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Iceland's proposed ban on male circumcision upsets Jews, Muslims
A proposed bill to ban non-medically required male circumcision on babies and children in Iceland is receiving backlash from religious communities. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Iceland's mooted circumcision ban sparks religious outrage
Jewish, Muslim and Christian leaders condemned the move, calling it an attack on religious freedom. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Surprising Secrets to Living Longer — And Better
Old age demands to be taken very seriously–and it usually gets its way. It’s hard to be cavalier about a time of life defined by loss of vigor, increasing frailty, rising disease risk and falling cognitive faculties. Then there’s the unavoidable matter of the end of consciousness and the self–death, in other words–that’s drawing closer and closer. It’s the rare person who can confront the final decline with flippancy or ease. That, as it turns out, might be our first mistake. Humans are not alone in facing the ultimate reckoning, but we’re the only species–as far as we ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

It ’s Almost Impossible to Get an Abortion in Poland. These Women Crossed the Border to Germany for Help
Dr. Janusz Rudzinski talks on the phone to a woman seeking an abortion as he performs the procedure in Prenzlau, Germany, in March 2017. It’s Almost Impossible to Get an Abortion in Poland. These Women Crossed the Border to Germany for Help By ALEXANDRA SIFFERLIN Photographs by KASIA STREK Kaja was happy to be pregnant. She had experienced two miscarriages in the past, and was hopeful for her third pregnancy. But when she started having severe pain, she knew things weren’t going as planned. She was already suffering a host of complications. Her doctor in Poland prescribed her the drug progesterone, meant to for...
Source: TIME: Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: abortion Poland abortion Poland abortion 2017 Poland abortion ban Poland abortion germany Poland abortion laws Poland abortion protest Poland abortion protests Poland abortion statistics Poland black Monday Poland illegal abortion Source Type: news

In its own ‘war on plastic’, the UK government is a deserter | Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall
The 25-year deadline spells doom for many ocean species. One supermarket ’s pledge to ban plastics puts the target to shameThe prime minister hasdeclared war on plastic, with an announcement that the government hopes to “eliminate all avoidable plastic waste” within 25 years. You could say that this week saw the first troops landing on our plastic-strewn beaches. But, rather than our ministers or MPs, they turned out to be the shelf-stackers and checkout workers of Iceland supermarkets.Those shop workers could well be among the first to handle a new kind of plastics-free packaging that the world so badly ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall Tags: Plastics Food safety Food waste Pollution Oceans fish Science Supermarkets Iceland Foods UK news Source Type: news

Is there a nutritional advantage to fresh vs frozen fish? Well, that depends...
(Natural News) New research shows that frozen fish is just as good as fresh fish if properly prepared. According to an initiative by Trondheim, Norway-based research company SINTEF, the Norwegian Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), and the Icelandic research institute Matis, new methods of handling fish can make it fresh throughout the year.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Recommended Dose: Episode 7 with Sarah Moss
EPISODE 7: SARAH MOSSAcclaimed British novelistHailed as one of the best British novelists writing today,  Sarah Moss is our very special literary guest on TRD this week. She joins Ray to explore the intersection between fiction and health, and to talk about the doctors, patients, parents and families she portrays so vividly in her five highly acclaimed novels.The role of the writer, Sarah says, is to ‘ask hard questions beautifully’. She certainly does this through her own exploration of individual lives and struggles within clearly defined social structures past and present. From the first female do...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - December 6, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Developing EMS Quality Indicators in Nordic Countries
Measuring EMS quality in the Nordic countries Nordic Collaboration Editor's note: Although we usually present a single piece of research in this column, this month we instead present an important article on efforts to benchmark EMS quality in Nordic countries-Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland. Prehospital services are in transition in the Nordic countries, with similar trends worldwide. Increase in population, longer life expectancy and a rapidly growing elderly population increase the need for healthcare, including EMS and out-of-hospital care. The percentage of growth in the number of calls to Norw...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Janne K. Kj øllesdal Tags: Operations Source Type: news

Yet another highly effective herb for sore throats: Icelandic moss is full of nutrients and has been used for eons
(Natural News) Sore throat is the dry, scratchy feeling in the throat can be annoyingly painful. Throughout the years, people have come up with natural ways on how to treat it — from using honey and lemon to gargling salt water, and now even moss. A new study reveals that the plant, particularly Icelandic moss,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The triggering factors of the M óafellshyrna debris slide in northern Iceland: intense precipitation, earthquake activity and thawing of mountain permafrost - Sæmundsson Þ, Morino C, Helgason JK, Conway SJ, Pétursson HG.
On the 20th September 2012, a large debris slide occurred in the M óafellshyrna Mountain in the Tröllaskagi peninsula, central north Iceland. Our work describes and discusses the relative importance of the three factors that may have contributed to the fa... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Injury pattern in Icelandic elite male handball players - Rafnsson ET, Valdimarsson Ö, Sveinsson T, Arnason A.
OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence, type, location, and severity of injuries in Icelandic elite male handball players and compare across factors like physical characteristics and playing position. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: The lat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Moss helps reduce sore throat pain and germs multiplying
EXCLUSIVE: Icelandic moss, which is similar to the plant that grows throughout Europe, could be a new remedy to ease your pain and rasping voice, according to an array of research. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sore throat? Forget honey and lemon – try some MOSS
EXCLUSIVE: Icelandic moss, which is similar to the plant that grows throughout Europe, could be a new remedy to ease your pain and rasping voice, according to an array of research. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Everything You Need to Know About the Real-Life Love Story of Kit Harington and Rose Leslie
Kit Harington and Rose Leslie officially announced their engagement Wednesday, sending fans into a tizzy. Here’s everything we know about the real-life romance between the former co-stars. Where it started It’s unclear exactly when sparks started to fly between Harington and Leslie, but one thing we know for sure is where the two fell for each other — on the set of a little old show called Game of Thrones. “I fell in love in Iceland,” Harington revealed during a 2016 appearance on The Jonathan Ross Show, referring to the filming location of Jon Snow’s scenes beyond the Wall. “I fel...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Megan McCluskey Tags: Uncategorized celebrities game of thrones Jon Snow Kit Harington Rose Leslie Ygritte Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How do parents influence new genetic mutations in children?
Researchers from Iceland look at how parents' age and sex influences new genetic mutations in children that may lead to rare medical conditions. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Fathers pass on four times as many new genetic mutations as mothers – study
Faults in male DNA are a driver for rare childhood diseases, research suggests, with men passing on one new mutation for every eight months of ageChildren inherit four times as many new mutations from their fathers than their mothers, according to research that suggests faults in the men ’s DNA are a driver for rare childhood diseases.Researchers studied 14,000 Icelanders and found that men passed on one new mutation for every eight months of age, compared with women who passed on a new mutation for every three years of age.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Reproduction Science Fertility problems Health Biology Source Type: news

Icelanders Genomes Hint at Origins of Genetic Diversity
An analysis of 14,000 genomes reveals regions where new mutations are more likely to develop. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 20, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Drone-based pizza delivery service launched in Iceland... won't the pizza get cold?
(Natural News) Residents of Reykjavik, Iceland may be the first ones in the world to get their pizzas literally from the heavens. Last Wednesday, August 23, 2017 saw the launch of the world’s first drone delivery service in Iceland’s capital. The drones, which are powered by Tel Aviv, Israel-based drone delivery company Flytrex, made it... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

20,000 international voices share how they want their DNA information used
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The Wellcome Genome Campus and Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) have gone global with a project to explore public attitudes and beliefs on the sharing of genetic information. Now available in English, Russian, German, Portuguese and Polish, with French, Icelandic, Arabic, Japanese, Italian, Swedish, Hindustani and Mandarin translations on the way, the film-based survey, called Your DNA Your Say, is on track to gather feedback from more than 20,000 people around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 31, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fake news of baby booms 9months after major sporting events distorts the public's understanding of early human development science - Grech V, Masukume G.
INTRODUCTION: In France on 27/6/16, Iceland's men's national football team won 2-1, knocking England out of the UEFA European Championship. RESULT: Nine months after this momentous Icelandic victory, Ásgeir Pétur Þorvaldsson a medical doctor in ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Adverse drug reaction reports in Iceland from 2013 to 2016. A comparison with other Nordic countries - Jonsdottir SS, Olafsdottir SM, Gudmundsdottir H.
INTRODUCTION: Information regarding adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of new medications is based on clinical studies of selected populations. The reporting of ADRs from real-life use following the marketing of new active substances is instrumental for the con... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

The country where Down syndrome is disappearing
Iceland has almost eliminated Down syndrome by aborting virtually 100 percent of fetuses that test positive. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here ’s Where You Can See Every Total Solar Eclipse for the Next 50 Years
A total solar eclipse will obscure the sun in parts of 14 states across the U.S. on Aug. 21, a rare event that’s been called the “Great American Eclipse.” You can find a detailed map showing the path of the eclipse here. But if you live in a place that won’t see the total eclipse or even a partial eclipse, don’t worry: It won’t be the last time the U.S. — and the rest of the world — will get a chance to see the moon block the sun in the coming decades. The next total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. will take place in seven years, and even before then total eclipses will take ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized eclipse onetime space 2017 Source Type: news

Behind the Lens: Iceland's Down syndrome dilemma
More than 90 percent of Icelanders trace their ancestors back to the Vikings; they're also remarkably unified on the ethical questions posed by genetic testing (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The country where Down syndrome is disappearing
Iceland has almost eliminated Down syndrome by aborting virtually 100 percent of fetuses that test positive. Should the rest of the world follow suit? (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Behind the Lens: Iceland's Down syndrome dilemma
More than 90 percent of Icelanders trace their ancestors back to the Vikings; they're also remarkably unified on the ethical questions posed by genetic testing (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Preview: Down's Dilemma
Over the past decade, Iceland has virtually eliminated new cases of Down syndrome through widespread use of genetic testing. But some are troubled by a society that can "pick and choose" which children get born. Elaine Quijano went to Iceland to look at the impact for "CBSN: On Assignment." The full report airs Monday, August 14, at 10 p.m. ET/PT on CBS and our streaming network, CBSN. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Preview: Down Dilemma
Over the past decade, Iceland has virtually eliminated new cases of Down syndrome through widespread use of genetic testing. But some are troubled by a society that can "pick and choose" which children get born. Elaine Quijano went to Iceland to look at the impact for "CBSN: On Assignment." (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Iceland's molten roots
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Grocholski, B. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics twis Source Type: news

Seismic evidence for partial melting at the root of major hot spot plumes
Ultralow-velocity zones are localized regions of extreme material properties detected seismologically at the base of Earth's mantle. Their nature and role in mantle dynamics are poorly understood. We used shear waves diffracted at the core-mantle boundary to illuminate the root of the Iceland plume from different directions. Through waveform modeling, we detected a large ultralow-velocity zone and constrained its shape to be axisymmetric to a very good first order. We thus attribute it to partial melting of a locally thickened, denser- and hotter-than-average layer, reflecting dynamics and elevated temperatures within the ...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Yuan, K., Romanowicz, B. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics reports Source Type: news

A Solution to Our Clean Energy Problem May Lie Right Beneath Our Feet
On Iceland’s Reykjanes Peninsula, a short drive from the country’s capital, a team of scientists and engineers is pursuing what they see as an energy source of the future. To unlock it, they have drilled down toward the center of the Earth, through layers of soil and rock, stopping just short of a chamber of molten magma more than 15,000 feet below the surface, a scalding pocket so hot that it would melt a lead pipe. They aim to use that heat to power the energy-hungry world — or at least part of it. The scientists are partners in the Iceland Deep Drilling Project, known as IDDP. They’ve set up shop...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland/Reykjavik Tags: Uncategorized climate change energy Environment Iceland Source Type: news

Nordic registry-based cohort studies: possibilities and pitfalls when combining Nordic registry data - Maret-Ouda J, Tao W, Wahlin K, Lagergren J.
AIMS: All five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) have nationwide registries with similar data structure and validity, as well as personal identity numbers enabling linkage between registries. These resources provide opportunit... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

A prospective study on acute poisonings presenting to the Emergency Department at Landspitali University Hospital in Iceland 2012 - Gudjonsdottir GA, Thordardottir AM, Kristinsson J.
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the study was to assess the incidence and type of toxic exposures presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) at Landspitali University Hospital in Iceland over one year and compare the results to another study performed eleven... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

'It's the closest thing to the moon': my space odyssey to Iceland
How Iceland became a magnet for star-gazers, film-makers – and astronauts‘It’s the elemental childhood fantasy, isn’t it, to see space in some way,” says photographer Robert Ormerod. “I think I wanted to be an astronaut, and then that enthusiasm got replaced by other things. But there are those people who never lose it, and I’m interested in what they do with that passion. Such a small fraction of the population will ever go to space – how do those people live their dream?”It ’s a question that in recent years has led Ormerod all over the world in pursuit of space...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Iceland holidays Space Europe World news Science Photography Northern lights holidays Art and design Travel Culture Europe holidays Source Type: news

Methylphenidate disintegration from oral formulations for intravenous use by experienced substance users - Bjarnadottir GD, Johannsson M, Magnusson A, Rafnar BO, Sigurdsson E, Steingrimsson S, Asgrimsson V, Snorradottir I, Bragadottir H, Haraldsson HM.
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Methylphenidate (MPH) is a prescription stimulant used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. MPH is currently the preferred substance among most intravenous (i.v.) substance users in Iceland. Four types of MPH preparations... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

The science of shootouts offers escape from England ’s penalty complex | Ben Lyttleton
Training for shootouts can deliver escape from the penalty lottery, but England must stop living in the pastAt least this time, an England team made it to a penalty shootout. In recent tournaments, the senior team finished bottom of their 2014 World Cup group, andlost against Iceland in their first Euro 2016 knockout match. So when England Under-21s reached the Euro 2017 semi-final and took a far more experienced Germany team to penalties, that in itself represented progress – untilthe penalty curse struck again.This was an opportunity for England to exorcise some serious penalty ghosts. The Germany coach w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ben Lyttleton Tags: Football England Under-21s European Under-21 Championship Sport Source Type: news

Family counts: deciding when to murder among the Icelandic Vikings - Palmstierna M, Frangou A, Wallette A, Dunbar R.
In small scale societies, lethal attacks on another individual usually invite revenge by the victim's family. We might expect those who perpetrate such attacks to do so only when their own support network (mainly family) is larger than that of the potentia... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

[Report] Tungsten-182 heterogeneity in modern ocean island basalts
New tungsten isotope data for modern ocean island basalts (OIB) from Hawaii, Samoa, and Iceland reveal variable 182W/184W, ranging from that of the ambient upper mantle to ratios as much as 18 parts per million lower. The tungsten isotopic data negatively correlate with 3He/4He. These data indicate that each OIB system accesses domains within Earth that formed within the first 60 million years of solar system history. Combined isotopic and chemical characteristics projected for these ancient domains indicate that they contain metal and are repositories of noble gases. We suggest that the most likely source candidates are m...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Andrea Mundl Source Type: news

Foreign citizen mortality in Iceland January 2006 - December 2016 - Kunz SN, Bingert R.
BACKGROUND: In recent years, tourism has become the number one account for foreign exchange income in Iceland, overtaking the fisheries industry and aluminium production. The rise of tourism has strongly affected Icelandic society in various sectors. With ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news

The secret to Iceland's happiness? It's in the water
When it comes to socializing, England has its pubs. Italy has its piazzas. And Iceland has its pools. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Enormous swarms of midges teach about interconnected landscapes
Ecologists are trying to understand why the midge population at an Icelandic lake can fluctuate by 100,000-fold across a decade, and what impact these massive swarms have on the surrounding landscape. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

The key to curing disease could lie in Iceland's genes
The freezer sits behind a heavy door in the basement of an unassuming building on the campus of the University of Iceland. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A population-based study on epidemiology of intensive care unit treated traumatic brain injury in Iceland - Jonsdottir GM, Lund SH, Snorradottir B, Karason S, Olafsson IH, Reynisson K, Mogensen B, Sigvaldason K.
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury is a worldwide health issue and a significant cause of preventable deaths and disabilities. We aimed to describe population-based data on intensive care treated traumatic brain injury in Iceland over 15 years period. ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Human Evolution May Be Lowering Academic Achievement Human Evolution May Be Lowering Academic Achievement
Delayed child-bearing among those with genetic variations associated with higher education may be evolutionarily selecting against these traits, an Icelandic study found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

The Guardian view on education: it ’s not all in the genes
Our educational attainment and when we have children is determined a little by chromosomes but much more by social and environmental conditionsHuman intelligence quite obviouslyhas some genetic component. Genes do constrain our fate, as does luck, even if development matters more. The way that our capacities develop is profoundly influenced by the environment and by the social situation in which a child grows up. Genetic influence is not genetic determinism and the interplay between genes and development isenormously complicated. Astudy based on the population of Iceland at first sight makes claims to show thatsome genes f...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Genetics Biology Science Education Evolution Source Type: news

New study will help find the best locations for thermal power stations in Iceland
A new research article gives indications of the best places in Iceland to build thermal power stations. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Natural selection making 'education genes' rarer, says Icelandic study
Researchers say that while the effect corresponds to a small drop in IQ per decade, over centuries the impact could be profoundTempting as it may be, it would be wrong to claim that with each generation humans are becoming more stupid. As scientists are often so keen to point out, it is a bit more complicated than that.A study from Iceland is the latest to raise the prospect of a downwards spiral into imbecility. The research from deCODE, a genetics firm in Reykjavik, finds that groups of genes that predispose people to spend more years in education became a little rarer in the country from 1910 to 1975.Continue reading......
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Education Evolution Source Type: news

Tilikum, Orca At The Center Of SeaWorld Controversy, Has Died
Tilikum, the SeaWorld orca featured in the 2013 documentary “Blackfish,” died Friday ― two days before the company plans to officially end its orca show at its San Diego park. We’re saddened to announce the passing of Tilikum, a beloved member of the SeaWorld family for 25 years. https://t.co/T7Y3fTgecp pic.twitter.com/vLfpi5szCc— SeaWorld (@SeaWorld) January 6, 2017 “The SeaWorld family is deeply saddened to announce that one of its most well-known orcas, Tilikum, has passed away. Tilikum passed away early this morning, January 6, surrounded by trainers, care staff and veteri...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news