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CD163+ macrophages promote angiogenesis and vascular permeability accompanied by inflammation in atherosclerosis
Intake of hemoglobin by the hemoglobin-haptoglobin receptor CD163 leads to a distinct alternative non–foam cell antiinflammatory macrophage phenotype that was previously considered atheroprotective. Here, we reveal an unexpected but important pathogenic role for these macrophages in atherosclerosis. Using human atherosclerotic samples, cultured cells, and a mouse model of advanced atherosclerosis, we investigated the role of intraplaque hemorrhage on macrophage function with respect to angiogenesis, vascular permeability, inflammation, and plaque progression. In human atherosclerotic lesions, CD163+ macrophages were ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Liang Guo, Hirokuni Akahori, Emanuel Harari, Samantha L. Smith, Rohini Polavarapu, Vinit Karmali, Fumiyuki Otsuka, Rachel L. Gannon, Ryan E. Braumann, Megan H. Dickinson, Anuj Gupta, Audrey L. Jenkins, Michael J. Lipinski, Johoon Kim, Peter Chhour, Paul S Source Type: research

A common variant alters SCN5A–miR-24 interaction and associates with heart failure mortality
SCN5A encodes the voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.5 that is responsible for depolarization of the cardiac action potential and rapid intercellular conduction. Mutations disrupting the SCN5A coding sequence cause inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathy, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to SCN5A splicing, localization, and function associate with heart failure–related sudden cardiac death. However, the clinical relevance of SNPs that modulate SCN5A expression levels remains understudied. We recently generated a transcriptome-wide map of microRNA (miR) binding sites in human heart, evaluated their overl...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Xiaoming Zhang, Jin-Young Yoon, Michael Morley, Jared M. McLendon, Kranti A. Mapuskar, Rebecca Gutmann, Haider Mehdi, Heather L. Bloom, Samuel C. Dudley, Patrick T. Ellinor, Alaa A. Shalaby, Raul Weiss, W.H. Wilson Tang, Christine S. Moravec, Madhurmeet S Source Type: research

SCN5A: the greatest HITS collection
Heart failure (HF) has been referred to as the cardiovascular epidemic of our time. Understanding the molecular determinants of HF disease progression and mortality risk is of utmost importance. In this issue of the JCI, Zhang et al. uncover an important link between clinical HF mortality risk and a common variant that regulates SCN5A expression through microRNA-dependent (miR-dependent)mechanisms. They also demonstrate that haploinsufficiency of SCN5A is associated with increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a genetically engineered murine model. Their data suggest that even modest depression of SCN5A ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: David S. Park, Glenn I. Fishman Source Type: research

Alternative macrophages in atherosclerosis: not always protective!
This study thus identifies proatherogenic properties of CD163+ macrophages, which previously were thought to be beneficial. (Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation)
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Benoit Pourcet, Bart Staels Source Type: research

Intracellular lipid metabolism impairs β cell compensation during diet-induced obesity
The compensatory proliferation of insulin-producing β cells is critical to maintaining glucose homeostasis at the early stage of type 2 diabetes. Failure of β cells to proliferate results in hyperglycemia and insulin dependence in patients. To understand the effect of the interplay between β cell compensation and lipid metabolism upon obesity and peripheral insulin resistance, we eliminated LDL receptor–related protein 1 (LRP1), a pleiotropic mediator of cholesterol, insulin, energy metabolism, and other cellular processes, in β cells. Upon high-fat diet exposure, LRP1 ablation significantly impai...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Risheng Ye, Ruth Gordillo, Mengle Shao, Toshiharu Onodera, Zhe Chen, Shiuhwei Chen, Xiaoli Lin, Jeffrey A. SoRelle, Xiaohong Li, Miao Tang, Mark P. Keller, Regina Kuliawat, Alan D. Attie, Rana K. Gupta, William L. Holland, Bruce Beutler, Joachim Herz, Phi Source Type: research

TIA1 variant drives myodegeneration in multisystem proteinopathy with SQSTM1 mutations
Multisystem proteinopathy (MSP) involves disturbances of stress granule (SG) dynamics and autophagic protein degradation that underlie the pathogenesis of a spectrum of degenerative diseases that affect muscle, brain, and bone. Specifically, identical mutations in the autophagic adaptor SQSTM1 can cause varied penetrance of 4 distinct phenotypes: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia, Paget’s disease of the bone, and distal myopathy. It has been hypothesized that clinical pleiotropy relates to additional genetic determinants, but thus far, evidence has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence th...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: YouJin Lee, Per Harald Jonson, Jaakko Sarparanta, Johanna Palmio, Mohona Sarkar, Anna Vihola, Anni Evilä, Tiina Suominen, Sini Penttilä, Marco Savarese, Mridul Johari, Marie-Christine Minot, David Hilton-Jones, Paul Maddison, Patrick Chinnery, Jens Reim Source Type: research

HIV latency is reversed by ACSS2-driven histone crotonylation
We report that a previously unrecognized epigenetic modification of the HIV LTR, histone crotonylation, is a regulator of HIV latency. Reactivation of latent HIV was achieved following the induction of histone crotonylation through increased expression of the crotonyl-CoA–producing enzyme acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (ACSS2). This reprogrammed the local chromatin at the HIV LTR through increased histone acetylation and reduced histone methylation. Pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA knockdown of ACSS2 diminished histone crotonylation–induced HIV replication and reactivation. ACSS2 induction was...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Guochun Jiang, Don Nguyen, Nancie M. Archin, Steven A. Yukl, Gema Méndez-Lagares, Yuyang Tang, Maher M. Elsheikh, George R. Thompson III, Dennis J. Hartigan-O’Connor, David M. Margolis, Joseph K. Wong, Satya Dandekar Source Type: research

Cellular senescence in brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases: evidence and perspectives
Along with a general decline in overall health, most chronic degenerative human diseases are inherently associated with increasing age. Age-associated cognitive impairments and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, are potentially debilitating conditions that lack viable options for treatment, resulting in a tremendous economic and societal cost. Most high-profile clinical trials for neurodegenerative diseases have led to inefficacious results, suggesting that novel approaches to treating these pathologies are needed. Numerous recent studies have demonstrated that senescent c...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Darren J. Baker, Ronald C. Petersen Source Type: research

Hypothalamic ER–associated degradation regulates POMC maturation, feeding, and age-associated obesity
Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons function as key regulators of metabolism and physiology by releasing prohormone-derived neuropeptides with distinct biological activities. However, our understanding of early events in prohormone maturation in the ER remains incomplete. Highlighting the significance of this gap in knowledge, a single POMC cysteine-to-phenylalanine mutation at position 28 (POMC-C28F) is defective for ER processing and causes early onset obesity in a dominant-negative manner in humans through an unclear mechanism. Here, we report a pathologically important role of Sel1L-Hrd1, the protein complex of ER-asso...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 20, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Geun Hyang Kim, Guojun Shi, Diane R.M. Somlo, Leena Haataja, Soobin Song, Qiaoming Long, Eduardo A. Nillni, Malcolm J. Low, Peter Arvan, Martin G. Myers Jr., Ling Qi Source Type: research

Vhl deletion in osteoblasts boosts cellular glycolysis and improves global glucose metabolism
The skeleton has emerged as an important regulator of systemic glucose homeostasis, with osteocalcin and insulin representing prime mediators of the interplay between bone and energy metabolism. However, genetic evidence indicates that osteoblasts can influence global energy metabolism through additional, as yet unknown, mechanisms. Here, we report that constitutive or postnatally induced deletion of the hypoxia signaling pathway component von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) in skeletal osteolineage cells of mice led to high bone mass as well as hypoglycemia and increased glucose tolerance, not accounted for by osteocalcin or in...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 12, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Naomi Dirckx, Robert J. Tower, Evi M. Mercken, Roman Vangoitsenhoven, Caroline Moreau-Triby, Tom Breugelmans, Elena Nefyodova, Ruben Cardoen, Chantal Mathieu, Bart Van der Schueren, Cyrille B. Confavreux, Thomas L. Clemens, Christa Maes Source Type: research

Disruption of staphylococcal aggregation protects against lethal lung injury
Infection by Staphylococcus aureus strain USA300 causes tissue injury, multiorgan failure, and high mortality. However, the mechanisms by which the bacteria adhere to, then stabilize on, mucosal surfaces before causing injury remain unclear. We addressed these issues through the first real-time determinations of USA300-alveolar interactions in live lungs. We found that within minutes, inhaled USA300 established stable, self-associated microaggregates in niches at curved, but not at flat, regions of the alveolar wall. The microaggregates released α-hemolysin toxin, causing localized alveolar injury, as indicated by ep...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 12, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Jaime L. Hook, Mohammad N. Islam, Dane Parker, Alice S. Prince, Sunita Bhattacharya, Jahar Bhattacharya Source Type: research

Severe peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction is common in Dravet syndrome
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. Patients with DS have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), widely believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that patients with DS commonly have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation during video EEG monitoring and died later of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss-of-function mutation were monitored and died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 12, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: YuJaung Kim, Eduardo Bravo, Caitlin K. Thirnbeck, Lori A. Smith-Mellecker, Se Hee Kim, Brian K. Gehlbach, Linda C. Laux, Xiuqiong Zhou, Douglas R. Nordli Jr., George B. Richerson Source Type: research

Cardiovascular outcome trials of diabetes drugs: lessons learned
(Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation)
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 12, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Simeon I. Taylor, Bruce R. Leslie Source Type: research

STAT3/p53 pathway activation disrupts IFN-β–induced dormancy in tumor-repopulating cells
Dynamic interaction with the immune system profoundly regulates tumor cell dormancy. However, it is unclear how immunological cues trigger cancer cell–intrinsic signaling pathways for entering into dormancy. Here, we show that IFN-β treatment induced tumor-repopulating cells (TRC) to enter dormancy through an indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase/kynurenine/aryl hydrocarbon receptor/p27–dependent (IDO/Kyn/AhR/p27-dependent) pathway. Strategies to block this metabolic circuitry did not relieve dormancy, but led to apoptosis of dormant TRCs in murine and human melanoma models. Specifically, blocking AhR redirected IFN-...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 12, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Yuying Liu, Jiadi Lv, Jinyan Liu, Xiaoyu Liang, Xun Jin, Jing Xie, Le Zhang, Degao Chen, Roland Fiskesund, Ke Tang, Jingwei Ma, Huafeng Zhang, Wenqian Dong, Siqi Mo, Tianzhen Zhang, Feiran Cheng, Yabo Zhou, Qingzhu Jia, Bo Zhu, Yan Kong, Jun Guo, Haizeng Source Type: research

Physiological genomics identifies genetic modifiers of long QT syndrome type 2 severity
Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited channelopathy associated with life-threatening arrhythmias. LQTS type 2 (LQT2) is caused by mutations in KCNH2, which encodes the potassium channel hERG. We hypothesized that modifier genes are partly responsible for the variable phenotype severity observed in some LQT2 families. Here, we identified contributors to variable expressivity in an LQT2 family by using induced pluripotent stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) and whole exome sequencing in a synergistic manner. We found that iPSC-CMs recapitulated the clinical genotype-phenotype discordance in vitro. ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 12, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Sam Chai, Xiaoping Wan, Angelina Ramirez-Navarro, Paul J. Tesar, Elizabeth S. Kaufman, Eckhard Ficker, Alfred L. George Jr., Isabelle Deschênes Source Type: research

Clonally expanded γδ T cells protect against Staphylococcus aureus skin reinfection
The mechanisms that mediate durable protection against Staphylococcus aureus skin reinfections are unclear, as recurrences are common despite high antibody titers and memory T cells. Here, we developed a mouse model of S. aureus skin reinfection to investigate protective memory responses. In contrast with WT mice, IL-1β–deficient mice exhibited poor neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance during primary infection that was rescued during secondary S. aureus challenge. The γδ T cells from skin-draining LNs utilized compensatory T cell–intrinsic TLR2/MyD88 signaling to mediate rescue by tra...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Carly A. Dillen, Bret L. Pinsker, Alina I. Marusina, Alexander A. Merleev, Orly N. Farber, Haiyun Liu, Nathan K. Archer, Da B. Lee, Yu Wang, Roger V. Ortines, Steven K. Lee, Mark C. Marchitto, Shuting S. Cai, Alyssa G. Ashbaugh, Larissa S. May, Steven M. Source Type: research

Randomized, controlled trial of TNF-α antagonist in CTL-mediated severe cutaneous adverse reactions
BACKGROUND. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte–mediated (CTL-mediated) severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), are rare but life-threatening adverse reactions commonly induced by drugs. Although high levels of CTL-associated cytokines, chemokines, or cytotoxic proteins, including TNF-α and granulysin, were observed in SJS-TEN patients in recent studies, the optimal treatment for these diseases remains controversial. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic mechanism of a TNF-α antagonist in CTL-mediated SCARs. METHODS...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chuang-Wei Wang, Lan-Yan Yang, Chun-Bing Chen, Hsin-Chun Ho, Shuen-Iu Hung, Chih-Hsun Yang, Chee-Jen Chang, Shih-Chi Su, Rosaline Chung-Yee Hui, See-Wen Chin, Li-Fang Huang, Yang Yu-Wei Lin, Wei-Yang Chang, Wen-Lang Fan, Chin-Yi Yang, Ji-Chen Ho, Ya-Ching Source Type: research

A tribute to Terry Strom
(Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation)
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Laurence A. Turka, Manikka Suthanthiran Source Type: research

Claudin-18–mediated YAP activity regulates lung stem and progenitor cell homeostasis and tumorigenesis
Claudins, the integral tight junction (TJ) proteins that regulate paracellular permeability and cell polarity, are frequently dysregulated in cancer; however, their role in neoplastic progression is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that knockout of Cldn18, a claudin family member highly expressed in lung alveolar epithelium, leads to lung enlargement, parenchymal expansion, increased abundance and proliferation of known distal lung progenitors, the alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cells, activation of Yes-associated protein (YAP), increased organ size, and tumorigenesis in mice. Inhibition of YAP decreased proliferation and...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Beiyun Zhou, Per Flodby, Jiao Luo, Dan R. Castillo, Yixin Liu, Fa-Xing Yu, Alicia McConnell, Bino Varghese, Guanglei Li, Nyam-Osor Chimge, Mitsuhiro Sunohara, Michael N. Koss, Wafaa Elatre, Peter Conti, Janice M. Liebler, Chenchen Yang, Crystal N. Marcone Source Type: research

All plugged up — noninvasive mucus score to assess airway dysfunction in asthma
Asthma is remarkably heterogeneous, and there are multiple underlying inflammatory pathways and structural airway abnormalities that lead to symptomatic disease. Consequently, a current challenge in the field is to precisely characterize different types of asthma, with the goal of developing personalized approaches to therapy. In the current issue of the JCI, Dunican et al. developed a noninvasive way to assess airway dysfunction in asthma by measuring mucus accumulation using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and found that mucus plugging of small airways was remarkably common in subjects with severe asthma. This w...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Steve N. Georas Source Type: research

Mucus plugs in patients with asthma linked to eosinophilia and airflow obstruction
BACKGROUND. The link between mucus plugs and airflow obstruction has not been established in chronic severe asthma, and the role of eosinophils and their products in mucus plug formation is unknown. METHODS. In clinical studies, we developed and applied a bronchopulmonary segment–based scoring system to quantify mucus plugs on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) lung scans from 146 subjects with asthma and 22 controls, and analyzed relationships among mucus plug scores, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and airway eosinophils. Additionally, we used airway mucus gel models to explore whether oxidants g...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Eleanor M. Dunican, Brett M. Elicker, David S. Gierada, Scott K. Nagle, Mark L. Schiebler, John D. Newell, Wilfred W. Raymond, Marrah E. Lachowicz-Scroggins, Selena Di Maio, Eric A. Hoffman, Mario Castro, Sean B. Fain, Nizar N. Jarjour, Elliot Israel, Bru Source Type: research

Hippo-mediated suppression of IRS2/AKT signaling prevents hepatic steatosis and liver cancer
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major risk factor for liver cancer; therefore, its prevention is an important clinical goal. Ablation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) or the protein kinase Hippo signaling pathway induces liver cancer via activation of AKT or the transcriptional regulators YAP/TAZ, respectively; however, the potential for crosstalk between the PTEN/AKT and Hippo/YAP/TAZ pathways in liver tumorigenesis has thus far remained unclear. Here, we have shown that deletion of both PTEN and SAV1 in the liver accelerates the development of NAFLD and liver cancer in mice. At the molecular level, ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Sun-Hye Jeong, Han-Byul Kim, Min-Chul Kim, Ji-min Lee, Jae Ho Lee, Jeong-Hwan Kim, Jin-Woo Kim, Woong-Yang Park, Seon-Young Kim, Jae Bum Kim, Haeryoung Kim, Jin-Man Kim, Hueng-Sik Choi, Dae-Sik Lim Source Type: research

Claudin-18: unexpected regulator of lung alveolar epithelial cell proliferation
Claudin 18 (CLDN18) is a tight junction protein that is highly expressed in the lung. While mice lacking CLDN18 exhibit the expected loss of epithelial integrity in the lung, these animals also have unexpectedly large lungs. In this issue of the JCI, Zhou, Flodby, and colleagues reveal that the increased lung size of Cldn18–/– mice is the result of increased type 2 alveolar epithelial (AT2) cell proliferation. This increase in proliferation was shown to be driven by translocation of the transcriptional regulator Yes-associated protein (YAP) to the nucleus and subsequent induction of proliferative pathways. CLDN...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Darrell N. Kotton Source Type: research

Blood will out: vascular contributions to Alzheimer’s disease
The fundamental pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is neuronal dysfunction leading to cognitive impairment. The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), derived from amyloid precursor protein, is one driver of AD, but how it leads to neuronal dysfunction is not established. In this Review, I discuss the complexity of AD and possible cause-and-effect relationships between Aβ and the vascular and hemostatic systems. AD can be considered a multifactorial syndrome with various contributing pathological mechanisms. Therefore, as is routinely done with cancer, it will be important to classify patients with respect to thei...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 2, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Sidney Strickland Source Type: research

Dinaciclib induces immunogenic cell death and enhances anti-PD1–mediated tumor suppression
Blockade of the checkpoint inhibitor programmed death 1 (PD1) has demonstrated remarkable success in the clinic for the treatment of cancer; however, a majority of tumors are resistant to anti-PD1 monotherapy. Numerous ongoing clinical combination therapy studies will likely reveal additional therapeutics that complement anti-PD1 blockade. Recent studies found that immunogenic cell death (ICD) improves T cell responses against different tumors, thus indicating that ICD may further augment antitumor immunity elicited by anti-PD1. Here, we observed antitumor activity following combinatorial therapy with anti-PD1 Ab and the c...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 2, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Dewan Md Sakib Hossain, Sarah Javaid, Mingmei Cai, Chunsheng Zhang, Anandi Sawant, Marlene Hinton, Manjiri Sathe, Jeff Grein, Wendy Blumenschein, Elaine M. Pinheiro, Alissa Chackerian Source Type: research

Fructose metabolism and metabolic disease
Increased sugar consumption is increasingly considered to be a contributor to the worldwide epidemics of obesity and diabetes and their associated cardiometabolic risks. As a result of its unique metabolic properties, the fructose component of sugar may be particularly harmful. Diets high in fructose can rapidly produce all of the key features of the metabolic syndrome. Here we review the biology of fructose metabolism as well as potential mechanisms by which excessive fructose consumption may contribute to cardiometabolic disease. (Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation)
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - February 2, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Sarah A. Hannou, Danielle E. Haslam, Nicola M. McKeown, Mark A. Herman Source Type: research

Factor XII and uPAR upregulate neutrophil functions to influence wound healing
Coagulation factor XII (FXII) deficiency is associated with decreased neutrophil migration, but the mechanisms remain uncharacterized. Here, we examine how FXII contributes to the inflammatory response. In 2 models of sterile inflammation, FXII-deficient mice (F12–/–) had fewer neutrophils recruited than WT mice. We discovered that neutrophils produced a pool of FXII that is functionally distinct from hepatic-derived FXII and contributes to neutrophil trafficking at sites of inflammation. FXII signals in neutrophils through urokinase plasminogen activator receptor–mediated (uPAR-mediated) Akt2 phosphoryla...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 30, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Evi X. Stavrou, Chao Fang, Kara L. Bane, Andy T. Long, Clément Naudin, Erdem Kucukal, Agharnan Gandhi, Adina Brett-Morris, Michele M. Mumaw, Sudeh Izadmehr, Alona Merkulova, Cindy C. Reynolds, Omar Alhalabi, Lalitha Nayak, Wen-Mei Yu, Cheng-Kui Qu, Howar Source Type: research

Hypothalamic loss of Snord116 and Prader-Willi syndrome hyperphagia: the buck stops here?
Hyperphagia and obesity are the best-known manifestations of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and are responsible for most of the overall morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Yet these PWS symptoms remain poorly understood and without effective pharmacologic therapies. Mouse models attempting to recapitulate both the genetic alterations and marked hyperphagia plus obesity of PWS have been enigmatic, leading to skepticism about the use of mouse models to investigate PWS. In this issue of the JCI, Polex-Wolf and colleagues challenge the skeptics by successfully inducing hyperphagia following bilateral mediobasal h...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 30, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Juan A. Rodriguez, Jeffrey M. Zigman Source Type: research

Newly found arsons ignite the fire of gut GVHD
Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the gut is common following hematopoetic cell transplantation (HCT) and is associated with high mortality. However, it remains unclear whether Th1 or Th17 CD4+ T cells can initiate acute gut GVHD. In this issue of the JCI, Ullrich and colleagues identified a subset of CD4+ T cells that express high levels of IL-7Rα and granulocyte-macrophage CSF (IL-7RαhiGM-CSF+) cells that are involved in the induction of acute gut GVHD in murine models. The IL-7RαhiGM-CSF+ effector memory cells were BATF dependent, RORγt independent, produced large amounts of GM-CSF and IF...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 30, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Defu Zeng Source Type: research

BATF-dependent IL-7RhiGM-CSF+ T cells control intestinal graft-versus-host disease
Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) represents a severe, T cell–driven inflammatory complication following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). GVHD often affects the intestine and is associated with a poor prognosis. Although frequently detectable, proinflammatory mechanisms exerted by intestinal tissue–infiltrating Th cell subsets remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that the Th17-defining transcription factor basic leucine zipper transcription factor ATF-like (BATF) was strongly regulated across human and mouse intestinal GVHD tissues. Studies in complete MHC-mismatched and mi...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 30, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Evelyn Ullrich, Benjamin Abendroth, Johanna Rothamer, Carina Huber, Maike Büttner-Herold, Vera Buchele, Tina Vogler, Thomas Longerich, Sebastian Zundler, Simon Völkl, Andreas Beilhack, Stefan Rose-John, Stefan Wirtz, Georg F. Weber, Sakhila Ghimire, Mar Source Type: research

Microglia are required for protection against lethal coronavirus encephalitis in mice
Recent findings have highlighted the role of microglia in orchestrating normal development and refining neural network connectivity in the healthy CNS. Microglia are not only vital cells in maintaining CNS homeostasis, but also respond to injury, infection, and disease by undergoing proliferation and changes in transcription and morphology. A better understanding of the specific role of microglia in responding to viral infection is complicated by the presence of nonmicroglial myeloid cells with potentially overlapping function in the healthy brain and by the rapid infiltration of hematopoietic myeloid cells into the brain ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 30, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: D. Lori Wheeler, Alan Sariol, David K. Meyerholz, Stanley Perlman Source Type: research

Hypothalamic loss of Snord116 recapitulates the hyperphagia of Prader-Willi syndrome
In conclusion, we show that selective disruption of Snord116 expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus models the hyperphagia of PWS. (Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation)
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 30, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Joseph Polex-Wolf, Brian Y.H. Lam, Rachel Larder, John Tadross, Debra Rimmington, Fàtima Bosch, Verónica Jiménez Cenzano, Eduard Ayuso, Marcella K.L. Ma, Kara Rainbow, Anthony P. Coll, Stephen O’Rahilly, Giles S.H. Yeo Source Type: research

Endothelial Tie1–mediated angiogenesis and vascular abnormalization promote tumor progression and metastasis
The endothelial tyrosine kinase receptor Tie1 remains poorly characterized, largely owing to its orphan receptor status. Global Tie1 inactivation causes late embryonic lethality, thereby reflecting its importance during development. Tie1 also plays pivotal roles during pathologies such as atherosclerosis and tumorigenesis. In order to study the contribution of Tie1 to tumor progression and metastasis, we conditionally deleted Tie1 in endothelial cells at different stages of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Tie1 deletion during primary tumor growth in mice led to a decrease in microvessel density and an increase i...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 23, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Silvia La Porta, Lise Roth, Mahak Singhal, Carolin Mogler, Carleen Spegg, Benjamin Schieb, Xianghu Qu, Ralf H. Adams, H. Scott Baldwin, Soniya Savant, Hellmut G. Augustin Source Type: research

Latent HIV reservoirs exhibit inherent resistance to elimination by CD8+ T cells
The presence of persistent, latent HIV reservoirs in CD4+ T cells obstructs current efforts to cure infection. The so-called kick-and-kill paradigm proposes to purge these reservoirs by combining latency-reversing agents with immune effectors such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Support for this approach is largely based on success in latency models, which do not fully reflect the makeup of latent reservoirs in individuals on long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent studies have shown that CD8+ T cells have the potential to recognize defective proviruses, which comprise the vast majority of all infected cells, and that t...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 23, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Szu-Han Huang, Yanqin Ren, Allison S. Thomas, Dora Chan, Stefanie Mueller, Adam R. Ward, Shabnum Patel, Catherine M. Bollard, Conrad Russell Cruz, Sara Karandish, Ronald Truong, Amanda B. Macedo, Alberto Bosque, Colin Kovacs, Erika Benko, Alicja Piechocka Source Type: research

Aberrant TGF-β activation in bone tendon insertion induces enthesopathy-like disease
Enthesopathy is a disorder of bone, tendon, or ligament insertion. It represents one-fourth of all tendon-ligament diseases and is one of the most difficult tendon-ligament disorders to treat. Despite its high prevalence, the exact pathogenesis of this condition remains unknown. Here, we show that TGF-β was activated in both a semi-Achilles tendon transection (SMTS) mouse model and in a dorsiflexion immobilization (DI) mouse model of enthesopathy. High concentrations of active TGF-β recruited mesenchymal stromal stem cells (MSCs) and led to excessive vessel formation, bone deterioration, and fibrocartilage calcif...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 23, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Xiao Wang, Liang Xie, Janet Crane, Gehua Zhen, Fengfeng Li, Ping Yang, Manman Gao, Ruoxian Deng, Yiguo Wang, Xiaohua Jia, Cunyi Fan, Mei Wan, Xu Cao Source Type: research

JAK2/IDH-mutant–driven myeloproliferative neoplasm is sensitive to combined targeted inhibition
Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) frequently progress to bone marrow failure or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and mutations in epigenetic regulators such as the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) are associated with poor outcomes. Here, we showed that combined expression of Jak2V617F and mutant IDH1R132H or Idh2R140Q induces MPN progression, alters stem/progenitor cell function, and impairs differentiation in mice. Jak2V617F Idh2R140Q–mutant MPNs were sensitive to small-molecule inhibition of IDH. Combined inhibition of JAK2 and IDH2 normalized the stem and progenitor cell compartments in...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 23, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Anna Sophia McKenney, Allison N. Lau, Amritha Varshini Hanasoge Somasundara, Barbara Spitzer, Andrew M. Intlekofer, Jihae Ahn, Kaitlyn Shank, Franck T. Rapaport, Minal A. Patel, Efthymia Papalexi, Alan H. Shih, April Chiu, Elizaveta Freinkman, Esra A. Akb Source Type: research

Long noncoding RNA BLACAT2 promotes bladder cancer–associated lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis
The prognosis for bladder cancer patients with lymph node (LN) metastasis is dismal and only minimally improved by current treatment modalities. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie LN metastasis may provide clinical therapeutic strategies for LN-metastatic bladder cancer. Here, we report that a long noncoding RNA LINC00958, which we have termed bladder cancer–associated transcript 2 (BLACAT2), was markedly upregulated in LN-metastatic bladder cancer and correlated with LN metastasis. Overexpression of BLACAT2 promoted bladder cancer–associated lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis in both...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 23, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wang He, Guangzheng Zhong, Ning Jiang, Bo Wang, Xinxiang Fan, Changhao Chen, Xu Chen, Jian Huang, Tianxin Lin Source Type: research

Dinaciclib induces immunogenic cell death and enhances anti–PD-1–mediated tumor suppression
Blockade of the checkpoint inhibitor programmed death 1 (PD1) has demonstrated remarkable success in the clinic for the treatment of cancer; however, a majority of tumors are resistant to anti-PD1 monotherapy. Numerous ongoing clinical combination therapy studies will likely reveal additional therapeutics that complement anti-PD1 blockade. Recent studies found that immunogenic cell death (ICD) improves T cell responses against different tumors, thus indicating that ICD may further augment antitumor immunity elicited by anti-PD1. Here, we observed antitumor activity following combinatorial therapy with anti-PD1 Ab and the c...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Dewan Md Sakib Hossain, Sarah Javaid, Mingmei Cai, Chunsheng Zhang, Anandi Sawant, Marlene Hinton, Manjiri Sathe, Jeff Grein, Wendy Blumenschein, Elaine M. Pinheiro, Alissa Chackerian Source Type: research

OATP1B2 deficiency protects against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity
Paclitaxel is among the most widely used anticancer drugs and is known to cause a dose-limiting peripheral neurotoxicity, the initiating mechanisms of which remain unknown. Here, we identified the murine solute carrier organic anion–transporting polypeptide B2 (OATP1B2) as a mediator of paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, using established tests to assess acute and chronic paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity, we found that genetic or pharmacologic knockout of OATP1B2 protected mice from mechanically induced allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and changes in digital maximal action potential amplitudes. The funct...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Alix F. Leblanc, Jason A. Sprowl, Paola Alberti, Alessia Chiorazzi, W. David Arnold, Alice A. Gibson, Kristen W. Hong, Marissa S. Pioso, Mingqing Chen, Kevin M. Huang, Vamsi Chodisetty, Olivia Costa, Tatiana Florea, Peter de Bruijn, Ron H. Mathijssen, Raq Source Type: research

Role for VGLUT2 in selective vulnerability of midbrain dopamine neurons
Parkinson’s disease is characterized by the loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area are more resistant to this degeneration than those in the SNc, though the mechanisms for selective resistance or vulnerability remain poorly understood. A key to elucidating these processes may lie within the subset of DA neurons that corelease glutamate and express the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT2. Here, we addressed the potential relationship between VGLUT expression and DA neuronal vulnerability by overexpressing VGLUT in DA neurons of flies and m...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Thomas Steinkellner, Vivien Zell, Zachary J. Farino, Mark S. Sonders, Michael Villeneuve, Robin J. Freyberg, Serge Przedborski, Wei Lu, Zachary Freyberg, Thomas S. Hnasko Source Type: research

RAGE binds preamyloid IAPP intermediates and mediates pancreatic β cell proteotoxicity
Islet amyloidosis is characterized by the aberrant accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) in pancreatic islets, resulting in β cell toxicity, which exacerbates type 2 diabetes and islet transplant failure. It is not fully clear how IAPP induces cellular stress or how IAPP-induced toxicity can be prevented or treated. We recently defined the properties of toxic IAPP species. Here, we have identified a receptor-mediated mechanism of islet amyloidosis–induced proteotoxicity. In human diabetic pancreas and in cellular and mouse models of islet amyloidosis, increased expression of the receptor for advanced ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Andisheh Abedini, Ping Cao, Annette Plesner, Jinghua Zhang, Meilun He, Julia Derk, Sachi A. Patil, Rosa Rosario, Jacqueline Lonier, Fei Song, Hyunwook Koh, Huilin Li, Daniel P. Raleigh, Ann Marie Schmidt Source Type: research

A double negative: inhibition of hepatic Gi signaling improves glucose homeostasis
Hepatic glucose production (HGP) is a key determinant of glucose homeostasis. Glucagon binding to its cognate seven-transmembrane Gs-coupled receptor in hepatocytes stimulates cAMP production, resulting in increased HGP. In this issue of the JCI, Rossi and colleagues tested the hypothesis that activation of hepatic Gi–coupled receptors, which should inhibit cAMP production, would oppose the cAMP-inducing action of glucagon and thereby decrease HGP. Surprisingly, however, the opposite occurred: activation of Gi signaling increased HGP via a novel mechanism, while inhibition of Gi signaling reduced HGP. These results d...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Allen M. Spiegel Source Type: research

Zinc transporter Slc39a8 is essential for cardiac ventricular compaction
Isolated left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) results from excessive trabeculation and impaired myocardial compaction during heart development. The extracellular matrix (ECM) that separates endocardium from myocardium plays a critical but poorly understood role in ventricular trabeculation and compaction. In an attempt to characterize solute carrier family 39 member 8–null (Slc39a8-null) mice, we discovered that homozygous null embryos do not survive embryogenesis, and exhibit a cardiac phenotype similar to human LVNC. Slc39a8 encodes a divalent metal cation importer that has been implicated in ECM degradation throu...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wen Lin, Deqiang Li, Lan Cheng, Li Li, Feiyan Liu, Nicholas J. Hand, Jonathan A. Epstein, Daniel J. Rader Source Type: research

Host expression of PD-L1 determines efficacy of PD-L1 pathway blockade–mediated tumor regression
Programmed death-1 receptor (PD-L1, B7-H1) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) pathway blockade is a promising therapy for treating cancer. However, the mechanistic contribution of host and tumor PD-L1 and PD-1 signaling to the therapeutic efficacy of PD-L1 and PD-1 blockade remains elusive. Here, we evaluated 3 tumor-bearing mouse models that differ in their sensitivity to PD-L1 blockade and demonstrated a loss of therapeutic efficacy of PD-L1 blockade in immunodeficient mice and in PD-L1– and PD-1–deficient mice. In contrast, neither knockout nor overexpression of PD-L1 in tumor cells had an effect on ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Heng Lin, Shuang Wei, Elaine M. Hurt, Michael D. Green, Lili Zhao, Linda Vatan, Wojciech Szeliga, Ronald Herbst, Paul W. Harms, Leslie A. Fecher, Pankaj Vats, Arul M. Chinnaiyan, Christopher D. Lao, Theodore S. Lawrence, Max Wicha, Junzo Hamanishi, Masaki Source Type: research

The host protecting the tumor from the host — targeting PD‑L1 expressed by host cells
Tumors frequently escape from immune surveillance by hijacking the natural control mechanisms that regulate normal immune responses. The programmed death-1 receptor (PD‑1) on T cells normally helps limit excessive immune activation, but it can also suppress beneficial antitumor immunity. In the clinic, blocking either PD‑1 or one of its principal counterligands, programmed death–ligand 1 (PD‑L1), can lead to dramatic responses in certain patients. Because PD‑L1 can be expressed by both the tumor cells themselves and also the host cells, including host immune cells, the actual mechanistic target of therapy has...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: David H. Munn Source Type: research

PD-L1 on host cells is essential for PD-L1 blockade–mediated tumor regression
Programmed death–ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression on tumor cells is essential for T cell impairment, and PD-L1 blockade therapy has shown unprecedented durable responses in several clinical studies. Although higher expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells is associated with a better immune response after Ab blockade, some PD-L1–negative patients also respond to this therapy. In the current study, we explored whether PD-L1 on tumor or host cells was essential for anti–PD-L1–mediated therapy in 2 different murine tumor models. Using real-time imaging in whole tumor tissues, we found that anti–PD-L1 Ab accu...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Haidong Tang, Yong Liang, Robert A. Anders, Janis M. Taube, Xiangyan Qiu, Aditi Mulgaonkar, Xin Liu, Susan M. Harrington, Jingya Guo, Yangchun Xin, Yahong Xiong, Kien Nham, William Silvers, Guiyang Hao, Xiankai Sun, Mingyi Chen, Raquibul Hannan, Jian Qiao Source Type: research

Critical roles of αII spectrin in brain development and epileptic encephalopathy
The nonerythrocytic α-spectrin-1 (SPTAN1) gene encodes the cytoskeletal protein αII spectrin. Mutations in SPTAN1 cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy type 5 (EIEE5); however, the role of αII spectrin in neurodevelopment and EIEE5 pathogenesis is unknown. Prior work suggests that αII spectrin is absent in the axon initial segment (AIS) and contributes to a diffusion barrier in the distal axon. Here, we have shown that αII spectrin is expressed ubiquitously in rodent and human somatodendritic and axonal domains. CRISPR-mediated deletion of Sptan1 in embryonic rat forebrain by in utero...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Yu Wang, Tuo Ji, Andrew D. Nelson, Katarzyna Glanowska, Geoffrey G. Murphy, Paul M. Jenkins, Jack M. Parent Source Type: research

Hepatic Gi signaling regulates whole-body glucose homeostasis
An increase in hepatic glucose production (HGP) is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Excessive signaling through hepatic Gs–linked glucagon receptors critically contributes to pathologically elevated HGP. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this metabolic impairment can be counteracted by enhancing hepatic Gi signaling. Specifically, we used a chemogenetic approach to selectively activate Gi-type G proteins in mouse hepatocytes in vivo. Unexpectedly, activation of hepatic Gi signaling triggered a pronounced increase in HGP and severely impaired glucose homeostasis. Moreover, increased Gi signaling stimulated glucose ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 17, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Mario Rossi, Lu Zhu, Sara M. McMillin, Sai Prasad Pydi, Shanu Jain, Lei Wang, Yinghong Cui, Regina J. Lee, Amanda H. Cohen, Hideaki Kaneto, Morris J. Birnbaum, Yanling Ma, Yaron Rotman, Jie Liu, Travis J. Cyphert, Toren Finkel, Owen P. McGuinness, Jürgen Source Type: research

Unravelling the fate of functional PD1+ T cells in chronic viral hepatitis
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can be managed clinically with nucleos(t)ide therapy, which suppresses viral replication; however, these drugs must often be used long term, as they are unable to fully eliminate the virus. For many patients, discontinuation of treatment results in viral resurgence and hepatic flare, and there is not a reliable way to identify those individuals that can be successfully taken off nucleos(t)ide therapy. In this issue of the JCI, Rivino and colleagues report on their use of a multipronged approach to investigate potential biomarkers indicative of HBV-infected patients who can safely stop nucl...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 9, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Eleanor Barnes Source Type: research

Insulin exits skeletal muscle capillaries by fluid-phase transport
Before insulin can stimulate myocytes to take up glucose, it must first move from the circulation to the interstitial space. The continuous endothelium of skeletal muscle (SkM) capillaries restricts insulin’s access to myocytes. The mechanism by which insulin crosses this continuous endothelium is critical to understand insulin action and insulin resistance; however, methodological obstacles have limited understanding of endothelial insulin transport in vivo. Here, we present an intravital microscopy technique to measure the rate of insulin efflux across the endothelium of SkM capillaries. This method involves develo...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - January 9, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Ian M. Williams, Francisco A. Valenzuela, Steven D. Kahl, Doraiswami Ramkrishna, Adam R. Mezo, Jamey D. Young, K. Sam Wells, David H. Wasserman Source Type: research