Women on the pill may face high risks of blood clots if infected with coronavirus

Both coronavirus and high levels of estrogen from the pill, being pregnant or taking HRT raise cot risks, warn doctors at Maine Medical Center and say aspirin or staying off the pill may lower risks.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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After being epidemic in China, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) infection has rapidly spread in many countries as a global pandemic, with the number of affected cases dramatically increasing worldwide on a daily basis. Although the median age of hospitalized patients with confirmed infection is usually more advanced 1, with older age reported to be associated to higher mortality rate 2, physiological adaptations occurring during pregnancy have been claimed to be potentially responsible for a more severe respiratory disease, thus leading to higher rates of maternal and fetal complications 3,4.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: The Annals of Thoracic SurgeryAuthor(s): Sharon Beth Larson, Sarah N. Watson, Michael Eberlein, Jonathan S. Simmons, Kevin C. Doerschug, Kimberly K. Leslie
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to determine the rate of abnormal serum cardiac biomarkers or bradycardia among pregnant and immediately postpartum women admitted for treatment of severe or critical COVID-19 in a large integrated health system in New York.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research Letter Source Type: research
[Global Sisters Report] Machakos -- Sarah, who is four months pregnant, ponders her fate as she sits in front of her house - watching her peers play outside their homestead in this settlement located 39 miles southeast of the capital, Nairobi. With her kanga wrapper tied around her bust and another colorful one on her waist, Sarah says she will not be returning to school even when coronavirus restrictions are eased.
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - Category: OBGYN Source Type: news
Jennifer Doudna was sound asleep when her phone began buzzing, so she missed the first few calls. When the incessant ringing finally roused her at 3 a.m., it was a reporter who wanted her reaction to the just-awarded Nobel Prize in Chemistry. “Who won?” Doudna asked. “It was a little embarrassing,” Doudna said during a press conference held later in the day when the reporter told her she had been given the prestigious award, along with her collaborator Emmanuelle Charpentier from the Max Planck Institute. “I was really deeply asleep.” Doudna and Charpentier were jointly awarded the 2020 ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
An enigmatic epidemiological feature of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is the high rate of asymptomatic infection in pregnant women.1 This is puzzling because systemic immune changes predispose pregnant women to increased severity of respiratory viral infections, especially influenza A.2 A major roadblock in understanding this atypical clinical presentation is the poor characterization of cellular entry factors for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) — angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and the androgen-sensitive transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) — in the respiratory tract during pregnancy.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research Letter Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Source Type: research
A new study, from UCSF and UCLA, found that half of expectant mothers with COVID-19 still had symptoms after three weeks and one-quarter had symptoms after eight weeks.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19, SARS and MERS have significant detrimental effect on pregnancy. Rapid intervention, treatment, and intensive care support are essential for infected pregnant. Timely delivery is important in order to avoid intrauterine fetal death. PMID: 33015821 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
The disease caused by the “severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2” (SARS-CoV-2) was named Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) and classified as a global public health emergency. The evidence related to the impact of COVID-19 on pregnancy are limited to the second and the third trimester of pregnancy, while data on the first trimester are scant. Many viral infections can be harmful to the fetus during the first trimester of pregnancy, and whether SARS-CoV-2 is one of them is still unknown.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Original Research: Obstetrics Source Type: research
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