Family treatment court participation and permanency in a rural setting: Outcomes from a rigorous quasi ‐experiment
This study used treatment and matched comparison data to test foster care exit patterns of families with children in foster care due to parental substance use. Treatmen t group data were collected on a sample of 91 children with open dependency cases in an integrated FTC in a rural Midwestern town. Propensity score nearest neighbour one‐to‐two matching was used to identify a comparison group of 146 children. Findings suggest that FTC participation significantly influenced foster care exits. Survival analyses revealed that FTC children were 170% more likely to reunify, and 58% more likely to achieve permanency, than com...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 2, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Margaret H. Lloyd Sieger, Jessica Becker, Jody Brook Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Levels of agreement between youth in out ‐of‐home care and key adults' ratings of sibling and peer relationships: The impact of respondent characteristics and associations to youth resilience
AbstractThe current study utilized survey data to determine if respondent characteristics and inter ‐rater agreement on measures of important relationships were associated with resilience among child welfare‐involved youth. Youth and key adults (e.g., caregivers or caseworkers) each completed a multidimensional survey of youth well‐being. Both responded to measures of sibling and peer relati onships; youth also completed a brief resilience measure. Inter‐rater agreement for sibling and peer relationship constructs were established through independent samplest‐test, Pearson correlation coefficient, Cronbach's kapp...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - March 2, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Armeda Stevenson Wojciak, Jeffrey Waid Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Suicidality among children and youth in Nordic child welfare services: A systematic review
AbstractExisting research has established child welfare (CW) clients as a vulnerable group for developing negative life trajectories, including mental health problems, work ‐ and education‐related challenges and premature mortality. Knowledge of later life conditions including suicidality of clients within child welfare services (CWS) in the Nordic countries is scarce. The overall aim is therefore to gain updated knowledge on how children and youth who have receive d or are receiving CWS interventions from the Nordic CWS fare in relation to suicidality. The population, intervention, comparator, outcome (PICO) framework...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 26, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Anne Marita Milde, Hedda Bjanger Gramm, Ingeborg Paaske, Pia Granli Kleiven, Øivin Christiansen, Karen J. Skaale Havnen Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research

Children expressing their views in child protection casework: Current research and their rights going forward
AbstractArticle 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) provides children with the right to express their views in matters that affect them, particularly those of an administrative and judicial nature. This paper examines the academic discourse in child protection research concerning how Article 12 of the CRC is implemented and how it is manifested in child protection service (CPS) casework practices. The systematic review was performed following the principles of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta ‐Analyses (PRISMA) statement and included 16 peer‐reviewed articles published ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 24, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Asgeir Falch ‐Eriksen, Karmen Toros, Ingrid Sindi, Rafaela Lehtme Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research

Emotion ‐oriented coping and parental competency: An evidence‐based parenting intervention for parents of children with special educational needs
This study examines a promising new coping and parental competency (CPC) intervention for parents of children with special educational needs that targets parents' mental health outcomes. Coping and parental competency impact parents' mental health, but no studies have rigorously assessed whether CPC is an effective strategy for cultivating emotional wellness in these parents. A seven ‐week skills‐based CPC parenting programme was developed and administered in groups. One hundred twenty‐four parents in Hong Kong were randomly assigned to the intervention group or the wait‐list control group. Parents in the intervent...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 24, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Man Yee Ho, Siya Liang Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Exploring mechanisms of change in a dyadic relationship intervention for siblings in foster care
AbstractThere is increasing recognition of the potential for sibling relationships to promote the well ‐being of youth in out‐of‐home care. Efficacious interventions now exist to strengthen the sibling relationships for youth in out‐of‐home care, yet the processes through which these interventions work to enhance sibling relationships remains largely speculative. The current study therefore aimed to identify the critical components of an efficacious dyadic relationship enhancement intervention for siblings in foster care through a secondary analysis of fidelity of implementation and trial outcome data. Data for 1...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 23, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Jeffrey Waid, Brianne H. Kothari, Jessica A. Dahlgren, Bowen McBeath, Lew Bank Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

The intergenerational transmission of family violence: Mothers' perceptions of children's experiences and use of violence in the home
AbstractIntimate partner violence (IPV) on average affects one in four women, with the majority of victim survivors identifying as mothers in national survey data. Children experiencing parental IPV are now equally understood as victims. Extensive research documents the short ‐ and long‐term impacts of children's experiences of IPV on their safety and wellbeing. More recently, research has started to examine adolescent children's use of violence in the home as adolescent family violence (AFV). Contributing to this emerging body of research, we draw on narrative inter view data from mothers who participated in a larger ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 18, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Silke Meyer, Ellen Reeves, Kate Fitz ‐Gibbon Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Building financial capability in youth transitioning from foster care to adulthood
This study assesses whether youth in foster care in the United States who are over age 18 have better financial capability and related supports compared with younger youth and whether there are associations between supports and financial capability. Survey data from 97 youth aged 14 to 20 in foster care were analysed. Participants aged 18 and older had more advanced financial capability than younger youth on several indicators. Older youth were more likely to check in with caring adults about financial ‐related issues and to have been enrolled in an independent living programme, both of which were associated with better ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 16, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Amy M. Salazar, Jacquelene M. Lopez, Sara S. Spiers, Sara Gutschmidt, Kathryn C. Monahan Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Child protection assessment: The point of view of service users in an Italian study
AbstractIn the Child Protection context, assessment is a very delicate phase that often indelibly marks the whole process of helping. In the Italian context, it is very important to deepen this topic: first because it is rarely studied and second because parental skills assessment is carried out by social workers almost exclusively after a request of the Local Authority. This qualitative research aimed to investigate the experiences and the feelings of 16 people assessed about parental skills; furthermore, the study aimed to focus on the quality of their relationship with social workers. The findings have largely confirmed...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 10, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Francesca Corradini, Chiara Panciroli Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Understanding Islamophobia through the eyes of American Muslim children: Religious bullying and school social work interventions
This study uses child‐participatory research methodology to understand experiences of American Muslim children regarding Islamophobia. It was conducted with 26 children participants (N = 26) studying in Grades 5 –8, at an Islamic School in the United States. Drawings and semi‐structured focus group discussions were used for data collection. Findings revealed that Islamophobia should be characterized through a unique child‐centric lens, to recognize how it affects the lives of Muslim children. Narrativ es and silences of female participants highlighted how gendered Islamophobia has become so common for young Mus...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - February 9, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Jannat Fatima Farooqui, Archana Kaushik Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Theory, research and practice in child welfare: The current state of the art in social work
AbstractThis paper aims to utilize social theory to inform relationship ‐based social work practice with children, young people and families. We see ‘direct relationship‐based working’ drawing on theory and evidence as best placed to take forward high quality, humanistic social work practice. We outline the problems with policy and practice development led by th e latest high profile ‘scandal’ or by the overemphasis on experimental design and systematic reviews. This issue was highlighted during a recent debate about appropriate methodologies for exploring Family Group Conferences: the debate is...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 21, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Nick Frost, Pat Dolan Tags: COMMENTARY Source Type: research

Assessing the impact of a virtual support group on adoptive parent stress and competence: Results from an urban/rural pilot study
AbstractDespite the use of support groups among adoptive parents, few empirical works have assessed outcomes associated with participation in these groups, particularly those delivered via virtual platforms. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of participation in a virtual, pilot ‐phase 10‐week adoptive parent support group, on adoptive parent stress and parental competence. The pilot included support groups at two sites in one south‐eastern state, one urban and the other rural. Data were collected via a retrospective pre‐/post‐design and utilized the Parental Stre ss Scale and Parental Sense of Co...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 20, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: J. Jay Miller, Morgan Cooley, Chunling Niu, Melissa Segress, Jessica Fletcher, Karen Bowman, Theresia Maria Pachner Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Issue Information
No abstract is available for this article. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 18, 2021 Category: Child Development Tags: ISSUE INFORMATION Source Type: research

Differences in the reactions of adolescents to family violence
AbstractIntimate partner violence is a pervasive problem and many children and adolescents live under such circumstances. The aim of this research is to qualitatively explore variations among adolescents' reactions to violence occurring at their homes by trying to identify specific patterns in how these adolescents reacted to the violence and how this is related to the length of time they have been exposed to the violence. Fifty ‐eight adolescents (26 boys and 32 girls, 13–18 years of age) recruited in their schools completed a self‐report questionnaire including qualitative open questions regarding the beginning...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 12, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Ainhoa Izaguirre, Åsa Källström Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Work and resilience: Care leavers' experiences of navigating towards employment and independence
AbstractPoor education and employment outcomes have long been associated with care experienced young people transitioning into independence, even after adjusting for prior disadvantage. In the United Kingdom, such young people are generally referred to as care leavers. Policies that aim to reduce the gap between care leavers and non ‐care experienced young people's success transitioning to employment and independence have had limited success. This paper draws on a qualitative methodology that utilized theories of resilience, to glean a range of perspectives from both care leavers and their employers. All the participants...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 9, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Rosemary Furey, Jean Harris ‐Evans Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Family ‘turning point’ experiences and the process of youth becoming homeless
AbstractThe role of family environments, where conflict —ranging from disagreements between young people and their parent(s) or carers to home‐based circumstances where violence and/or abuse is present—is well documented in research that has examined the causes and correlates of youth homelessness. However, far less attention has focused on how you ng people themselves frame and understand the significance of family ruptures. This paper examines the family ‘turning point’ experiences embedded in the life stories of homeless youth. The study, which was biographical and longitudinal, aimed to genera...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 7, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Paula Mayock, Sarah Parker, Andrew Murphy Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Feasible interventions for children in foster care according to service users and practitioners
AbstractMultiple obstacles exist to introducing evidence ‐based methods in social work practice. The study directly interacts with social work practice and maps the interventions practice prioritizes when supporting children or parents. Specifically, the study examines service users' and practitioners' assessment of the feasibility of systematically eva luated interventions in the everyday life of foster care families. To integrate the different perspectives, we use a three‐step process comprising a systematic review of interventions for children in foster care, a literature review of challenges faced by the children t...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 6, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Kresta Munkholt S ørensen, Nina Madsen Sjoe Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Using sexual health and safety education to protect against child sexual abuse in residential care: The LINC model
AbstractChildren and young people living in residential care are vulnerable to sexual abuse, and there is scant evidence about what sexuality education could help address this vulnerability. This paper explores the impact of thePower to Kids: Respecting Sexual Safety programme, which involved capacity ‐building workers to have ‘brave conversations’ with children and young people in residential care. The aim of the study was to capture the perceptions of workers about changes in their skill and confidence levels in relation to having brave conversations with children and young people and the impact of those co...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - January 3, 2021 Category: Child Development Authors: Gemma McKibbin, Anna Bornemisza, Ana Fried, Cathy Humphreys, Madelaine Smales Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Parents' experiences of family team meetings in child welfare
This article describes the benefits of monthly family team meetings for parents involved with child welfare. Findings are shared from semi ‐structured, qualitative interviews conducted with 17 parents whose children had been placed in substitute care. While much of the scholarship on family meetings focuses on opportunities for family voice, this study found that parents received multiple benefits from meetings including, but not lim ited to, the opportunity for input into decision‐making. Specifically, parents appreciated receiving information and feedback, encouragement, and a range of other supports from members of ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 22, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Anna Rockhill Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Unrecognized: Kinship care by young aunts, siblings and other young people
This article describes results from the second part of an Australian research project that explored the prevalence, experiences and support needs of kinship carers aged 18 –30 years through interviews with 41 kinship carers. Most were sisters or aunts. Findings included deep commitment of the carers to children in their care and the children's positive development over time. Young kinship carers described personal costs of caring, including sudden adjustment to the task of parenting distressed children, suspension of studies, jobs and career development, pressures of intrafamilial conflict, a lack of recognition of t...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 14, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Meredith Kiraly, Cathy Humphreys, Margaret Kertesz Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Parental stress and children's school performance: Are locals doing better than rural ‐to‐urban migrants in Beijing?
This study provides the first empirical evidence on whether parental stress is associated with children's school performance (measured by academic performance and peer relations) for rural ‐to‐urban migrants (n = 499) and local residents (n = 299) in Beijing, China. Results from regression analyses showed that children of local families systematically scored better than those of migrants on measures of school performance. Correlation between parental stress and academic performance was found among locals but not among migrant households. Further, although children's peer relations were negatively associated with parent...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 10, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Yixuan Wang, Fuhua Zhai, Fei Pei, Qin Gao Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Relationships of young adults with foster care backgrounds: Tensions and management strategies
AbstractThe present study focuses on experiences of relational tensions and management strategies in family relationships among 18 young adults with foster care backgrounds who participated in interviews. In the analysis drawing from relational dialectics, three main tensions were revealed in the participants' relationships with birth and foster family members or in their romantic relationships: the dialectics of emotional distance ‐closeness, integration‐separation and sameness‐otherness. In addition, the tension of the childhood dialectic of responsibility was identified in this study. The tensions were managed uti...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 8, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Elli ‐Maria Tahkola, Riitta‐Leena Metsäpelto, Maria Ruohotie‐Lyhty, Anna‐Maija Poikkeus Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Experienced support from family, school and friends among students in out ‐of‐home care in a school‐based community survey
AbstractYouth in out ‐of‐home care have elevated risks for adverse events and detrimental circumstances possibly affecting their development. Responses from 311 students in out‐of‐home care (OHC) were compared with peers living in birth parent care (BPC) and in single birth parent care (sBPC) in a regional schoo l survey, directed to students in compulsory school eighth year and upper secondary school second year. Results indicate OHC students to experience less satisfaction with friends, leisure time, and families. They state less trust in support from friends and families but a more similar level to teach ers, co...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 7, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Rikard Tord ön, Gunilla Sydsjö, Marie Bladh, Jennie Svanström, Carl Göran Svedin Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Care(ful) relationships: Supporting children in secure care
AbstractSecure children's homes are used to accommodate children aged 10 –16 under two main categories; while half are sentenced after committing a serious offence, the other half are placed because there are serious concerns around their safety in the community. Secure children's homes are prized within the secure estate, and they administer complex therapeutic suppor t to ‘the most vulnerable’ young people, however little is known about the experiences of those employed to work in such spaces. This paper shares findings from PhD research conducted in one secure children's home over 1 year. Data presente...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 6, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Katie Ellis, Penny Curtis Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Using outcome measures in child protection work
AbstractWhile many evidence ‐based tools and measures exist to support child protection practice, in the United Kingdom, there is little evidence of their routine use in casework. This paper reports on a qualitative study exploring the use of such tools with children and families receiving statutory social care services. Fif teen social workers working in child safeguarding teams in two local authorities in Southeast England agreed to incorporate the use of outcome measures into their casework over a 6‐month period. Qualitative data were collected through monthly action learning workshops held separately in each local ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - December 6, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Rick Hood, Sue Lansley, Toni Mitchell, Elaine Gaskell ‐Mew Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Ontario child protection workers' views on assessing risk and planning for safety in exposure to domestic violence cases
AbstractThe use of standardized tools to assess risk for children is mandatory in the child protection sector in Ontario. Factors that can be used specifically to assess the risk of lethality in exposure to domestic violence (DV) cases, however, are largely missing from these tools. Using data from an online survey of 138 child protection workers in Ontario, the current study examines practitioners' risk assessment and safety planning practices with DV cases. Findings provide an overview of the frequency of risk assessment and management strategies within various environmental contexts (e.g., urban and rural) and populatio...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - November 30, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Laura Olszowy, Peter Jaffe, Myrna Dawson, Anna ‐Lee Straatman, Michael Saxton Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

‘Discuss it with your legal guardian’: Challenges in practising care for young unaccompanied refugee minors
AbstractHow is care arranged for unaccompanied refugee minors at residential care institutions, and what kind of conditions do these arrangements constitute for young persons' well ‐being and development? Informed by developmental perspectives that consider young people's development through participation across contexts in everyday life and by research into how parents in ‘ordinary’ families organize care, we developed a study based on interviews with 15 unaccompanied r efugee minors and their professional caregivers at residential care institutions. The interviews were analysed systematically by exploring h...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - November 26, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Guro Brokke Omland, Agnes Andenas, Nora Sveaass Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Children living with parental substance misuse: A cross ‐sectional profile of children and families referred to children's social care
AbstractParental substance misuse is a significant public health and children's rights issue. In the United Kingdom, social workers frequently work with children and families affected by substance misuse. However, relatively little is known about this population, particularly at point of referral to children's social care. This paper reports on the largest known study of parental substance misuse as a feature of children's social care work in England. The paper provides a cross ‐sectional profile of 299 children living with parental substance misuse and referred to children's social care in one local authority in England...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - November 26, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Jessica Roy Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Mechanisms that mitigate the effects of child poverty and improve children's cognitive and social –emotional development: A systematic review
AbstractThe negative effects of poverty on children's development have been examined in many studies. Poverty exerts its influence on children indirectly through mediating pathways, some of which have powerful effects in reducing the impact of early economic deprivation. However, the literature on the mediating mechanisms through which poverty operates and influences children's cognitive and social –emotional development is limited. This review provides a systematic analysis of published and unpublished studies that investigate mediating mechanisms that have been found to be effective in reducing the effects of early...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - November 20, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Inga Saitadze, Marina Lalayants Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Problem ‐ and solution‐focused characteristics of parenting support, 3 years after implementation of the solution‐focused approach: A qualitative content analysis
This study is the first to thoroughly analyse the problem‐focused an d solution‐focused communication characteristics of professional parenting support using a qualitative content analysis. Parenting support practice in the Dutch YH did not shift substantially to a solution‐focused approach. More effort is required to stimulate and facilitate this professional tr ansformation. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - November 17, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Liesbeth Theuns ‐Boumans, Jolanda Mathijssen, Carin Rots‐de Vries, Ien Goor Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Needs of homeless children in the Czech Republic
AbstractThe needs of homeless children living in shelters and hostels in the Czech Republic have been not sufficiently explored yet. The paper therefore aims to analyse and describe the needs of homeless children living in shelters and hostels in the Czech Republic, thus creating a basis for social work with homeless children and their families. As part of a qualitative research strategy carried out through interviews with parents, children and their social workers, five categories of homeless children's needs (based on Mat ějček's theory) were identified and described in detail based on a data analysis using Charmaz's G...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - November 13, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Kate řina Glumbíková, Marek Mikulec Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Treatment progress of foster care adolescents with severe behavioural problems: Factors conditioning their performance in the residential treatment centres
AbstractBehavioural problems are a recurring issue in the child welfare system population. Normative residential centres do not have the characteristics to address the specific needs of these adolescents, so they are usually treated at therapeutic residential centres. In Catalonia (Spain), these cases are treated in intensive educational residential centres (CREIs), a variant of therapeutic residential care (TRC) facilities. This exploratory study seeks to understand the treatment progress of adolescents with severe behavioural problems who were placed in the CREIs, a variant of TRC facilities. Data from 206 cases, the tot...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - October 18, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Marta Sabat é‐Tomas, Josefina Sala‐Roca, Laura Arnau Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research

The nature and prevalence of kinship care: Focus on young kinship carers
AbstractYoung kinship carers tend to be overlooked in kinship care policy and practice. This Australian research project explored the prevalence of kinship care households in Australia, with a particular focus on households headed by young kinship carers. Census data were utilized to explore the number of kinship care households across the carer age spectrum and some of their characteristics, including households with Indigenous carers and carers with a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) identity. Characteristics of households headed by carers aged 16 –30 years were explored in some detail, and comparisons ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - October 11, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Meredith Kiraly, David Hoadley, Cathy Humphreys Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Parenting Black children in White spaces: Skilled African migrants reflect on their parenting experiences in Australia
AbstractThis paper employs a critical race theory (CRT) perspective to probe the experiences of skilled African migrants parenting Black children in Australia, a predominantly White country. Two key themes emerged from this study: (1) the need to explicitly teach children about race and racism and to foster positive racial identities and (2) the complexities of navigating tensions between ‘African’ and ‘Western’ cultural values. Participants demonstrated high levels of awareness of intercultural parenting approaches and a desire to blend the best aspects of African and Australian cultural values in ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - October 8, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Kathomi Gatwiri, Leticia Anderson Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Issue Information
No abstract is available for this article. (Source: Child and Family Social Work)
Source: Child and Family Social Work - October 3, 2020 Category: Child Development Tags: ISSUE INFORMATION Source Type: research

Quality of experience in residential care programmes: Retrospective perspectives of former youth participants
AbstractThis exploratory study examined perceptions of care quality within parent ‐pay youth treatment programmes such as therapeutic boarding schools, residential treatment centres, wilderness therapy programmes, and intensive outpatient programmes. Reflecting on their personal experiences as youths, 214 adults reported on a total of 75 different treatment settings. Two indice s developed for this study measured participants' perceptions of quality of experience and the totalistic programme characteristics of their care settings. Regression analyses and ANOVA tests of means indicated a negative relationship between tota...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - September 29, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Mark M. Chatfield, David C. Diehl, Tracy L. Johns, Suzanna Smith, Sebastian Galindo ‐Gonzalez Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Promoting family well ‐being and social cohesion: The networking and relational approach of an innovative welfare service in the Italian context
AbstractThis evaluation study examined a Family Services Centre (FSC) operating in a socio ‐culturally deprived suburban area of Southern Italy to explore how promoting innovative practices to meet increasingly complex family needs. The research used a case study approach and a mixed‐methods design: the service's documents underwent a documentary analysis; users' trends and satisfacti on levels were examined using quantitative data; service's identity and changes in the perceptions of professionals were analysed by qualitative techniques. Overall, the data highlighted the fact that the FSC can be considered an effectiv...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - September 1, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Caterina Balenzano Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Sleep among youths in foster care: Associations with potentially traumatic events, PTSD and mental health
AbstractAmong maltreated youth in foster care, little is known about frequency of sleep problems and its association to potential traumatic events (PTEs) and mental health. Among youths in foster care, we examined: (1) sleep patterns, difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (DIMS) and related functional impairment; (2) whether exposure to PTEs, symptoms of post ‐traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general mental health problems are associated with DIMS and related functional impairment, controlling for age, gender and time in foster care; and (3) whether PTSD and general mental health problems mediate the associat...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - August 28, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Stine Lehmann, Kristin G ärtner Askeland, Mari Hysing Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Parents' perceptions of a group ‐based parenting programme in families with child protection and other family support services in a real‐life setting
AbstractThe aim of this study was to assess parents' satisfaction and perceived usefulness of the Incredible Years ® (IY®) parenting programme in the Child Protection Services (CPS) context, where children's behaviour problems are common. Evidence‐based programmes are rarely offered in CPS, and little is known about how they are perceived by parents. We compared parents (N = 62) with (N = 43) and without (N = 19) CPS contact regarding their satisfaction with the IY ® parenting programme, with information gathered from weekly and final evaluation forms. The attendance rate of parents to the weekly sessions (ma...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - August 22, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Piia Karjalainen, Olli Kiviruusu, P äivi Santalahti, Eeva T. Aronen Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Interpretative phenomenological analysis of young people's lived experiences of therapeutic residential care
This study focused exclusively on young people's lived experiences in Australian therapeutic residential care, utilizing interpretative phenomenological analysis. The young people in this study revealed experiences of peer victimization, ambiguous loss and uncertainty during transitions. These findings suggest that more work is required in order to provide safe and healing environments and experiences for young people in therapeutic residential care. Each indivi dual voice captured in this study offers valuable insights into how residential care practitioners can strengthen practice to enhance protection, engagement, conne...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - August 17, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Kenny Kor, Elizabeth Fernandez, Jo Spangaro Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

‘It's so much better than contact’: A qualitative study exploring children and young people's experiences of a sibling camp in the United Kingdom
This study adopted a qualitative approach using semi ‐structured interviews with 11 children and young people; this included one sibling group of three and four sibling groups of two. The children's ages ranged from 8 to 17 years old, and they had all attended at least one camp with their sibling. Findings highlighted how the children valued the ext ended time they could spend with their siblings at camp, and how they felt this enabled them to better understand their siblings and improve their relationships. Findings also showed how the children developed close supportive relationships with the staff at the camps, who en...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - August 15, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Justin Mark Rogers, Mariya Ali Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

Judging parental competence: A cross ‐country analysis of judicial decision makers' written assessment of mothers' parenting capacities in newborn removal cases
AbstractThis paper examines the discretionary reasoning of the judiciary in three jurisdictions, England, Germany and Norway, in cases deciding whether a newborn child is safe with her parents or intervention is necessary. Our analysis focuses on one specific dimension of decision makers' exercise of discretion, namely, if and how the strengths and weaknesses of the mother are considered. The data material consists of all decisions concerning care orders of newborns from one large city in Germany from 2015 to 2017 (n = 27) and 2016 in Norway (n = 76) and all publicly available newborn removal decisions in England for 2015 ...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - August 15, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Jenny Krutzinna, Marit Skivenes Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research

‘It's so much better than contact’: A qualitative study exploring children and young people's experiences of a sibling camp in the United Kingdom
This study adopted a qualitative approach using semi ‐structured interviews with 11 children and young people; this included one sibling group of three and four sibling groups of two. The children's ages ranged from 8 to 17 years old, and they had all attended at least one camp with their sibling. Findings highlighted how the children valued the ext ended time they could spend with their siblings at camp, and how they felt this enabled them to better understand their siblings and improve their relationships. Findings also showed how the children developed close supportive relationships with the staff at the camps, who en...
Source: Child and Family Social Work - August 15, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Justin Mark Rogers, Mariya Ali Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research