Family rituals when children have cancer: A qualitative study.
Discussion of rituals can be integrated into interventions to optimize family interactions in the adverse context of pediatric cancer, via the readjustment of existing rituals, the creation of new ones and the reestablishing of old rituals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family health and income: A two-sample replication.
The current study examined psychological and family health predictors of change over time in household income, using data from longitudinal studies of African American (N = 889, 93.5% female) and Mexican origin (N = 674, 100% female) families. Participants self-reported their household income, as well as their emotional, personality, and cognitive resources. Participant behavioral and physical resources were coded from observed family interactions. Although income did not predict change in any personal resources, all five classes of personal resources (i.e., emotional, personality, cognitive, behavioral, physical) predicte...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Healthy physical coactivity in parent–child dyads of children with overweight.
Parent and child physical activity levels are correlated, but are they interdependent? A dyadic version of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) was developed to investigate interdependence in the motivation and intention of parents and their children with overweight to engage in healthy physical coactivity (HPCA). Baseline measures of the TPB constructs (subjective norms, attitude, perceived behavior control, and intention) for both dyad members were used to predict parent—reports of their actual HPCA at 12 weeks using the actor–partner interdependence model. The sample included 65 mother–child dyads and ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The role of father parenting in children’s school readiness: A longitudinal follow-up.
Mother autonomy support has been shown to predict child executive function (EF) and school readiness; however, little is known about the influence of father parenting on these child outcomes. The current study is a longitudinal follow-up examining the bidirectional relations between father parenting and child EF/school readiness across the preschool period. Eighty-nine father−child dyads participated at 2 time points (mean child ages of 38 and 58 months). The first time point was described in a previous article by Meuwissen and Carlson (2015). At the second time point, we observed fathers’ autonomy support in a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Caregiver behaviors associated with emotion regulation in high-risk preschoolers.
Children who witness violence are at risk for developing a range of developmental problems, including deficits in understanding and regulating. The ability to adaptively manage emotions is associated with children’s mental health and their social and academic competence; however, little is known about how parents of at-risk youth can foster the healthy development of emotion regulation. The current study aimed to identify specific parenting practices associated with adaptive emotion regulation in at-risk preschoolers. Multimethod, multi-informant data were collected from 124 caregiver−child dyads from Head Star...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Transactions within the family: Coparenting mediates associations between parents’ relationship satisfaction and the parent–child relationship.
In the current study, we examined the potential for transactional relations among parents’ marital satisfaction, coparental cooperation and conflict, and parent–child relationship satisfaction in a sample of 249 families with 2–3-year-old children. Using a novel multiwave design with frequent assessments to better capture transactional family processes, mothers and fathers were assessed across 5 waves with 2-month lags; mean age of the target children (53% girls) was 2.8 years (SD = 0.62) at baseline. Cross-lagged, multilevel structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses using an actor–partner interde...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Personality traits and parent–adolescent interactions: An observational study of Mexican origin families.
Parent–child interactions are likely influenced by the personality characteristics of both the parent and the child. However, questions remain concerning the bidirectional nature of these effects (e.g., does a child’s personality evoke changes in his or her parent’s behavior?). Furthermore, the existing literature is based primarily on European American children and generally relies on questionnaire measures of parent–child interactions rather than assessing behavior during observed interactions. To address these gaps in the literature, the authors evaluated reciprocal associations between personali...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Social support and relationship satisfaction in bipolar disorder.
Social support is positively associated with individual well-being, particularly if an intimate partner provides that support. However, despite evidence that individuals with bipolar disorder (BPD) are at high risk for relationship discord and are especially vulnerable to low or inadequate social support, little research has explored the relationship between social support and relationship quality among couples in which a partner has BPD. The current study addresses this gap in the literature by examining the association between social support and relationship satisfaction in a weekly diary study. Thirty-eight opposite-sex...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Financial stress response profiles and psychosocial functioning in low-income parents.
This study applies latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify and describe profiles of financial stress responses (problem solving, emotion regulation, emotion expression, cognitive restructuring, positive thinking, acceptance, distraction, denial, avoidance, wishful thinking, rumination, intrusive thoughts, emotional arousal, physiologic arousal, impulsive action, emotional numbing, cognitive interference, escape, and inaction) and examines associations between profile membership and psychosocial functioning in low-income parents. Five profiles were identified that were distinguished by self-reported voluntary and involunt...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Father attachment, father emotion expression, and children’s attachment to fathers: The role of marital conflict.
The current study examined relations between father attachment to spouses and child attachment to fathers in middle childhood, focusing on father emotion expressions in father–child interactions as mediators and marital conflict as a moderator of relations. Participants were 199 children between 6 and 12 years of age and their fathers. Fathers completed questionnaires about their attachment to their spouses, and both fathers and mothers reported on their marital conflict. Fathers also discussed a difficult topic with their children for 5 min, and fathers’ positive and negative emotion expression during the disc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The trajectory of coparenting relationship quality across early adolescence: Family, community, and parent gender influences.
This study examined longitudinal change in coparenting support and conflict for married parents during their child’s adolescence, and the links between financial, work, and community factors and coparenting support and conflict. We utilized an ecological perspective, drawing on five waves of data from 635 dual-earner families with adolescents (M = 11.29, SD = .48 years old at Time 1). Applying a multilevel modeling approach and using reports from mothers and fathers we examined: (a) change in coparenting support and conflict over six years; (b) correlated change in contextual factors (financial strain, work hours and...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The link between coparenting cooperation and child social competence: The moderating role of child negative affect.
This study examined the moderating role of child negative affect in the link between coparenting cooperation and child social competence. Cross-sectional data were collected from a community sample of 258 Chinese families with preschool children (mean age = 5.19 years; 47% of them were girls), residing in Hong Kong, China. Using questionnaires, parents (80% of them were mothers) rated their children’s negative affect as well as their own coparenting cooperation, dyadic, parent-child nurturance, and marital love. Also, class teachers rated children’s peer acceptance and social cognition using questionnaires, and...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 31, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Communally coping with diabetes: An observational investigation using the actor-partner interdependence model.
Communal coping is a form of interpersonal coping that involves a shared illness appraisal and collaborating to address illness-related issues. We hypothesized that communal coping among couples in which one person is recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes would be related to better diabetes problem-solving, better mood, greater relationship quality, and less psychological distress for both partners. Communal coping was coded from videotaped interactions in which 119 heterosexual couples discussed difficulties in managing diabetes. Actor-partner interdependence models were performed to isolate associations of actor commun...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Racial discrimination and relationship functioning among African American couples.
This study used dyadic data from 344 rural, predominantly low-income heterosexual African American couples with an early adolescent child to examine associations between self-reported racial discrimination, psychological and physical aggression, and relationship satisfaction and instability. Experiences of discrimination were common among men and women and were negatively associated with relationship functioning. Specifically, men reported higher levels of psychological aggression and relationship instability if they experienced higher levels of racial discrimination, and women reported higher levels of physical aggression...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Household chaos and family sleep during infants’ first year.
This study examines these relationships using objective measures of household chaos and sleep while controlling for, respectively, maternal emotional availability at bedtime and martial adjustment, in infant and parent sleep. Multilevel modeling examined mean and variability of sleep duration and fragmentation for infants, mothers, and fathers when infants were 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months (N = 167). Results indicated infants in higher chaos homes experienced delays in sleep consolidation patterns, with longer and more variable sleep duration, and greater fragmentation. Parent sleep was also associated with household chaos su...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Interpersonal processes and intimacy among men with localized prostate cancer and their partners.
The present study focused on intimacy processes in the relationships of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their partners. Using the actor–partner interdependence model (APIM), we examined the interpersonal process model of intimacy, which proposes associations between self- and perceived partner disclosure about cancer and perceived partner responsiveness as predictors of global relationship intimacy. The study’s outcomes were patients’ and spouses’ ratings of global relationship intimacy. Both actor (my disclosure predicts my intimacy) and partner (my partner’s disclosure predi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Temporality of couple conflict and relationship perceptions.
Using 5 waves of longitudinal survey data gathered from 3,405 couples, the present study investigates the temporal associations between self-reported couple conflict (frequency and each partner’s constructive and withdrawing behaviors) and relationship perceptions (satisfaction and perceived instability). Autoregressive cross-lagged model results revealed couple conflict consistently predicted future relationship perceptions: More frequent conflict and withdrawing behaviors and fewer constructive behaviors foretold reduced satisfaction and conflict frequency and withdrawal heightened perceived instability. Relationsh...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Sex through a sacred lens: Longitudinal effects of sanctification of marital sexuality.
Research attending to the role of religion and spirituality in enhancing sexuality in marriage is virtually absent. In response to this scarcity, this longitudinal study examined the sanctification of marital sexuality among newly married, heterosexual individuals (N = 67; married 4–18 months at Time 1). Greater sanctification of marital sexuality early in the marriage predicted more frequent sexual intercourse, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction 1 year later for individual respondents, after controlling for initial levels of the dependent variable as well as age, frequencies of religious service attendanc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parental warmth during childhood predicts coping and well-being in adulthood.
Numerous studies have shown that early life experiences can affect well-being later in life. Additionally, previous literature has emphasized the importance of exploring the role of mediators in developmental research (e.g., coping strategies). The present study used 3 waves of longitudinal data across 20 years from the national survey Midlife Development in the United States (N = 2,088) to examine the link between retrospectively reported parental warmth and well-being in adulthood by exploring 2 categories of coping strategies (emotion- and problem-focused strategies) as possible mediators. Three cross-lagged panel model...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Do day-to-day finances play a role in relationship satisfaction? A dyadic investigation.
Prior researchers have found consistent links between financial issues and relationship outcomes. Yet, because most research is cross-sectional or examines these constructs over longer periods of time (e.g., years), the microlevel processes of how and when these changes occur are unclear. In the present study, we use interdependence theory as a guide to examine the daily fluctuations of financial satisfaction and stress as well as their daily associations with relationship quality in married and unmarried heterosexual couples. Using a dyadic 14-day daily diary research design, we found both financial satisfaction and stres...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

“You’re forgiven, but don’t do it again!” Direct partner regulation buffers the costs of forgiveness.
Although forgiveness can have numerous benefits, it can also have a notable cost—forgiveness can allow transgressors to continue behaving in ways that can be hurtful (McNulty, 2010, 2011). Accordingly, two studies tested the prediction that the implications of forgiveness for whether the partner transgresses or fails to behave benevolently depend on whether forgivers regulate partners away from future transgressions and toward benevolent behaviors. Study 1 was an experimental study of emerging adult couples in which participants were (a) asked to report their partners’ tendencies to engage in partner-regulation...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Multiple domains of new mothers’ adaptation: Interrelations and roots in childhood maternal nonsupportive emotion socialization.
This study focused on the interrelations among different domains of maternal adaptation (i.e., emotion-regulation difficulties, depressive symptoms, and couple-relationship satisfaction) over the transition to parenthood and also their associations with mothers’ recalled childhood maternal nonsupportive emotion socialization. Data were obtained from a socioeconomically and racially diverse sample of 196 primiparous mothers during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy and at 6 months postpartum. Results indicated that (a) mothers’ adaptation in different domains had shared roots in their recalled childhood maternal non...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Bidirectional effects between parenting sensitivity and child behavior: A cross-lagged analysis across middle childhood and adolescence.
Using a longitudinal, cross-lagged design, this study examined the bidirectional relations between mothers’ and fathers’ sensitivity and children’s externalizing (EXT) and internalizing (INT) behavior from middle childhood into adolescence. The subsample comprised families (N = 578) in which the mother and father cohabitated from the study’s first time point (child age = 54 months) through Age 15 in the longitudinal NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Study results revealed differential patterns for mother–child and father–child relations in the full sample and separat...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Longitudinal associations between family members’ internalizing symptoms across middle childhood.
An individual’s internalizing symptoms have been shown to relate to greater symptoms in family members. However, an examination of how family members’ symptoms are associated with one another is needed with a model including mothers, fathers, and children. Using 633 families from the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the current study examines relations between different family members’ internalizing symptoms over time. In the archival data set, mothers’, fathers’, and children’s internalizing symptoms at first, thi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Disclosure and holding back: Communication, psychological adjustment, and marital satisfaction among couples coping with osteoarthritis.
This study examined two types of illness-related communication (disclosure and holding back) and their associations with psychological adjustment and marital satisfaction in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and their spouses. A sample of 142 couples reported on disclosure and holding back of OA-related concerns, marital satisfaction, and depressive symptoms at two time points across 1 year. Results from dyadic analyses indicated that holding back was associated with decreases in one’s own marital satisfaction for patients and spouses and increases in one’s own depressive symptoms for spouses over 1 year. ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Reconsidering the links between sibship size, maternal sensitivity, and child attachment: A multidimensional interactive approach.
Despite being a well-documented predictor of children’s cognitive and social development, sibship has received remarkably little attention in the attachment and maternal sensitivity literature. The only study that has examined both sensitivity and attachment in relation to sibship found greater maternal sensitivity but no more secure attachment among first-born infants. In the current study, we sought to examine the same links while testing two related hypotheses: that sibship size relates only to some specific aspects of sensitivity, and that sibship size relates to sensitivity only among certain mothers, namely tho...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

“Can’t live with or without them:” Transitions and young adults’ perceptions of sibling relationships.
Extant research documents how siblings’ relationships develop from childhood through adolescence; yet, we know little about how sibling relationships change in young adulthood. Rooted in life course theory, this 2-wave longitudinal study investigated changes in sibling closeness and conflict, and the roles of life transitions and sibling similarity in life stage. Participants included 273 young adults from 180 families who reported on 340 sibling relationships (Time 1 M age = 24.45, SD = 5.33; Time 2 M age = 30.23, SD = 5.33). Multilevel repeated measures analysis of covariance indicated that, on average, siblings&rs...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Negative relationship behavior is more important than positive: Correlates of outcomes during stressful life events.
When people who are married or cohabiting face stressful life situations, their ability to cope may be associated with two separate dimensions of interpersonal behavior: positive and negative. These behaviors can be assessed with the Couple Resilience Inventory (CRI). It was expected that scales on this instrument would correlate with outcome variables regarding life well-being, stress, and relationship satisfaction. It was also expected that effects for negative behavior would be larger than effects for positive and that the effects might be curvilinear. Study 1 included 325 married or cohabiting people currently experien...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Patterns of perceived partner responsiveness and well-being in Japan and the United States.
Quality of marital relationships is consistently linked to personal well-being. However, almost all of the studies linking marital processes to well-being have been conducted in Western (particularly North American) countries. Growing evidence shows that perceived partner responsiveness is a central relationship process predicting well-being in Western contexts but little is known about whether this association generalizes to other countries. The present work investigated whether the predictive role of perceived partner responsiveness in well-being differs across the United States and Japan—2 contexts with contrastin...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Longitudinal effects of increases and decreases in intimate partner aggression.
Interventions aimed at reducing interpartner aggression assume that within-couple declines in aggression enhance individual and relational outcomes, yet reductions in aggression may fail to yield these benefits when other risk-generating mechanisms remain intact. The present study evaluates this possibility by investigating whether naturally observed within-couple changes in aggression are associated with improved individual and relational outcomes in the manner assumed by intervention programs. Drawing upon 4 waves of data collected at 9-month intervals from a community sample of 431 newlywed couples (76% Hispanic) living...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Effects of parent-adolescent reported family functioning discrepancy on physical activity and diet among Hispanic youth.
Research has shown that family functioning has been positively associated with physical activity and dietary intake, both of which are obesity-related risk factors. The most widely practiced methodological approach to assessing this construct in empirical studies relies on either parent or adolescent report. Yet, discrepancy in parent and adolescent report of family functioning may provide a fuller understanding of the effects of this construct on obesity-related health outcomes. This is especially important among Hispanics, a population that suffers from disproportionately high rates of obesity and its health-related cons...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Patterns of family management for adolescent and young adult brain tumor survivors.
Little is known about how families systemically incorporate the work of caring for adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors of childhood brain tumors who often remain dependent on their families well into adulthood. The primary aim of this study was to develop a typology of family management (FM) patterns for AYA survivors. The secondary aims were to compare them with FM patterns previously described for children with chronic health conditions and to validate the patterns using quantitative and qualitative data. Guided by the Family Management Styles Framework, a sequential, mixed-methods design was used to gather quanti...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family cohesion and enmeshment moderate associations between maternal relationship instability and children’s externalizing problems.
This study examined the moderating roles of 2 different types of family-level closeness (i.e., family cohesion and enmeshment) in associations between maternal relationship instability and children’s externalizing problems in early childhood. Participants in this longitudinal (i.e., 2 waves of data collection spaced 2 years apart), multimethod (i.e., survey, observations), multi-informant (i.e., parent, teacher, observer) study included 243 preschool children (Mage = 4.60 years) and their parents. Findings from the lagged, autoregressive tests of the predictive pathways indicated that family cohesion and enmeshment m...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

(Why) do victims become perpetrators? Intergenerational transmission of parental violence in a representative German sample.
Child maltreatment can severely impair children’s emotional and physical well-being as well as their individual development across the life span. In 2011, the Criminological Research Institute of Lower Saxony (Germany), conducted a nationally representative victim survey on diverse forms of victimizations (N = 11,428). Among other things, experienced and exerted parental violence as well as participants’ knowledge regarding the abolition of the parental right of corporal punishment were assessed. Apart from providing current estimates of the prevalence of experienced and exerted parental violence in Germany, we...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Premarital education and later relationship help-seeking.
Despite evidence that empirically supported couple therapies improve marital relationships, relatively few couples seek help when they need it. Low-income couples are particularly unlikely to engage in relationship interventions despite being at greater risk for distress and dissolution than their higher-income counterparts. The present study aimed to clarify how premarital education influences couples’ progression through different stages of later help-seeking, as identified in prior research. Using 5 waves of self-report data from a sample of 431 ethnically diverse newlywed couples living in low-income neighborhood...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

A randomized controlled trial comparing family mediation with and without motivational interviewing.
Family mediation is a widely used approach to assist separated parents to resolve conflicts about parenting arrangements for their children, yet frequently parents undertaking mediation do not reach a mutually agreeable resolution. In Australia, where the current study was conducted, separated parents must attempt family mediation before they can seek to appear in the family court for custody issues. We compared mediation enhanced with motivational interviewing (MI) with mediation as usual (MAU) in a randomized controlled trial. One hundred and seventy-seven separated-parent dyads were recruited from a community-based tele...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Birth Experiences Questionnaire: A brief measure assessing psychosocial dimensions of childbirth.
In conclusion, the BEQ can be administered shortly after birth to both parents, and may capture important dimensions of the perinatal experience. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Relationships with former stepgrandparents after remarriage dissolution.
Increases in stepfamily formation and longevity suggest that more children have stepgrandparent relationships than ever before. Because remarriages end in divorce more often than first marriages, many children experience the involuntary dissolution of stepgrandparent ties. Little is known about stepgrandparent relationships in general, and even less is known about how these relationships are affected by remarriage dissolution. Guided by symbolic interaction theory, the purpose of this study was to understand how stepgrandchildren make sense of their relationships with former stepgrandparents. We explored their perceptions ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Longitudinal associations of maternal depression and adolescents’ depression and behaviors: Moderation by maltreatment and sex.
This study explored the longitudinal relationships among maternal depressive symptoms, children’s depressive symptoms, aggression, and rule breaking and tested the moderating effects of maltreatment and child sex. A sample of 175 biological mother-child dyads (86 maltreated and 89 comparison) were seen at three time points, beginning at an average child age of 10.87 years. Results from cross-lagged models showed maternal depressive symptoms were related to higher levels of children’s depressive symptoms but not children’s aggression or rule breaking. Rule breaking predicted maternal depressive symptoms on...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Child internalizing problems and mother–child discrepancies in maternal rejection: Evidence for bidirectional associations.
We investigated the bidirectional associations between mother–child discrepancies in their perceptions of maternal rejection and children’s internalizing problems over 10 years from pre/early adolescence to early adulthood. Mothers’ reports of rejection and involvement in the parent–child relationship, the children’s perception of the mother’s rejection, and children’s self-report of internalizing problems were collected from a sample of 360 low-income ethnically diverse urban mother–child dyads at three time points (T1, T2, and T3) with 5-year intervals. Children were on ave...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parent contributions to friendship stability during the primary school years.
The present study examines whether characteristics of parents predict the stability of a child’s best friendships across the primary school years. Participants included 1,523 Finnish children (766 boys) who reported involvement in a total of 1,326 reciprocated friendship dyads in the 1st grade (M = 7.16 years old). At the onset of the study, mothers and fathers completed questionnaires describing their own parenting (i.e., behavioral control, psychological control, and affection toward the child) and depressive symptoms. Child scores for peer status (i.e., acceptance and rejection) were derived from 1st grade peer no...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Coparenting in the family of origin and new parents’ couple relationship functioning.
To better understand the long-term implications of coparenting quality for adult child outcomes, we examined the associations between coparenting quality in the family of origin (Generation 1; G1), and attachment avoidance and anxiety and perceived relationship functioning of new parents (Generation 2; G2) using a dyadic approach. Dual-earner families expecting their first child (n = 182) were followed across the transition to parenthood and assessed at the third trimester of pregnancy (3T) and 9 months after childbirth (9M). At 3T, parents reported on the coparenting quality in their families of origin, and attachment avo...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Adult adiposity linked to relationship hostility for low-cortisol reactors.
Past research on the relation between hostility in intimate relationships and adiposity has yielded mixed findings. The present study investigated whether the association between relationship hostility and adiposity is moderated by people’s biological reactions to couple conflict. Cohabiting adult couples (N = 117 couples) engaged in two conflict interactions, before and after which salivary cortisol levels were measured. Results revealed an association between relationship hostility and adiposity, but this association was concentrated among people with relatively low levels of cortisol reactivity to couple conflict....
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Stress spillover, African Americans’ couple and health outcomes, and the stress-buffering effect of family-centered prevention.
This study investigated (a) the stress spillover pathways linking contextual stressors, changes in couple relationship functioning and depressive symptoms, and changes in individuals’ physical health, and (b) the stress-buffering effect of participation in an efficacious, family centered prevention program designed to protect couples from the deleterious effects of stressors. The sample consisted of 346 rural African American couples (63% married) who participated in a randomized controlled trial of the Protecting Strong African American Families (ProSAAF) program. Participants were assessed at three time points acro...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Interparental conflict and long-term adolescent substance use trajectories: The role of adolescent threat appraisals.
Although interparental conflict (IPC) has been linked directly and indirectly (via adolescents’ appraisals) with a wide range of adolescent outcomes, little is known about the implications of IPC and related adolescent threat appraisals for substance use. Drawing on the cognitive-contextual framework, we test competing hypotheses about how IPC may impact adolescent substance use outcomes, specifically testing whether (a) threat appraisals are directly related to escalation in alcohol and tobacco use over adolescence, or (b) threat appraisals are indirectly associated with substance use through their impact on adolesc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Family rituals in pediatric epilepsy: Links to parental competence and adaptation.
This cross-sectional study examined the associations between family ritual meaning and 3 indicators of parental adaptation (anxious and depressive symptoms and quality of life) via 2 dimensions of parental competence—satisfaction and efficacy—in parents of children with epilepsy. Two hundred Portuguese parents of children diagnosed with epilepsy for at least 6 months completed self-report measures assessing the main study variables. Our results showed that when parents reported stronger family ritual meaning, they also reported higher levels of parental satisfaction and efficacy, which were in turn were associa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Early adolescents’ relationships with parents, teachers, and peers and increases in social anxiety symptoms.
Previous research on social anxiety has clearly identified interpersonal relationships as important for social anxiety symptoms. Few studies, however, have utilized longitudinal designs and have examined mechanisms that might explain links between negative interpersonal relationships and changes in youths’ social anxiety over time. Recent models of social anxiety suggest that negative interpersonal relationships are linked to social anxiety through effects on social skills and behaviors. Using an autoregressive design and a sample of 416 two-parent families (51% female, 91% White), this study examined whether connect...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parental executive function and verbal ability matter for scaffolding.
In this study, parents and preschool-aged children completed a challenging puzzle to assess scaffolding. EF and verbal ability were measured for parents and children. Parental verbal ability was used as an index of global higher-order cognitive function. Higher levels of parental EF related to more effective scaffolding, above and beyond parental verbal ability and independent of child cognitive level. These results highlight the significance of considering parental cognitive capacities in future studies to better understand the sources of individual differences in scaffolding. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all r...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Diabetes-specific family conflict: Informant discrepancies and the impact of parental factors.
Family conflict in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been linked to worse disease management (i.e., glycemic control, adherence to treatment regimen) and reduced quality of life. We sought to examine parental risk factors associated with increased levels of diabetes-specific family conflict and to investigate the discrepancies between parent and adolescent reports of conflict. Adolescents with T1D and their parents (N = 120 dyads) completed measures of diabetes-specific family conflict. Adolescents also reported on health-related quality of life, and parents reported on demographic information. Clinical data were ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Coparenting and children’s disruptive behavior: Interacting processes for parenting sense of competence.
We examined mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions of children’s disruptive behavior and the quality of coparenting, as well as their interaction in association with PSOC. Mothers and fathers from 108 ‘intact’ families participating in the Twins, Family, and Behavior (TFaB) Study reported on their children’s disruptive behavior, coparenting and PSOC via postal questionnaire (Mchild age = 6 years, SDchild age = 6.12 months). Dyadic multilevel analyses revealed that higher levels of children’s disruptive behavior related to lower levels of parents’ PSOC and perceptions of higher-qua...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research