Coronavirus: 'When lockdown eased, my panic attacks returned'

When lockdown began Seaneen Molloy's panic attacks stopped, but as restrictions are eased, her anxiety is returning.
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

When lockdown began Seaneen Molloy's panic attacks stopped, but as restrictions are eased, her anxiety is returning.
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Javelot H, Weiner L Abstract Although the "panic" word has been abundantly linked to the SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) pandemic in the press, in the scientific literature very few studies have considered whether the current epidemic could predispose to the onset or the aggravation of panic attacks or panic disorder. Indeed, most studies thus far have focused on the risk of increase and aggravation of other psychiatric disorders as a consequence of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and general...
Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
Recently, anxiety overtook depression, ADHD, and all other conditions to be the Number One mental health challenge.  We’re currently under siege by an invisible enemy, and most of our anxiety levels are higher than before. For some time, however, anxiety has been on the rise as we face all the everyday choices we have to make, both small and potentially life changing. We live in a highly complex world that complicates our existence and creates newer tensions.  The Process of Anxiety Most people think of anxiety as an emotional state, and it is. But anxiety is also a process that starts with several uncomfor...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: news
The COVID-19 virus has impacted and will continue to impact every aspect of our lives. Fortunately, we can get a head start on successful recovery from these effects by taking lessons from people who are grieving and those who are battling substance abuse. At first glance, this may seem an unusual comparison. Maybe losing loved ones to the pandemic ties into grief support, but how can economic and social turmoil be calmed by that? How can sobriety, long-term or not, be remotely related to any of these subjects? It turns out the three are closely related in coping strategies and systematic approaches required for our world...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Substance Abuse coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Source Type: blogs
For weeks, Roberta Brivio’s phone has been ringing several times an hour. “I can’t even find the time to eat,” she says from her office in Melegnano, south of Milan. A 74-year-old psychologist living in Lombardy, Brivio is the president of the local branch of the Italian Society for Emergency Psychology. Italy has the world’s highest death toll from COVID-19, with more than 16,000 coronavirus-related deaths so far; more than half of those deaths have been in the northern region of Lombardy. In early March, after Italy’s COVID-19 outbreak flared up near her home, Brivio and four colleague...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
The war of withdrawal is beginning to settle in, though is not a comfortable routine with people. We are beginning to realize this invisible enemy is stronger than anticipated and unpredictable. Rules surrounding behavior and activities keep growing. If you permit yourself to read and listen to all information about COVID-19, it may cause a spike of depression and anxiety. It may force people to take a closer look at themselves and others in this unpredictable threat. This on-going crisis has no end in sight as we hear and read more cases end in death. What is important is to accept this new lifestyle and pull together tho...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Communication Self-Help coronavirus COVID-19 Isolation Loneliness pandemic Panic Attacks social connection socializing Source Type: blogs
(University of Vermont) A new cell phone app developed by faculty at the University of Vermont can help panic attack sufferers, whose condition may be worsened by the coronavirus pandemic, manage their anxiety. The concept is grounded in decades of research showing that enabling panic sufferers to observe their body's reaction to stress reduces panic.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news
When you already have an anxiety disorder, and a real pandemic hits, you can feel especially lost and terrified. Clinical psychologist Regine Galanti, Ph.D, helps her clients recognize that their anxiety is a false alarm—“it’s not your house on fire, it’s a pizza burning in the toaster.” But because of Coronavirus, she said, your house is actually ablaze. In other words, it makes sense that you’re anxious. It makes sense that your symptoms have flared up or gotten worse, agreed Emily Bilek, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist and clinical assistant professor at University of Michigan. Bilek no...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders General Health-related Self-Help Stress coronavirus COVID-19 quarantine social distancing Source Type: blogs
If you suffer from panic attacks or are prone to them, you might find that you are experiencing them more than usual. The uncertainty in these challenging times as we face a global pandemic — it’s the perfect storm for intense fear and a sense of dread that cripples those who suffer from panic attacks. It triggers physical symptoms like a pounding heart, sweating, shortness of breath, nausea, chest pain, or trembling. It can last 5 to 20 minutes but can feel like forever. Despite the scary situation you find yourself in, the “silver lining” is that once you learn to recognize when your attacks are c...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Stress Anxiety Attack coronavirus COVID-19 Panic Attack stress reduction Source Type: blogs
These days, we all have to accept the anxiety inherent in living in the time of the coronavirus pandemic and COVID-19. If there was a way to dispel all anxious feelings, I’d tell you, but there isn’t. The one exception might be someone who could summon such a degree of denial that they carry on as if everything was normal. And that, as I’m sure you can see, would prove to be very, very unwise. Anxiety helps us prepare to respond in a more adaptive and healthy way. Some people find it possible to tolerate some degree of discomfort and can manage their anxiety in a healthy manner. Often that’s because...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Health Infectious diseases Mental Health Source Type: blogs
More News: Anxiety | Coronavirus | COVID-19 | Health | Panic Disorder