Nursing Research Priorities in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN): Reaching consensus Through the Delphi Method
Pediatric emergency nurses who are directly involved in clinical care are in key positions to identify the needs and concerns of patients and their families. The 2010 Institute of Medicine report on the future of nursing supports the active participation of nurses in the design and implementation of solutions to improve health outcomes. Although prior efforts have assessed the need for research education within the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN), no systematic efforts have assessed nursing priorities for research in the pediatric ED setting. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - September 16, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Warren D. Frankenberger, Amy Pasmann, Jackie Noll, Mary Kate Abbadessa, Rupinder Sandhu, Darcy Brodecki, Elizabeth Ely Tags: Research Source Type: research

Women ’s Experiences of Miscarriage in the Emergency Department
The objective of this study was to identify characteristics of care management that may have contributed to the difficulties experienced by women presenting with miscarriage in the emergency department. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - September 5, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Dana ë Larivière-Bastien, Francine deMontigny, Chantal Verdon Tags: Research Source Type: research

If you could Change 1 Thing to Improve the Quality of Emergency Care for Deliberate Self-harm Patients, What would it be? A National Survey of Nursing Leadership
This study sought to understand emergency department nursing leadership perspectives on how to improve the quality of emergency care for these patients. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - September 5, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Sara Wiesel Cullen, Amaya Diana, Mark Olfson, Steven C. Marcus Tags: Research Source Type: research

Human Trafficking Victim Identification, Assessment, And Intervention Strategies In South Texas Emergency Departments
Human-trafficking victims seek assistance for health issues in emergency departments. This point of contact provides an opportunity for screening and identification of the victim ’s situation, enabling intervention. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - September 3, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jean Dowling Dols, Diana Beckmann-Mendez, Jessica McDow, Katherine Walker, Michael D. Moon Tags: Research Source Type: research

Experiences of Care in the Emergency Department Among a Sample of Homeless Male Veterans: A Qualitative Study
Homeless populations are historically high users of the emergency department for low-acuity issues that could be treated in more appropriate settings such as primary care. Veterans make up 11% of the homeless adult population and are often seen in community and Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) emergency departments. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of a sample of homeless male veterans as they attempt to access health care in the emergency department. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 29, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jillian J. Weber, Rebecca C. Lee, Donna Martsolf Tags: Research Source Type: research

Patient Preference for Medical Information in the Emergency Department: Post-Test Survey of a Random Allocation Intervention
Health literacy can create barriers for ED staff attempting to communicate important information to patients. Video discharge instructions may address some of these barriers by improving patients ’ comprehension of medical information and addressing health literacy challenges. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Johnathan M. Sheele, Jasmin Bhangu, Ayana Wilson, Ed Mandac Tags: Research Source Type: research

Contrast Extravasation as a Complication of Emergency Nurse-Performed Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Placement
The objective of the current study was to compare the contrast extravasation rate for ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous (USGPIV) catheter placement by emergency nurses with peripheral intravenous catheters placed by standard landmark techniques. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Mark Favot, John Gallien, Adrienne Malik, Adam Kasten, Robert Wells, Robert Ehrman Tags: Research Source Type: research

Contamination in Adult Midstream Clean-Catch Urine Cultures in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial
A midstream clean-catch urine sample is recommended to obtain a urine culture in symptomatic adults with suspected urinary tract infection. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine whether a novel funnel urine-collection system combined with a silver-colloidal cleaning wipe would decrease mixed flora contamination in midstream clean-catch urine cultures from ambulatory adults in the emergency department. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Mary E. Lough, Edward Shradar, Chuyun Hsieh, Haley Hedlin Tags: Research Source Type: research

Weight! Weight! … Don’t Tell Me!
Weight-based, lifesaving medications are commonly used in hospitals and routinely used in emergency departments.1 Many weight-based medications are listed in the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) high-alert medication list. According to ISMP, “high-alert medications are drugs that bear a heightened risk of causing significant patient harm when they are used in error.”2 These frequently used medications include anticoagulants (eg, heparin and enoxaparin), antibiotics for septic shock (eg, vancomycin and tobramycin), fibrinolytic agent s for stroke (eg, alteplase), and antiepileptic drugs (eg, phenyt...
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Avani Bhalodia, Mona Hammam, Susan F. Paparella Tags: Danger Zone Source Type: research

Child Maltreatment
Review questions and answers on topics about which nurses should be knowledgeable. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Scott DeBoer, Michael Seaver Tags: Pediatric Nursing Review Questions Source Type: research

Tension Pneumothorax: What Is an Effective Treatment?
Many emergency nurses have memorized the phrase “needle decompression 2ICS MCL” (translation: second intercostal space, mid clavicular line) as the intervention for a tension pneumothorax. However, if you believe in using an evidence-based approach to emergency nursing practice and examine the effectiveness of this intervention, you may be su rprised at the challenges related to site placement and needle length, along with failure rates. For example, consider the following cases that have been reported in the literature. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Diane Gurney Tags: Trauma Notebook Source Type: research

The Top 10 Pitfalls to Avoid When Caring for the Older Adult: Part I
Aging adult physiology creates interesting challenges —and potential pitfalls—relating to the provision of care. Over the years, this column has attempted to increase awareness of changes associated with aging that affect care for the older adult, thus helping nurses recognize and avoid practice pitfalls. This is the first in a series of Geriatric Update Section articles to appear in JEN that aim to review and provide a synopsis of 10 pitfalls associated with caring for an older adult. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Joan Somes Tags: Geriatric Update Source Type: research

CE Earn Up to 5.5 Contact Hours by Reading the  Designated Articles and Taking These Post Tests
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

CE Enrollment Form
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

Clinical Test Questions
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

Research Test questions
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

Clinical Practice Guideline: Massive Transfusion Scoring Systems
Which massive transfusion scoring systems are most useful and effective in predicting the need for massive transfusion in adult non-military emergency department trauma patients? (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: 2018 ENA Clinical Practice Guideline Committee, Board of Directors Liaisons:, Methodologist:, Staff Liaisons:, Administrative Staff: Tags: Clinical Practice Guideline Source Type: research

Emergency Nurse Orientation
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Mary Ellen Zaleski Tags: ENA Position Statement Source Type: research

Emergency Care Policy and a Rare Condition: The Impact of Technology
After I testified at a Congressional subcommittee in support of the Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMS-C) reauthorization in June, a listener reached out to contact me. She had originally tuned in to the livestream to listen to a physician ’s testimony in support of another house bill, the “Newborn Screening Saves Lives” reauthorization act. This mother shared the story of her son Travis, who had isolated congenital asplenia (ICA). Having never heard of ICA I went to the website in her e-mail (www.team4travis.org) to learn more. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Patricia Kunz Howard Tags: President ’s Message Source Type: research

Innovating Emergency Nursing Tools and Technology: Work Design for Quality and Patient Safety
“We can choose a technological solution to the profound humane disconnection that exists today in healthcare; a more humane medicine, enabled by machine support, can be the path forward.”1(p.309) (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jessica Castner Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Accidental and Unintentional Findings From the Midstream Clean-Catch Urine Contamination Study: Insights From Applying the Behavior Engineering Model
Over 2.6 million ED visits across the United States result in a primary diagnosis of urinary tract infection.1 While much attention has been paid to reducing blood culture contamination rates in the emergency department,2-9 a substantial gap remains in projects aimed at reducing contamination in clean-catch urine specimens obtained in the ED setting. Obtaining an adequate urine culture is clinically important to the care of several vulnerable patient groups, including patients with diabetes or compromised immune responses, those with high risk for subsequent urosepsis, previous antibiotic resistant infections, multiple ant...
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jessica Castner Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Information for Readers
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 22, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Immunotherapy Adverse Events: An Emergency Nursing Perspective
A 70-year-old man presented to the emergency department on a Saturday with complaints of shortness of breath, especially with activity; increased dry cough; and generalized weakness. He denied chest pain or hemoptysis. The patient reported a history of coronary artery disease; coronary artery bypass surgery; and lung cancer treated with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Most recently, he received treatment in his oncologist's office approximately 5  days before. His resting vital signs were as follows: blood pressure 150/54 mm Hg, heart rate 86 beats per minute, temperature 37°C (98.6°F), resp...
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 8, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Enza Esposito Nguyen, Elizabeth Winokur Tags: Clinical Source Type: research

Are Emergency Departments in the United States Following Recommendations by the Emergency Severity Index to Promote Quality Triage and Reliability?
The purpose of this study was to explore and describe (1) the extent to which emergency departments in the United States are promoting the quality of triage and the reliability of triage systems according to recommendations in the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) Handbook and (2) if relationships existed between triage structure (policies) and process (procedures) in emergency departments that promote accuracy of triage decisions. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - August 2, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Murtis Worth, Leslie L. Davis, Debra C. Wallace, Robin Bartlett, Debbie Travers Tags: Research Source Type: research

Code Critical: Improving Care Delivery for Critically Ill Patients in the Emergency Department
Although certain critically ill patients in emergency departments —such as those experiencing trauma, stroke, and myocardial infarction—often receive care through coordinated team responses, resource allocation and care delivery can vary widely for other high-acuity patients. The absence of a well-defined response process for these patients may result in delay s in care, suboptimal outcomes, and staff dissatisfaction. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to develop, implement, and evaluate an ED-specific alert team response for critically ill medical adult and pediatric patients not meeting crite...
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Andrea Perry Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

Automated Dispensing Cabinets Can Help or Hinder Patient Safety Based On the Implementation of Safeguard Strategies
Automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs), also known as automated distribution devices or automated dispensing machines, were first introduced in hospitals in the 1980s and function as an electronic point-of-care storage device for medication distribution.1-5 Varying levels of decentralized drug distribution can be accomplished using an ADC, including in outpatient areas, such as the emergency department.6-8 ADC functionality has advanced over the years, providing the potential for safety advantages compared with nonautomated storage options, such as reduced medication selection errors, enhanced efficiency among nursing and ph...
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Samantha J. Burton Tags: Danger Zone Source Type: research

Intracranial Infection Mimics Acute Stroke in an Adolescent Male
An 18-year-old male adolescent was brought to the emergency department by ambulance from a residential substance use disorder treatment program. His chief complaint was weakness. Medics reported that approximately 2 hours prior to arrival at the emergency department, the patient told program staff that he had weakness in his right hand and a headache. The patient maintained normal vital signs during transport and demonstrated no objective neurologic deficits. The patient ’s medical history included polysubstance use disorder (alcohol, marijuana, and benzodiazepines), migraine headaches, and a recent sinus infection. ...
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Cristy L. Galvin, Patricia A. Normandin, Karolyn S. Horn, Justin C. Popso Tags: Pediatric Update Source Type: research

Providing Hope Amidst Extreme Poverty, Chronic Health Concerns, and Violence: One Medical Team ’s Experience in Guatemala City
With nearly 18 million inhabitants, Guatemala has the largest population in Central America. It is also a country where approximately 51% of people live in poverty and the  health status of the poor, particularly indigenous Guatemalans, continues to be the worst in the Western hemisphere.1 Our 8-person medical team, which went to Guatemala City in September 2018, consisted of a physician, an RN, 2 pharmacists, a medical assistant, an occupational therapist, and 2 sup port workers (Figure 1). We had the privilege of partnering with Life of Hope Ministries as part of a medical team working with Corazon de Amor (&ld...
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Emergency Nursing Review Questions: July  2019
These review questions are based on the Emergency Nursing Core Curriculum and other pertinent resources to emergency nursing practice. They offer emergency nurses an opportunity to test their knowledge about their practice. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Benny Marett Tags: Emergency Nursing Review Questions Source Type: research

Emergency Nurse Duty Hours and Patient Safety
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Judith Carol Gentry Tags: ENA Position Statement Source Type: research

Not Just Chest Pain: Presenting Symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndrome by Gender: A Research to Practice Summary
The triage nurse must be vigilant in identifying vague, nuanced symptoms and gender differences for patients presenting to the emergency department with symptoms of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Identifying a female patient presenting for triage with symptoms of ACS requires additional consideration for mild, vague, or nonclassic symptoms compared with male patients. In this issue of Journal of Emergency Nursing, Mirzaei and colleagues1 contribute evidence to triage practice, with an opportunity to review nursing knowledge on presenting complaints and symptoms likely to be related to ACS. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Andi L. Foley Tags: Triage Decisions Source Type: research

Caring for our Past, Present, and Future
My dad was once left unattended in an ED treatment space on a stretcher with the side rails down. This situation is concerning in and of itself, but when considering his chief complaint —an aura that predicted he was going to have a seizure—it is clear that leaving him in that condition was quite simply poor judgment. About a year prior to this day, he had experienced a posterior hemisphere intracerebral hemorrhage. After his recovery and rehabilitation, an aura appeared prior to the occurrence of a complex tonic-clonic seizure. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Patricia Kunz Howard Tags: President ’s Message Source Type: research

The Symptom Science Model: A Shared Mental Model to Advance the Next Generation of Knowledge in the Emergency Nursing Specialty
Reciting a pledge is a common, inspiring, international right of passage for nurses in graduation ceremonies. One of these pledges, commonly referred to as the International Council of Nurses ’ Pledge, includes the following line: “I will endeavor to keep my professional knowledge and skills at the highest level.”1 All of us engaged in the Journal of Emergency Nursing (JEN) are committed to providing resources and information so that we, as the emergency nursing specialty, fulfill this promise every day. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Jessica Castner Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

CE Earn Up to 7.5 Contact Hours by Reading the Designated Articles and Taking These Post Tests
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

CE Enrollment Form
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

Clinical Test Questions
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

Research Test questions
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

Practice Improvement Test Questions
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Tags: CE Tests Source Type: research

Clinical Practice Guideline: Needle-Related or Minor Procedural Pain in Pediatric Patients
Is there evidence of pain and distress reduction in pediatric patients who receive analgesic or anxiolytic interventions during needle-related or minor invasive procedures in the emergency department? (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: ENA Clinical Practice Guideline Committee, ENA Board of Directors Liaisons:, Methodologist:, Staff Liaisons:, Administrative Staff: Tags: Clinical Practice Guideline Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Information for Readers
(Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - July 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: research

Using Buzzy, Shotblocker, and Bubble Blowing in a Pediatric Emergency Department to Reduce the Pain and Fear Caused by Intramuscular Injection: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Procedural pain in general, and intramuscular (IM) injection pain in particular, is one of the most distressing and painful health care experiences for children. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods are used as forms of pain control for children undergoing acute painful interventions in emergency departments. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - June 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Gamze Yilmaz, Dilek K üçük Alemdar Tags: Research Source Type: research

Improving 3-Hour Sepsis Bundled Care Outcomes: Implementation of a Nurse-Driven Sepsis Protocol in the Emergency Department
Sepsis, a life-threatening condition, can rapidly progress to death. The Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) program has implemented bundled care metrics for sepsis care, but timely completion of these interventions is challenging. Best-practice interventions could improve patient outcomes and reimbursement. The purpose of this project was to improve the timeliness of sepsis recognition and implementation of bundled care interventions in the emergency department. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - June 21, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Wendy R. Moore, Alicia Vermuelen, Rachelle Taylor, David Kihara, Erik Wahome Tags: Practice Improvement Source Type: research

Alpha-Gal: A Delayed Onset of Anaphylaxis and Uncovering the Cause
A 67-year-old man was driving his car down the expressway when he noticed that his hands were swollen, red, and extremely itchy. The patient was having difficulty breathing, swallowing, and talking, and his tongue was swollen. He pulled over at a rest stop, got out of his car, found 2 men working at the rest stop building, and asked for help. The patient was experiencing extreme itching and shaking. The 2 men sat him in a chair and called 911. The patient appeared to be very confused, and, as the paramedics arrived, the patient had a sudden loss of consciousness. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - May 27, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Diane C. Berry, Laura Britton, Letha M. Joseph, Ann Jessup Tags: Case Review Source Type: research

Deadly and Near-Deadly Drownings
1. A 2-year-old is pulled from an icy pond and transferred in full cardiopulmonary arrest to your facility. The single most important factor influencing survival is: (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Scott DeBoer, Michael Seaver Tags: Pediatric Nursing Review Questions Source Type: research

Strategies for Reversal of Warfarin Following Acute Bleed
A patient with altered mental status presents via EMS after being found by family. She has a medical history significant for hypertension, diabetes, and atrial fibrillation for which she receives oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention. After the initial workup comes back negative, a computed tomographic scan of the brain is performed and the patient is found to have a large intraparenchymal hemorrhage that extends into the ventricles. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Brian W. Gilbert, Tessa Reynolds, Joel B. Huffman, Katherine Hall Tags: Pharm/Tox Corner Source Type: research

Mocks: Making a Difference
As practicing emergency nurses, we are all very aware of the horrific impact that trauma has on our patients, their families, and society. In the United States, trauma is the leading cause of death for persons ages 1 to 44 years.1 According to 2015 statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the annual costs of health care and lost productivity were higher in trauma care than for any other major disease process: cancer cost the US economy $216 billion, diabetes $245 billion, heart disease $313 billion, and trauma $671 billion. (Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN)
Source: Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN - May 1, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Darleen A. Williams Tags: Advanced Practice Spotlight Source Type: research