For Kids With O.C.D., Coronavirus Precautions Can Go Too Far

How parents can distinguish between hand-washing that is a reasonable reaction to a real threat and something more concerning.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus Risks and Safety Concerns Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Children and Childhood Fear (Emotion) Content Type: Service Telemedicine Therapy and Rehabilitation Hygiene and Cleanliness Parenting Source Type: news

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Mental health flows from the ceramic jug psychotherapist Lori Gottlieb keeps on her desk. There’s nothing special about the jug—a minor accessory in an office designed with the sort of tidy impersonality common to her field. And there’s no special elixir in it—just water. But all the same, the jug provides a certain kind of healing. When patients are struggling, crying, overcome in some way, Gottlieb, a Los Angeles based practitioner and author of the book Maybe You Should Talk to someone, will offer up a cup of water, pour it for them and hand it across. In that small gesture is a whole constellati...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The year 2020 will go down in history as one of the most devastating in history. Hundreds of thousands have died and millions have been hospitalized due to the novel coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19 has changed the lives of so many. No matter where you live, dealing with the effects of economic and physical lockdowns in a community leads to multiple mental health challenges. After months of living with the coronavirus, many people are getting tired, burned out, and more and more frustrated. In America, we face a particular challenge. Our federal government has chosen to take a backseat during the pandemic. Instead of leadin...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Source Type: blogs
Research suggests more than half experience PTSD, anxiety, insomnia, depression or compulsive symptomsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageMore than half of people who received hospital treatment for Covid-19 were found to be suffering from a psychiatric disorder a month later,a study has found.Out of 402 patients monitored after being treated for the virus, 55% were found to have at least one psychiatric disorder, experts from San Raffaele hospital in Milan found. The results, based on clinical interviews and self-assessment questionnaires, showed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 28% o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Medical research Coronavirus outbreak Science Mental health Source Type: news
Abstract Infection-triggered perturbation of the immune system could induce psychopathology, and psychiatric sequelae were observed after previous coronavirus outbreaks. The spreading of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic could be associated with psychiatric implications. We investigated the psychopathological impact of COVID-19 in survivors, also considering the effect of clinical and inflammatory predictors. We screened for psychiatric symptoms 402 adults surviving COVID-19 (265male,meanage58), at one month follow-up after hospital treatment. A clinical interview and a battery ...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Behav Immun Source Type: research
After the outbreak of Coronavirus disease was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization, this resulted in extraordinary public health measures to control the infection, such as entire countries being placed under quarantine. The psychopathological consequences of the pandemic and quarantine were anticipated to be of particular relevance, especially in patients with psychiatric disorders such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Aim of the present report was to describe the impact of COVID-19 pandemics within a sample of Italian patients affected by OCD. Sociodemographic and clinical variables of a sample of 1...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web Rats are generally Good Samaritans: they help other rats in trouble, particularly when they’re in a group. But after their companions are given drugs which make them passive, the rats seem to lose their willingness to help, reports Nell Greenfieldboyce at NPR. The findings have similarities with the bystander effect in humans, where the presence of unresponsive bystanders can make someone less likely to help. Unconscious bias training has been in the spotlight recently, after Keir Starmer promised that the Labour party will undergo such t...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs
I ’d come to think of myself as a sad wizard, burdened with rituals to prevent catastrophes. Then the pandemic made those threats realFor many of us, coronavirus has inspired a bit of a germ obsession. We wash our hands until they ’re chapped. We see other people as potential vectors. We wipe down our groceries with Lysol, apparently having decided that, if it comes to it, we’d rather die of disinfectant poisoning than a virus.In our efforts not to contract Covid-19, many of us are getting a taste of a different kind of illness: obsessive-compulsive disorder. And for some who have spent years learning to ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Mental health Psychology Coronavirus outbreak Source Type: news
One of the hallmarks of obsessive-compulsive disorder is contamination fears and excessive hand-washing. Now, these same behaviors are accepted and even encouraged to keep everyone healthy as the global coronavirus pandemic wears on.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
A few months ago, our world turned upside down. Suddenly we faced “a new normal” — we started fearing everyday germs that we’ve never worried about before. Suddenly we were all washing our hands all day long, we were fearful of touching subway poles, and we were avoiding touching the bottoms of our shoes when coming in from outside. And perhaps most distressing of all, we were left with the constant lingering thoughts of “have I done enough to protect myself and my loved ones?” For a segment of society, though, was this really the new normal? For people like me who suffer from Obsessive ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: OCD contamination OCD coronavirus COVID-19 Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Responsibility OCD Source Type: blogs
IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 4477: Using Mind–Body Modalities via Telemedicine during the COVID-19 Crisis: Cases in the Republic of Korea International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph17124477 Authors: Chan-Young Kwon Hui-Yong Kwak Jong Woo Kim The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected the world, and its deleterious effects on human domestic life, society, economics, and especially on human mental health are expected to continue. Mental health experts highlighted health issues this pandemic may cause, such as depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disord...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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