Service providers' perceptions of families caring for children with disabilities in resource ‐poor settings in South Africa
AbstractCaring for children with disabilities (CWD) is a challenging task for families and service providers alike. Even though previous research has explored experiences and perceptions of families who care for CWD, research focusing on service providers' perceptions of such families is limited. Through the lens of a care framework, the present study aims to explore service providers' perceptions of families caring for CWD in resource ‐poor settings in South Africa. Key informant interviews were conducted with managers of 10 organizations supported by the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund. An inductive thematic analysis wa...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - April 6, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Gadija Khan, Dane Isaacs, Mokhant šo Gladys Makoae, Lorenza Logan Fluks, Tholang Mokhele, Zitha Mokomane Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Setting the stage for family reunification
In this study, the authors analysed data from 27 interviews with parents whose children were removed by child welfare and four focus groups totalling 18 staff from a parent educat ion service provider. The data suggest that while these non‐profit programmes are designed to improve the parental behaviours that led to their child welfare system involvement, staff and parents also describe the programmes as helping them develop a specific performance of self (Goffman, 1956) wh en interacting with child welfare agencies. This performance ultimately facilitates their capacity to build an effective working relationship with th...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - April 6, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Elizabeth Harris, Miguel Becerra Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Issue Information ‐ TOC
No abstract is available for this article. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - April 1, 2020 Category: Child Development Tags: ISSUE INFORMATION ‐ TOC Source Type: research

Issue Information
No abstract is available for this article. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - April 1, 2020 Category: Child Development Tags: ISSUE INFORMATION Source Type: research

Aboriginal parents' experiences of having their children removed by statutory child protection services
AbstractThe number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in out ‐of‐home care has more than doubled in the past decade. Research into the experiences of parents who have had their children removed is an emerging area; though very few of these studies are specific to Indigenous children and families. This paper presents a participatory research study that exp lored the experiences of a group of Aboriginal Australian parents who have had their children removed by child protection authorities in one Australian state, New South Wales. This paper highlights the challenges for Indigenous families navigatin...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - April 1, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: BJ Newton Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Thrown back: Reintegration experiences of National Guard/Reserve mothers of young children
AbstractFew studies have examined the experiences and perceptions of servicewoman mothers and their children, even as an increasing number of them have experienced deployment and combat exposure. The present paper describes a qualitative study that explored National Guard/Reserve (NG/R) mothers' experiences with mothering and co ‐parenting during reintegration and their perceived priorities, supports, challenges and needs. Interpretive phenomenological analysis of seven in‐depth qualitative interviews produced themes including reunion and loneliness, the importance of time, help seeking and gendered experiences. Notabl...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 25, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Juliann H. Nicholson, Ellen R. DeVoe Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Knowledge exchange, foster care and early education: Introducing treasure baskets to foster carers of young children
AbstractAll children have a right to early childhood education, but preschool ‐aged fostered children are less likely than others to access formal early childhood education and care (ECEC) services such as nurseries and playgroups. The home learning environment is crucial for this group. Building on an earlier pilot study where foster carers of young children saw education as something that largely happens outside the home, this paper presents a knowledge exchange project that aimed to build foster carers' self‐concept as educators. The design of the project aimed to exchange knowledge between academic researchers and ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 25, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Claire Cameron, Veena Meetoo, Thure Johansen, Sonia Jackson Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Predictors of parenting stress in portuguese adolescents' adoptive parents
AbstractParenting stress is related to the characteristics of both the child and the parents, as well as to parent –child interactions. In adoptive families, parenting stress has been identified as an indicator of the family's adjustment to adoption. The stress experienced by parents of adopted adolescents deserves special consideration, as adolescence is a critical period in the adoptees' developmental pathwa y. The present study aims to identify the adoptee, parents and family related predictors of the adoptive parents' parenting stress, exploring direct and indirect effects. Fifty Portuguese adolescents' adoptive ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 17, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Isabel ‐Sofia Costa, Maria Barbosa‐Ducharne, Jesús Palacios, Joana Soares Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Psychotherapy for child welfare cases: Clinicians' and parents' perspectives
AbstractParents involved with child protective services (CPS) often face various challenges, including sociostructural marginalization, mental illness and difficulties in family relationships. Although their need for mental health services is generally acknowledged, the extant child welfare literature lacks studies on how CPS ‐involved parents may benefit from such services. In an attempt to address this gap, the current study seeks to explore clinicians' and parents' perspectives regarding the role of psychotherapy services (e.g. individual or conjoint counselling/therapy) for child welfare cases. Semi‐structured in t...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 17, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Hana Yoo, Stefana Racorean, Victoria Barrows Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Factors associated with the decision to investigate child protective services referrals: A systematic review
AbstractLimited resources for child protection create challenging decision situations for child protective services (CPS) workers at the point of intake. A body of research has examined the factors associated with worker decisions and processes using a variety of methodological approaches to gain knowledge on decision ‐making. However, few attempts have been made to systematically review this literature. As part of a larger project on decision‐making at intake, this systematic review addressed the question of the factors associated with worker decisions to investigate alleged maltreatment referrals. Quantitat ive studi...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 17, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Jeri L. Damman, Michelle Johnson ‐Motoyama, Susan J. Wells, Kelly Harrington Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Review of benefits and risks for children in open adoption arrangements
AbstractFollowing changes to our country's child protection legislation in 2015, adoptees in Spain have the possibility of post ‐adoption contact with their birth families. This review aims to provide social workers with a resource to guide their decision‐making by evaluating both the benefits and risks associated with open adoption. Of the 26 studies reviewed, 22 reported benefits and 8 discussed risks. Overall, contact with birth families is more commonly associated with positive than with negative outcomes for the adoptee, especially when the adoptive family is capable of communicative openness. The results support ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 13, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Megan Smith, Luc ía González‐Pasarín, María D. Salas, Isabel M. Bernedo Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Keeping children safe? Advancing social care assessments to address harmful sexual behaviour in schools
AbstractInternational evidence suggests that schools are locations where systems, practices, and cultures can enable harmful sexual behaviours. However, in England, welfare assessments primarily used by statutory social services largely target young people and their families, with limited capacity to assess environments beyond the home. Where young people display harmful sexual behaviours within educational settings, social care systems are yet to assess the factors within schools that may accelerate risks associated with harmful sexual behaviours. This exploratory article presents evidence on the opportunities for school ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 5, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Jenny Lloyd, Joanne Walker, Carlene Firmin Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Honneth and positive identity formation in residential care
AbstractNurturing, maintaining, and supporting positive identity formation for children and young people in residential child care are an underresearched area. Reasons for this are varied not least the fact that residential child care is still often not perceived as a positive choice for children and young people. Concerns about cost, value for money, the quality, and effectiveness of care have been exacerbated by findings from recent national and international government commissioned inquiries into allegations of historical abuse experienced by children and young people in residential child care. Their findings raise seri...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 2, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Gerry Marshall, Karen Winter, Danielle Turney Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Making sense of places: Belonging among “unaccompanied” young migrants in kinship care in a Swedish suburb
This study aims to explore how young migrants in kinship care in a Swedish suburb describe what different places mean to them and what these descriptions can tell us about their sense of belonging. In this study, semi ‐structured interviews with 11 young migrants between 16 and 21 years of age who took part in a mentoring programme are analysed by thematic analysis. Our analysis reveals that (a) the young people described four “levels” of place as meaningful in different ways—their kinship homes, the loca l community, the country they currently inhabit, and the world and that (b) it was through the inte...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 28, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Maria Moberg Stephenson, Åsa Källström Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

The role of family centres in reducing social isolation in deprived communities
AbstractSocial exclusion and isolation are worldwide social and health concerns with negative effects becoming exacerbated in deprived communities. There is limited understanding related to the role of community ‐based centres in reducing social exclusion and isolation, so the aim of this research was to explore the role one family centre had in improving social inclusion in a deprived community in Glasgow, Scotland. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was utilized to analyse interviews from 10 paren ts to explore their lived experiences of creating and developing social networks through family centre attendance. Fi...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 24, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Fiona Mercer, Chris Darbyshire, Janet Finlayson, Martin Kettle, Adele Dickson Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

The nature and culture of social work with children and families in long ‐term casework: Findings from a qualitative longitudinal study
AbstractSocial work in the United Kingdom is preoccupied with what social workers cannot do due to having limited time to spend with service users. Yet remarkably little research has examined what social workers actually do, especially in long ‐term relationships. This paper draws from an ethnographic study of two social work departments in England that spent 15 months observing practice and organizational life. Our findings show that social work some of the time has a significant amount of involvement with some service users and the do minant view that relationship‐based practice is rarely achieved is in need of some ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 14, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Harry Ferguson, Lisa Warwick, Tarsem Singh Cooner, Jadwiga Leigh, Liz Beddoe, Tom Disney, Gillian Plumridge Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

When standardization becomes the lens of professional practice in child welfare services
AbstractThis paper examines the relationship between professional work and standardization. There has been an increase in the use of standardized programmes in child welfare services (CWS) in Western society. Some researchers have criticized standardized programmes suggesting that they undermine professionals expertise and threaten their position, whereas others argue that such programmes strengthen professional practice. In this paper, we examine how standardized tools, in this case, a standardized parenting programme and a standardized Norwegian assessment tool, influence professional roles as experienced by child welfar...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 13, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Marina S. Sletten, Ingunn T. Ellingsen Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

More than therapy: The link between adverse childhood experiences, social support, and therapeutic services
AbstractAdverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a cumulative effect on physical, emotional, and social well ‐being throughout the life course. ACEs also impact parenting practices, which may contribute to intergenerational cycles of trauma. Access to child mental health services and caregiver social support are two protective factors that may reduce the burden of ACEs. To advance understanding of the re lationships between caregiver social support and child mental health services among caregivers with ACEs, we interviewed 13 caregivers of young children receiving outpatient mental health services. Thematic analysis rev...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 12, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Megan Ronnenberg, Aislinn Conrad, Armeda Stevenson Wojciak, Elizabeth Menninga Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Factors associated with provider self ‐efficacy in delivery of evidence‐based programs for children, youth, and families
AbstractInvestments in training real ‐world behavioral health providers in evidence‐based programs (EBPs) can be costly; thus, it is important to understand which providers may be more or less likely to implement such approaches after training. Provider self‐efficacy is associated with implementation of EBPs, but research on fact ors associated with provider self‐efficacy is less common. An exploratory, cross‐sectional, quantitative survey examined factors associated with provider self‐efficacy among 150 real‐world service providers who reported delivering EBPs to children, youth, or families in one U.S. stat...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 11, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Cheri J. Shapiro, Emilie Charest Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Building home on a fault line: Aging out of child welfare with a serious mental health diagnosis
AbstractYouth aging out of foster care are at high risk for homelessness. This research explains how and why homelessness occurs among youth with serious mental health struggles after aging out of residential and transitional living programmes. Using a longitudinal constructivist grounded theory design, we analyse 20 in ‐depth interviews exploring youth's transition experiences and perceptions of transition success within 4 months of emancipation and at 6 and 12 months postemancipation. Monthly 15‐min check‐ins prevented attrition. A three‐phase transition process was observed driven by participant desires and acti...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 10, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Vanessa V. Klodnick, Gina M. Samuels Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Foster care in France: children's perception of their own well ‐being
AbstractWorking to improve the welfare of children in care is a priority shared by all French child protection services. However, the means to measure and improve well ‐being are limited (Fergeus et al., 2019). Although the trend today is towards a more comprehensive understanding of the point of view of adults involved in the socioeducational process, too little is done to include the children's own perception of their situation and conditions of care. The purp oses of this study are to document and analyse the point of view of children in foster families on their subjective well‐being and also to identify contextual ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 10, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: S éverine Euillet Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

A court file analysis of child protection cases: What do children say?
In this study, we extracted information about children's statements from court file data of 220 child protection cases in Germany. We found 182 children were asked about their wishes. The majority of the statements found came either from reports of the guardians ad litem or from judicial records of the child hearings. Using content analysis, three main aspects of the statements were extracted: wishes concerning main place of residence, wishes about whom to have or not contact with, and children granting decision ‐making authority to someone else. Children's main focus was on their parents, but others (e.g., relatives and...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 7, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Nicole Kratky, Michela Schr öder‐Abé Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Linking children's social care data to information about their care proceedings to understand the use of care proceedings and their effects on parents, children and local authorities.
AbstractCare proceedings are the most powerful child protection intervention; local authorities make applications for over 20,000 children each year in England and Wales. The Department for Education holds two administrative databases of children who receive services, for children looked after and children in need. These databases do not record the use of care proceedings. Data linkage is a powerful tool for revealing patterns not visible from a single data set; theOutcomes for children before and after care proceedings reform study linked these administrative records with a research database of care proceedings to examine...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 6, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Judith Masson, Ludivine Garside, Sean Jenney Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Evaluating SafeCare ® in Israel: Benefits for the families
We examined parents' behavioural chang es resulting from the three main modules of SafeCare®: the Health, Safety, and Parent‐Child/Infant Interaction. We also studied the unplanned effects of SafeCare® by examining maternal depressive symptoms. Participants were 46 mothers with children identified as being at risk of neglect by the l ocal Department of Social Services who completed the programme. The mothers filled out questionnaires at the beginning and at the end of their participation. After completing the programme, mothers' self‐reports showed changes in how they would treat a sick child, an increase in fe...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 5, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Shani Oppenheim ‐Weller, Anat Zeira, Nofar Mazursky Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Exploring drivers of demand for child protection services in an English local authority
AbstractThis paper reports on an empirical study of child protection services in a local authority where rates of investigations and interventions rose to unprecedented levels during the course of a single year. The aim of the research was to explore explanations for this rise in demand among the providers of children's social care in the area. Using an interpretative qualitative design, a series of focus groups and interviews were carried out with practitioners and managers (n = 25) from statutory services and Early Help. The findings identified a combination of long ‐term and short‐term drivers of demand. Long‐term...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 4, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Rick Hood, Sarah Gorin, Allie Goldacre, Wilson Muleya, Paul Bywaters Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Convergent spaces: Intersectional analysis of ethnic minority status and childhood disability in Irish safeguarding work
AbstractThe core argument of this paper is that intersectionality provides a constructive conceptual lens for the convergence of ethnic minority status and childhood disability in Irish child protection and welfare. The utility of intersectionality in this paper lies in broadening the scope of reflection on the complex intersections of ethnic minority status and childhood disability. Within this, intersectionality is implicitly situated within an overarching critical disability studies perspective. Theoretically informed commentary on the literature attends to three aspects of practice. These are respectively novel interse...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 3, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Susan Flynn Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

“Everyday” Scottish and Finnish child protection work in an age of austerity: A practitioner perspective
This article examines the accounts given by child protection practitioners of how the current economic climate has impacted on their practice. We build our discussion on empirical findings emerging from a small but rigorous qualitative research project conducted by one of the authors. This original study examined Scottish and Finnish social workers' perceptions of their abilities to engage effectively with children and families in what many have described as an “age of austerity.” It set out to explore challenges encountered in daily practice through a cross‐national comparative thematic analysis. The paper i...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 31, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Jenni Lohvansuu, Ruth Emond Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Corrigendum
Child&Family Social Work, EarlyView. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 30, 2020 Category: Child Development Tags: CORRIGENDUM Source Type: research

The education of children in care and children in need: Who falls behind and when?
AbstractWe seek to explain the development of the educational gap between children in “out‐of‐home care” (CLA), children deemed in social need (CIN), and other pupils. A cohort of 642,805 pupils aged 16 in 2013 was used to chart the educational progress of the full cohort, the CLA (n = 6,236), the CIN in 2012 or 2013 but not CLA (n = 20,384), and a sample individually matched with the CLA (n = 11,084). At age 7, attainment of the CLA and CIN was approximately 1 standard deviation lower than the cohort average and predicted attainment at 16. At this point, the persistent “CIN” (those with earlier...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 24, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Ian Sinclair, Nikki Luke, John Fletcher, Aoife O'Higgins, Steve Strand, David Berridge, Judy Sebba, Sally Thomas Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

“She was accused of colluding with the mother”; the training and support needs of parent‐and‐child foster carers: A qualitative study
AbstractParent ‐and‐child foster placements are used to accommodate parents with their children, either when the mother is a looked‐after child or as a setting for a parenting assessment. Despite this being a specialized role with significant potential for affecting outcomes for disadvantaged families, there is currently a lack of accessible learning opportunities for foster carers on the physical and mental well‐being of women with complex needs such as a history of domestic abuse, substance abuse, perinatal mental ill‐health, or having a learning disability. Parent‐and‐child carers experience some unique st...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 23, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Lucy November, Jane Sandall Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Suicidal behaviour in transition ‐aged youth with out‐of‐home care experience: Reviewing risk, assessment, and intervention
AbstractThe rates of suicidal behaviours in youth with out ‐of‐home care experience, particularly those who are on the verge of emancipation, appear to be alarmingly high. The purpose of the current study is to highlight the rates of suicidal ideation and behaviour in these youth, illuminating the empirical risk factors that may increase their vulnerabi lity. We offer a review of screening measures and suicide interventions that may hold promise for administrators, practitioners, and researchers who wish to provide comprehensive assessment for transition‐aged youth with out‐of‐home care experiences and effectivel...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 21, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Colleen C. Katz, Danielle Busby, Chelsey McCabe Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Parental stress and parenting in Chinese immigrant families: The mediating role of social support
This study investigated whether parental stress was associated with parenting and whether this relationship was mediated by social support in a sample of 255 Chinese immigrant parents from the Survey of Asian American Families in New York City. Regression analyses with a rich array of control variables found that a higher level of parental stress and the presence of one or more stressors such as unemployment, low income, and low education were positively associated with the use of harsh discipline and parent –child conflicts and negatively associated with positive parenting practices. Social support functioned as a s...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 21, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Shu ‐Wen Liu, Fuhua Zhai, Qin Gao Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Child maltreatment, maladaptive cognitive schemas, and perceptions of social support among young women care leavers
AbstractThe purpose of the study was to evaluate the associations between child maltreatment, cognitive schemas of disconnection/rejection reported in emerging adulthood, and social support perceived in emerging adulthood among young women who have exited placements in residential care. The sample is derived from a longitudinal study conducted with 132 young women who had been placed in residential care during adolescence in Montreal (Canada) in 2008 –2009. The present study relied solely on the last measurement wave of this study, which was conducted approximately 5 years (2012–2014) after Wave 1. At this time...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 21, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Nadine Lanct ôt Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Inclusive foster care: How foster parents support cultural and relational connections for Indigenous children
AbstractHow do foster parents support the relational and cultural connections of Indigenous children in care? The answer matters; the well ‐being of Indigenous children depends on these connections. At one of Canada's largest Indigenous child welfare agencies, we implemented inclusive foster care, an approach requiring foster parents to engage with the family, community, and cultural life of the child for whom they care. Fifteen year s later, we present findings from a thematic analysis of interviews with 13 foster parents who participated in a mixed methods study exploring inclusive foster care. We discuss foster parent...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 16, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Carolyn Oliver Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

The circular construction of “risk” for children of oppressed groups: Israeli social workers' perspectives on children of Ethiopian origin
This article presents the findings of a research project that explored the perceptions and constructions of Israeli social workers, serving families of Ethiopian origin in Israel, regarding “risk” vis‐à‐vis the children of this community. Thirty semistructured in‐depth interviews with social workers of Ethiopian and non‐Ethiopian origin were conducted and thematically analysed. The study findings indicate that the risk posed to children from the Ethiopian community, as con ceived by the social workers charged with their treatment, tends to emerge in the interface between four main contexts: the s...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 16, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Shelly Engdau ‐Vanda Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Names and naming in adoption: Birth heritage and family ‐making
AbstractIn this article, we consider the significance and practices of names and naming in adoption to develop understanding of the issue amongst scholars, policymakers, adoption practitioners, and adoption communities. Research on the topic of names and adoption is scarce and focused mostly on international and domestic adoptions in the United States. We draw on the research literature to critically explore names and naming in adoption through two recurrent and related themes. The first is “birth heritage,” where names, forenames especially, are shown to be important in the approach taken by adopters to their ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 15, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Jane Pilcher, Zara Hooley, Amanda Coffey Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Removing gender barriers: Promoting inclusion for trans and non ‐binary carers in fostering and adoption
AbstractThis paper offers a conceptually informed analysis of fostering and adoption social work and argues for more consistent inclusion of trans and non ‐binary people. The conceptual framework through which we explore current policy and practice is set out to provide clarity about the ways in which we employ the concepts of trans, gender diversity, and cisgenderism (a prejudicial ideology). We employ the notion of cisgenderism as a critical lens through which to overview fostering and adoption social work within the context of trans inclusion. Focus is turned to the existing literature relevant to trans parenting, tra...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 14, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Claire Brown, Michaela Rogers Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Caregiver ‐endorsed strategies to improving sexual health outcomes among foster youth
AbstractFoster youth are at an increased risk of unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) compared with peers. We conducted 11 semistructured focus groups with 86 foster and kinship caregivers in three child welfare jurisdictions to understand their strategies for monitoring and communicating with youth in foster care around sexual health topics, with the overall goal of developing a training for caregivers to reduce STI and unintended pregnancies among youth in foster care. We used thematic analysis to analyse the data. Three main themes emerged: (1) strategies to communicate with youth about sexu...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 13, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Katie Albertson, Julia M. Crouch, Wadiya Udell, Allison Schimmel ‐Bristow, Jessica Serrano, Kym R. Ahrens Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

“I wish someone would explain why I am in care”: The impact of children and young people's lack of understanding of why they are in out‐of‐home care on their well‐being and felt security
AbstractHaving a good understanding of one's origins and history is known to be significant in identity development. Drawing on a large ‐scale online survey of looked after children's subjective well‐being, this paper demonstrates that a significant number of children and young people (age 4–18 years) did not fully understand the reasons for their entry to care. The paper explores the effect of this lack of knowledge on childr en's well‐being and on their feelings of being settled in their current placement. The study reiterates the need for professionals to be honest and open with children in out‐of‐home c...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 9, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Jo Staines, Julie Selwyn Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Issue Information
No abstract is available for this article. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 8, 2020 Category: Child Development Tags: ISSUE INFORMATION Source Type: research

Parenting challenges of African immigrants in Alberta, Canada
We present these themes and the policy and service implications of our findings. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 2, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Bukola Salami, Dominic A. Alaazi, Philomina Okeke ‐Ihejirika, Sophie Yohani, Helen Vallianatos, Brittany Tetreault, Christina Nsaliwa Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Returning children home from care: What can be learned from local authority data?
This study used 8 years of administrative data (on 2,208 care entrants), collected by one large English local authority, to examine how many children were returned home and to explore factors associated with stable reunification (not re‐enterin g care for at least 2 years). One‐third of children (36%) had been reunified, with adolescent entrants being the most likely age group to return home. Three quarters (75%) of reunified children had a stable reunification. In a fully adjusted regression model, age at entry, being on a care order pr ior to return home, staying longer in care, being of minority ethnicity, and havin...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 30, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Elsbeth Neil, Lisanne Gitsels, June Thoburn Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Parent –professional interviews in child protection: Comparing viewpoints
AbstractSeveral studies have analysed the parent –professional relationship in the field of child protection. Although social workers tend to privilege interviews when working with families and view them as a means through which to build ties, few studies have focused on these interviews. To analyse how professionals and parents position themsel ves, we chose to focus on the content of these interviews and on the associated interactions. To this end, we recorded 13 parent–professional interviews after receiving the consent of the concerned parties. After analysing the interviews, we asked volunteer social worke...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 23, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Michel Boutanquoi, Dominique Ansel, Maryse Bournel ‐Bosson Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Learning from parents: A qualitative interview study on how parents experience their journey through the Dutch child protection system
This study shows new insights in parents' experiences, such as their advice to professionals to determine the truth and to be decisive. This deepened knowledge about parents' experiences is essential for evaluating and improving the CPS. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 23, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Helen Bouma, Hans Grietens, M ónica López López, Erik J. Knorth Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

“Roll back the years”: A study of grandparent special guardians' experiences and implications for social work policy and practice in England
AbstractGrowing numbers of grandparent special guardians (GSGs) are assuming responsibility for increasing numbers of children in the care system in England. Special guardianship arrangements are increasingly used as a permanency option as they allow children to remain in their kinship networks rather than in local authority care or be adopted; yet there is a scarcity of research on GSG carers' experiences. This paper reports a small qualitative research study where 10 sets of grandparents were interviewed to explore their journey to becoming GSGs and to theorize their subsequent experiences. Two themes emerge. First, expe...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 13, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Helen Hingley ‐Jones, Lucille Allain, Helen Gleeson, Bismark Twumasi Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

A qualitative exploration of reentry service needs: The case of fathers returning from prison
AbstractThe challenge of community and family reentry after a parent's release from prison remains an under ‐addressed area of collateral damage stemming from high rates of U.S. incarceration. Many fathers released from prison return to living with family, and later attribute family connections and parent–child contact as key factors in their postrelease success. However, reentry planning is hampered by a dearth of research on family‐focused reentry services, and consequently, often omits attention to resuming family and parenting roles. To address this gap, we conducted 38 semi‐structured interviews with 19 pr...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 13, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Luke Muentner, Pajarita Charles Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

From communication to co ‐operation: Reconceptualizing social workers' engagement with children
AbstractCommunicating and engaging with children is a foundational component of child care social work practice, but all too frequently, in the wake of serious incidents, it is the focus of criticism. Drawing on findings from a large ‐scale ESRC‐funded research project conducted in the four U.K. nations, this paper explores, through a psychosocial analytic lens, how social workers anticipate, enact and reflect on their encounters with both children and their families. Close analysis of what social workers said about their pr actice alongside what they were observed to do in practice revealed perceptions, patterns and p...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 11, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Gillian Ruch, Karen Winter, Fiona Morrison, Mark Hadfield, Sophie Hallett, Viv Cree Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Can better parenting be achieved through short prevention programs? The challenge of universal prevention through Strengthening Families Program 11 –14
This study aims to assess possible changes in family and parental dynamics among families taking part in a short (6‐session) universal program. These changes might act as protective factors for families in preventing substance use. A quasi‐expe rimental design was used, with pretest and posttest evaluations. The participating schools meeting the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. The sample was made up of 16 experimental groups and 17 control groups, with the participation of 353 parents and 289 youths. The results confirm the strengthening of the families by improving the f...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 4, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Lidia S ánchez‐Prieto, Carmen Orte, Lluís Ballester, Joan Amer Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Unaccompanied refugee minors and foster care: A narrative literature review
This article describes the results of a narrative literature review on empirical research examining the outcomes and/or experiences of unaccompanied refugee minors in family foster care. The limited research, in which only 17 references were identified, suggests that family foster care is an important type of care for this group and is associated with better health and psychosocial outcomes compared to other types of care. Nevertheless, breakdown of family foster care placements is a cause for concern. Four groups of factors that influence the course of family foster care placements are discussed, namely, foster family cha...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 2, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Frank Van Holen, Lenny Trogh, Elke Carlier, Laura Gypen, Johan Vanderfaeillie Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Child protection social workers' constructions of children and childhood: An integrative review
AbstractSocial workers' constructions of children and childhood are central to how professionals interact with children and support their needs. The aim of this integrative review was to provide a comprehensive portrayal of child protection social workers' constructions of children and childhood. We analysed and synthesized 35 empirical studies with samples of social workers in the child protection domain where issues regarding the child or the child's situation were the study focus. The findings show that children and youth are constructed as a generalized group viewed in light of their parents. We see a fragmented and co...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 1, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Ida Bruheim Jensen, Ingunn Studsr ød, Ingunn T. Ellingsen Tags: REVIEW ARTICLE Source Type: research