in life. Additionally, previous literature has emphasized the importance of exploring the role of mediators in developmental research (e.g., coping strategies). The present study used 3 waves of longitudinal data across 20 years from the national survey Midlife Development in the United States (N = 2,088) to examine the link between retrospectively reported parental warmth and well-being in adulthood by exploring 2 categories of coping strategies (emotion- and problem-focused strategies) as possible mediators. Three cross-lagged panel model...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Do day-to-day finances play a role in relationship satisfaction? A dyadic investigation.
Prior researchers have found consistent links between financial issues and relationship outcomes. Yet, because most research is cross-sectional or examines these constructs over longer periods of time (e.g., years), the microlevel processes of how and when these changes occur are unclear. In the present study, we use interdependence theory as a guide to examine the daily fluctuations of financial satisfaction and stress as well as their daily associations with relationship quality in married and unmarried heterosexual couples. Using a dyadic 14-day daily diary research design, we found both financial satisfaction and stres...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research